Scaling Optical Fiber Communications: From Trans-Oceanic Cables to Chip-to-Chip Interconnects

Scaling Optical Fiber Communications: From Trans-Oceanic Cables to Chip-to-Chip Interconnects

Hosted By: Optics in Digital Systems Technical Group

6 February 2020, 9:00 - 10:00

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For decades, our ability to generate, process, and store digital information has been growing between 40% and 90% per year, driven by Moore’s Law. In contrast, our ability to transmit an information stream over various distance ranges has only been growing at around 20% per year, limited by the capabilities of electrical and optical communications technologies. This long-term scaling disparity is increasingly affecting the continued evolution of networking applications, from chip-to-chip interconnects to trans-oceanic fiber-optic cables.

Among the possible solutions, which also include ultra-broadband systems and signal carrier frequencies much beyond the infrared, massive spatial parallelism seems to be the only long-term sustainable and techno-economically attractive path forward. To be economically viable, though, spatial parallelism must embrace massive array integration across all system elements.

In this webinar hosted by the OSA Optics in Digital Systems Technical Group, Dr. Peter Winzer will review state of the art as well as future scaling options for optical communications systems, from chip-to-chip interconnects to submarine cables, taking into account all available classical (and quantum) degrees of freedom. By combining basic Shannon (and Gordon-Holevo) capacity scaling with technological and engineering limitations, we arrive at practically relevant directions for optical communications research and commercial product developments.

What You Will Learn:

  • The technology drivers behind digital communications applications and how they scale
  • The state of the art in optical fiber communications and the scalability issues
  • How close current optical communications technologies are to their classical and quantum limits
  • What options are available to scale optical communications for the coming 20 years


Who Should Attend:

  • Those interested in the evolution of digital communications technologies
  • Photonic subsystem and device engineers

About the Presenter: Peter J. Winzer, Nokia Bell Labs

Peter J. Winzer received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the Vienna University of Technology, Austria. Supported by the European Space Agency, he investigated photon-starved space-borne Doppler lidar and laser communications using high-sensitivity digital modulation and detection. At Bell Labs since 2000, he has focused on various aspects of high-bandwidth fiber-optic communication systems and networks and contributed to high-speed optical transmission records and field trials with interface rates from 10 Gbit/s to 1 Tbit/s. Since 2008 he has been investigating and internationally promoting spatial multiplexing to scale optical transport systems. He currently heads the global Optical Transmission Systems research efforts within Bell Labs. He has widely published and patented and is actively involved with the IEEE Photonics Society and OSA. Dr. Winzer served as Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE/OSA Journal of Lightwave Technology from 2013 to 2018. He was Program Chair of the 2009 European Conference on Optical Communications and Program Chair and General Chair of the 2015 and 2017 Optical Fiber Communication Conference. He is a Clarivate Highly Cited Researcher, a Bell Labs Fellow, a Fellow of IEEE and OSA, and an elected member of the US National Academy of Engineering. He holds an honorary doctorate from TU Eindhoven and received the 2018 John Tyndall Award for his work.Peter J. Winzer received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the Vienna University of Technology, Austria. Supported by the European Space Agency, he investigated photon-starved space-borne Doppler lidar and laser communications using high-sensitivity digital modulation and detection. At Bell Labs since 2000, he has focused on various aspects of high-bandwidth fiber-optic communication systems and networks and contributed to high-speed optical transmission records and field trials with interface rates from 10 Gbit/s to 1 Tbit/s. Since 2008 he has been investigating and internationally promoting spatial multiplexing to scale optical transport systems. He currently heads the global Optical Transmission Systems research efforts within Bell Labs. He has widely published and patented and is actively involved with the IEEE Photonics Society and the OSA. Dr. Winzer served as Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE/OSA Journal of Lightwave Technology from 2013 to 2018. He was Program Chair of the 2009 European Conference on Optical Communications and Program Chair and General Chair of the 2015 and 2017 Optical Fiber Communication Conference. He is a Clarivate Highly Cited Researcher, a Bell Labs Fellow, a Fellow of IEEE and OSA, and an elected member of the US National Academy of Engineering. He holds an honorary doctorate from TU Eindhoven and received the 2018 John Tyndall Award for his work.