Filter

Matching tags for Biomedical Optics:

The computational modeling conversation continues…

The final session from Day 1 of the Incubator was Performance Metrics/Task-based Assessment. Andrew Watson, from NASA Ames Research Center focused on visual performance metrics for imaging systems. He analyzed the problems of traditional models and discussed improvements that could be made using new approaches. His used examples of letters, aircraft, and watercraft to further illustrate his...

Added:15 Apr 2016


​OSA Incubator on Computational Modeling & Performance Metrics for Imaging System Design & Evaluation – Day 1

During the OSA Incubator on Computational Modeling & Performance Metrics for Imaging System Design & Evaluation hosts Joseph Reynolds, from the Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate of the U.S. Army, and Christian Graff, from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, gave the overview of what they wanted to accomplish. The goal of this meeting is to share information...

Added:14 Apr 2016


Adaptive Structured Illumination Incubator

What are the barriers for super-resolution at depth?What are the fundamental limits in fibre imaging (resolution, correction, speed)?What are the challenges of using structured illumination for in vivo imaging?These are just a few of the questions that were explored at last week’s Adaptive Structured Illumination Incubator. Hosted by Meng Cui from Purdue University, US, and...

Added:19 Nov 2015


Next Steps for Label-free Optical Techniques in Diagnostics & Imaging

Last week’s Incubator on Label-free Optical Techniques for Biomedical Diagnostics & Imaging participants identified opportunities and challenges for label-free optical techniques and concluded with a clear call to continue the conversation. The hosts will continue to work with the participants to produce a white paper that will outline a prioritized list of recommendations to address...

Added:22 Sep 2015


Exploring the Challenges & Opportunities for Label-free Optical Imaging

This morning, OSA’s latest Incubator – the Incubator on Label-free Optical Techniques for Biomedical Diagnostics & Imaging: Challenges and Opportunities for Clinical Translation kicked-off. This meeting is hosted by Paul French, Imperial College, United Kingdom; Laura Marcu, University of California - Davis, USA; Robert J. Nordstrom, National Institute of Health, USA; Juergen...

Added:17 Sep 2015


Photobiomodulation – Next Steps

  The second day of the OSA’s Incubator on Photobiomodulation (PBM) began with a panel discussing the use of PBM in sports medicine. Ernesto Leal-Junior Ph.D., Professor, Nove Julho University, Sao Paulo, Brazil, talked about his lab’s attempt to systematically examine the modalities and mechanisms of PBM in sports rehabilitation. Edward Ryan, currently serving as a...

Added:02 Sep 2015


Photobiomodulation – Overcoming the Hurdles

 After a morning discussing how the technology, and community, have developed over the years, the afternoon of the Photobiomodulation Incubator began with a panel discussion on overcoming the hurdles facing Photobiomodulation (PBM). Panelists David Ozar Ph.D., Loyola University Chicago, Gail Siminovsky, CAE, Academy of Laser Dentistry, and Scot Faulkner, Kinexum Pharmaceuticals, discussed...

Added:01 Sep 2015


Photobiomodulation – where it started and where is it going?

  Today’s kick-off of the OSA’s second Photobiomodulation (PBM) Incubator brings together scientists, practitioners, and industry to discuss the latest research, future, and hurdles for PBM’s acceptance as a mainstream medical therapy.The day began with hosts Michael Hamblin Ph.D. and Donald Patthoff DDS introducing the goal of the Incubator: to come together to...

Added:31 Aug 2015


The Body Optic - Molecular Probes Save Lives

Colorectal cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in the world; in fact, the American Cancer Society estimates 96,830 new cases of colorectal cancer cases in the United States for 2014 alone. Barratt’s Esophagus, which is strongly associated with esophageal adenocarcinoma, affects up to 10% of patients suffering from long-term acid reflux. Diseased areas can be...

Added:01 Jul 2014


Some counterintuitive lessons learned from the OSA BIOMED meeting

With the conclusion of another BIOMED meeting, I once again left Miami impressed by the many excellent talks, clever imaging solutions, and novel biological insights.  I’ve appreciated the opportunity to share my thoughts about the conference through this blog, and in conclusion, I thought I would highlight three things that I was rather surprised to learn.

Added:06 May 2014


The integration of optical technologies to manipulate and monitor biological samples

This morning at the BIOMED meeting, there were back-to-back talks in the Optical Molecular Biophysics / Neurophotonics session that highlighted the unique insights that can be obtained by integrating different optical technologies. Anna-Karin Gustavsson from Dr. Caroline Adiels group gave an interesting talk that integrated multifluidics, optical trapping, and NADH autofluorescence measurements...

Added:29 Apr 2014


Speeding up multi-photon microscopy

As someone with strong research interests in multiphoton microscopy (MPM), I was excited to hear Dr. Peter So’s plenary talk on Day 3 of the BIOMED meeting. Dr. So provided an overview of the development of his multiphoton tissue cytometry equipment over the years, and its applications in neurobiology. MPM has emerged as key tool in neuroscience to non-invasively image deeper within the...

Added:29 Apr 2014


The OSA BIOMED Meeting Day 1: Things are heating up in Miami

Greetings from Miami! BIOMED has gotten off to great start with a pair of plenary talks by Dr. Xingde Li and Dr. Adam Wax. As I mentioned in a previous post, Dr. Li has been developing and refining endomicroscopic probes to facilitate non-linear optical microscopy in hard to reach places such as the kidney, intestine, and cervix. Dr. Wax, on the other hand, has taken a different approach to...

Added:28 Apr 2014


The Binding Finding of a Fluorescence Lifetime

In this afternoon’s session on Luminescence and Absorption on Cellular and Tissue Levels, Prof. Victor Chernomordik gave an overview of the extensive work he and his colleagues have been undertaking to make fluorescence molecular imaging more quantitative. Much of their work has focused specifically on how to quantify human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) concentrations (a key...

Added:27 Apr 2014


The Role of Chance in Biomedical Imaging

Much of my work as a postdoctoral trainee at Tufts University has focused on utilizing endogenous sources of optical contrast to assess tissue development and disease. To this end, our lab has utilized non-linear optical microscopy to non-destructively characterize tissue organization and metabolic function with an emphasis on understanding and detecting stem cell differentiation and...

Added:07 Apr 2014



Day 1 continued: Learning to See Through Walls

Is it possible to look inside an object using only light reflected off the front?  Can you transmit more light through an attenuating medium by making it even thicker?  Could a bank verify your identity using the pattern of light scattered off your teeth? 

Added:07 Mar 2014


Reducing Drug Trial Costs with Imaging Technology

95% of new cancer therapeutics fail to make it past Phase II clinical trials. This means that while it should only cost about $50 million per drug for FDA approval, incorporating the cost of failures leads to an estimated cost of $1 billion per drug (1), with a recent Forbes article suggesting that this number is considerably higher (2).So why are so many drugs failing in clinical trials?

Added:04 Mar 2014


How to fit a laser-scanning microscope into a 2mm diameter tube

Optical microscopy can provide high-resolution images of cellular morphology and matrix organization, which can be utilized to diagnose disease or trauma. However, achieving an adequate signal-to-noise ratio at imaging depths exceeding 1mm is very challenging.  As a result, the initial clinical applications for optical microscopy techniques have largely focused on skin pathology. ...

Added:28 Feb 2014


Pushing the limits of imaging resolution and penetration depth

The development of labeling techniques capable of providing customizable molecular specificity has made optical microscopy a fundamental technique in the biomedical research, and the standard compound microscope remains a fixture in just about any clinic or biomedical lab. The popularity of optical microscopy was also driven by the ability to provide resolution at the cellular level that...

Added:28 Feb 2014


It takes blood, sweat, and SERS to image single cells

Throw out those old dusty fluorescent molecules and welcome in the next generation of optical contrast agents. SERS (Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering/Spectroscopy) nanoparticles are sophisticated new contrast agents that offer some distinct advantages over conventional fluorescent molecules for investigating molecular biology.

Added:20 Feb 2014


Where would biomedicine be without optics?

Much of the emphasis in biomedical optics research has been placed on the clinical translation of our technologies -- and rightfully so!  As my fellow blogger Dr. Ken Tichauer indicates, the potential impact in the clinic is great and the future remains bright.  But as we gear up for OSA BIOMED 2014 in Miami, I will be excited to learn about some of the latest applications in basic...

Added:10 Feb 2014


Photoimmunotherapy (PIT) busts open the doors for drug delivery

Over the last decade alone, it is estimated that over $200 billion has been spent just by governments to fund cancer research [1]. Despite this enormous investment, the recently released 2014 World Heath Organization (WHO) Cancer Report suggests that cancer incidence rates and deaths from cancer are on the rise, both in more developed and less developed nations.

Added:06 Feb 2014


Beginning of a new era? Recent advances in biomedical optics light the way to long-awaited clinical translation

For decades biomedical optics has been touted as an ideal tool for diagnosing, monitoring and/or treating a vast array of health conditions owing to low-cost instrumentation, use of non-ionizing radiation, and incomparable sensitivity. All great characteristics; nonetheless, adoptions of optical devices in the clinic have been few and far-between. One could blame regulations, the high cost of...

Added:29 Jan 2014