Photonics in Switching and Computing

27 September 2021 – 29 September 2021
Optica Virtual Event - Eastern Daylight/Summer Time (UTC - 04:00)

Stephen Furber

The University of Manchester


Neuromorphic Computing
Neuromorphic computing, that is, computing based upon brain-like principles - can be traced back to the pioneering work of Carver Mead in the 1980s. Academic research into neuromorphic systems has continued since then in various forms, including analog, digital and hybrid systems, primarily with the objective of improving understanding of information processing in the brain. More recently, industrial neuromorphic systems have emerged - first the IBM TrueNorth, and then the Intel Loihi - with a greater focus on practical applications. In parallel, the last decade has seen an explosion of interest in less brain-like, though still brain-inspired, artificial neural networks in machine learning applications that have, for example, placed high-quality speech recognition systems into everyday consumer use. However, these artificial neural networks consume significant computer and electrical power, particularly during training, and there is strong interest in bringing these requirements down and in enabling continuous on-line learning to take place in self-contained, mobile configurations. There is a growing expectation, so far unsubstantiated by compelling evidence, that neuromorphic technologies will have a role to play in delivering these efficiency gains. The SpiNNaker (Spiking Neural Network Architecture) platform is an example of a highly flexible digital neuromorphic platform, based upon a massively-parallel configuration of small processors with a bespoke interconnect fabric designed to support the very high connectivity of biological neural nets in real-time models. Although designed primarily to support brain science, it can also be used to explore more applications-oriented research.
Neuromorphic computing, that is, computing based upon brain-like principles - can be traced back to the pioneering work of Carver Mead in the 1980s. Academic research into neuromorphic systems has...

About the Speaker
Steve Furber CBE FRS FREng is ICL Professor of Computer Engineering in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Manchester, UK. After completing a BA in mathematics and a PhD in aerodynamics at the University of Cambridge, UK, he spent the 1980s at Acorn Computers, where he was a principal designer of the BBC Microcomputer and the ARM 32-bit RISC microprocessor. Over 180 billion variants of the ARM processor have since been manufactured, powering much of the world's mobile and embedded computing. He moved to the ICL Chair at Manchester in 1990 where he leads research into asynchronous and low-power systems and, more recently, neural systems engineering, where the SpiNNaker project has delivered a computer incorporating a million ARM processors optimised for brain modelling applications.
Steve Furber CBE FRS FREng is ICL Professor of Computer Engineering in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Manchester, UK. After completing a BA in mathematics and a PhD in...

Hong Liu

Google


The Evolving Role of Optics in the Hyperscale Data Centers
The optical layer has evolved and expanded rapidly to significantly shape and differentiate compute infrastructure. To support the staggering growth of bandwidth for networking and machine learning, optical technology remains as the critical driver.  We will present an overview and future roadmap of data center optics, including the need and challenge with tighter integration of optics and electronics.  
The optical layer has evolved and expanded rapidly to significantly shape and differentiate compute infrastructure. To support the staggering growth of bandwidth for networking and machine learning...

About the Speaker
Hong Liu is currently a Distinguished Engineer with Google Technical Infrastructure, where she is involved in the system architecture and optical solutions for a large-scale computing platform. She received the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. Her research interests include interconnection networks, high-speed signaling, optical access, and metro design. Prior to joining Google, she was a Member of Technical Staff with Juniper Networks, where she worked on the architecture and design of network core routers and multichassis switches. She is an OSA Fellow.
Hong Liu is currently a Distinguished Engineer with Google Technical Infrastructure, where she is involved in the system architecture and optical solutions for a large-scale computing platform. She...

Masaya Notomi

NTT Basic Research Laboratories


Attojoule Nanophotonics Towards Optoelectronic Accelerators
Recent advances of integrated nanophotonics achieved ultrasmall consumption energy of various photonic devices; paving the way to photonic circuitry in a processor chip. Ultrasmall capacitance of nanophotonic devices lead to dramatic improvement in OE/EO conversion efficiency, indicating a paradigm shift in a role of photonics inside a chip. The possible impact for optoelectronic accelerators based on these technologies will also be discussed.
Recent advances of integrated nanophotonics achieved ultrasmall consumption energy of various photonic devices; paving the way to photonic circuitry in a processor chip. Ultrasmall capacitance of...

About the Speaker
Masaya Notomi received B.E., M.E. and Ph.D. degrees in applied physics from the University of Tokyo in 1986, 1988, and 1997. He has been working on physics and applications of nanophotonics, including photonic crystals and plasmonics. His work involves novel phenomena arising from nanophotonic structures, enhancement of light-matter interactions, and applications for integrated optoelectronic computations. He is currently Senior Distinguished Scientist of NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, Japan and heading NTT Nanophotonics Center. Since 2017, he has been cross-appointed as a professor in Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan. He is also an IEEE Fellow.
Masaya Notomi received B.E., M.E. and Ph.D. degrees in applied physics from the University of Tokyo in 1986, 1988, and 1997. He has been working on physics and applications of nanophotonics...

Jeremy O'Brien

PsiQuantum


Leveraging Advanced Semiconductor Manufacturing Processes to Build the World’s First Useful Quantum Computer
It is increasingly accepted that all commercially valuable quantum computing applications require error-correction and therefore at least 1 million physical qubits to do anything useful. The manufacturing capability and expertise of the semiconductor industry is needed to deliver a commercially viable quantum computer on any reasonable time or money scale. In this talk, we will show how unique technology in the areas of silicon photonics and quantum system architecture enable the path to manufacturability and scalability of a fault-tolerant, general-purpose quantum computer.
It is increasingly accepted that all commercially valuable quantum computing applications require error-correction and therefore at least 1 million physical qubits to do anything useful. The...

About the Speaker
Jeremy O'Brien is co-founder and CEO of PsiQuantum. PsiQuantum is building a large-scale general-purpose silicon photonic quantum computer to solve the many important problems that will forever be beyond the capabilities of any conventional computer. Prior to founding the company, Jeremy was Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering at Stanford and Bristol Universities, and Director of the Centre for Quantum Photonics. He has spent more than 20 years working towards scalable quantum computing, including: micro-, nano- and atomic-scale design, fabrication and operation of superconducting and semiconductor devices; design, construction and operation of cryogenic and ultra-high vacuum systems; design, construction and application of low-noise electrical measurement to organic-, super- and semi-conductor (nano)structures; and the theory of quantum computing.
Jeremy O'Brien is co-founder and CEO of PsiQuantum. PsiQuantum is building a large-scale general-purpose silicon photonic quantum computer to solve the many important problems that will forever be...