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What is Applied Industrial Optics?

Applied Industrial Optics (AIO) is a unique conference where industrial professionals are asked to speak about their work, which typically is never published, unless as a patent. While many industrial societies have conferences that approach this format, the Optics and Photonics industry typically only has trade shows, such as CLEO and Photonics West. For industrial participants, these events...

Added:05 May 2016


Next Steps for Label-free Optical Techniques in Diagnostics & Imaging

Last week’s Incubator on Label-free Optical Techniques for Biomedical Diagnostics & Imaging participants identified opportunities and challenges for label-free optical techniques and concluded with a clear call to continue the conversation. The hosts will continue to work with the participants to produce a white paper that will outline a prioritized list of recommendations to address...

Added:22 Sep 2015


Exploring the Challenges & Opportunities for Label-free Optical Imaging

This morning, OSA’s latest Incubator – the Incubator on Label-free Optical Techniques for Biomedical Diagnostics & Imaging: Challenges and Opportunities for Clinical Translation kicked-off. This meeting is hosted by Paul French, Imperial College, United Kingdom; Laura Marcu, University of California - Davis, USA; Robert J. Nordstrom, National Institute of Health, USA; Juergen...

Added:17 Sep 2015


What you can do with spectroscopy and more - AIO Day 2

 Thomas Tague (Brucker Optics Inc, USA) opened the first Applied Industrial Optics session on Day 2 - Dr Photon to the Rescue - with a talk on 'Novel Applications of Molecular Spectroscopy to Heritage and Biomedical Fields of Study'. Thomas described the in-situ analyses of graffiti pigments in rock paintings at Hueco Tanks State Park using Raman and X-Ray...

Added:10 Jun 2015


Optical Tomographers Beware!

To all of you optical tomography researchers reading this: admit it, you’re a bit of a gadget geek. The last thing you want is to let your expensive, fancy equipment come into contact with your imaging subjects, especially animals. That’s the real reason why you keep building all of your systems in “non-contact” geometries. Well, according to Shelley Taylor from Prof...

Added:30 Apr 2014


The Binding Finding of a Fluorescence Lifetime

In this afternoon’s session on Luminescence and Absorption on Cellular and Tissue Levels, Prof. Victor Chernomordik gave an overview of the extensive work he and his colleagues have been undertaking to make fluorescence molecular imaging more quantitative. Much of their work has focused specifically on how to quantify human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) concentrations (a key...

Added:27 Apr 2014


The Early Photon Gets the Worm

One of the biggest problems with using light to analyze biological tissue is that photons in the visible and near-visible spectrum have a very high probability of scattering multiple times as they propagate through the tissue. This is a well-known problem that restricts high-resolution optical microscopy to tissue thicknesses of only a few microns. It has also led researchers to develop...

Added:25 Apr 2014


Salt and Pepper (Noise): Key Ingredients for Imaging Blood Flow

We’ve all experienced that “salt-and-pepper”, or white noise when our favorite television show cuts out on us. Well it turns out that similar “speckle” patterns are also seen when projecting laser light onto biological tissue, owing to interference patterns of the monochromatic light source. Now you might say, “so what!” and that’s probably what...

Added:25 Mar 2014


Day 1: Seeing Order in Disorder

Greetings from Washington, DC, and the OSA Controlled Light Propagation Incubator meeting! Hosted by Tom Bifano and Jerome Mertz, Boston University, USA; Sylvain Gigan, Institut Langevin, France; and Allard Mosk, University of Twente, Netherlands; today’s event brings leading researchers from the fields of biological imaging and adaptive optics together with partners from industry and...

Added:06 Mar 2014


Reducing Drug Trial Costs with Imaging Technology

95% of new cancer therapeutics fail to make it past Phase II clinical trials. This means that while it should only cost about $50 million per drug for FDA approval, incorporating the cost of failures leads to an estimated cost of $1 billion per drug (1), with a recent Forbes article suggesting that this number is considerably higher (2).So why are so many drugs failing in clinical trials?

Added:04 Mar 2014