Free-Space Volumetric Displays

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Free-Space Volumetric Displays

Hosted By: Display Technology Technical Group

6 June 2019, 14:00 - 15:00

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In this webinar hosted by the OSA Display Technology Technical Group, Dr. Daniel Smalley of Brigham Young University will present the three primary families of 3D display (i.e., 'ray', 'wave', and point' displays) and locate free-space volumetric displays within that taxonomy. The presenter will compare the three displays'

In this webinar hosted by the OSA Display Technology Technical Group, Dr. Daniel Smalley of Brigham Young University will present the three primary families of 3D display (i.e., 'ray', 'wave', and point' displays) and locate free-space volumetric displays within that taxonomy. The presenter will compare the three displays' respective advantages and disadvantages to those of light-field and holographic displays. Finally, Daniel will attempt to illustrate how free-space volumetric displays might fulfill, or even exceed, the 3D imaginings of science fiction. 

What You Will Learn:

  • How different types of advanced 3D displays work
  • The relative advantages of free-space volumetric displays
  • Future directions for free-space volumetric display 
  • How to make science fiction displays a reality 

Who Should Attend:

  • Individuals who have an interest in all types of advanced 3D displays

 

Presenter

Daniel Smalley, Brigham Young University

One late stormy night, a shrill cry pierced the darkness and Daniel Smalley was born. Daniel was a farmhand by day and an intrepid experiementer by night. He once used an old metal bucket, sand, and a computer fan to construct an aluminum furnance for melting pop-cans and old screen doors into machine tool parts. He built a number of circuits, a methane digester, wind-powered electrolysis machine, a laser and fine origami creations of various shapes and sizes. He experimented a great deal with holography; for this reason was led to attend MIT where he earned B.S., M.Eng, M.S., and Ph.D. degrees while working to create the world's first low-cost holographic video monitor. As a BYU professor, he continues to work in electroholography by fabricating new waveguide based modulators. Professor Smalley aspires to create large, high resolution, interactive holographic and volumetric displays. In addition, he is part of collaborations pursuing novel brain probes and tractor beam technologies.