18 July 2020 – 25 July 2020 University of Warsaw, Chęciny, Poland

Lecturers

Andrew Weiner

Purdue University, USA

Ultrafast Photonics Time-Frequency Signal Processing: Classical and Quantum

These lectures introduce analog signal processing approaches for manipulation of broadband and ultrafast optical signals. The first lecture focuses on pulse shaping and classical applications in ultrafast optics and radio-frequency photonics. The second lecture focuses on quantum applications, including manipulation and measurement of broadband time-energy entangled photons.

These lectures introduce analog signal processing approaches for manipulation of broadband and ultrafast optical signals. The first lecture focuses on pulse shaping and classical applications in...

About the Speaker

Andrew Weiner, the Scifres Family Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Purdue University, is best known for pioneering work on programmable femtosecond pulse shaping and ultrafast signal processing. His recent work concerns optical frequency combs as well as multi-frequency and time-frequency quantum optics, including integrated photonics quantum sources. Weiner is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and National Academy of Inventors, was selected as a Department of Defense National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellow, and has received the OSA R.W. Wood Prize, the OSA Adolph Lomb Medal, and the IEEE Photonics Society Quantum Electronics Award, among others. He is author of the textbook Ultrafast Optics and recently concluded a six-year term as Editor-in-Chief of Optics Express. In his 27 years on the faculty, he has graduated over 40 Ph.D. students.

Andrew Weiner, the Scifres Family Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Purdue University, is best known for pioneering work on programmable femtosecond pulse shaping...

Christine Silberhorn

Paderborn University, Germany

Quantum optics and information science in multi-dimensional networks

Photonic quantum systems, which comprise multiple optical modes as well as highly non-classical and sophisticated quantum states of light, have been investigated intensively in various theoretical pro¬posals over the last decades. The ideas cover a large range of different applications in quantum technology, spanning from quantum communication and quantum metrology to quantum simulations and quantum computing. However, the experimental implementations require advanced setups of high complexity, which poses a considerable challenge. The successful realization of controlled quantum network structures is key for the future advancement of the field. Here we present three differing approaches to overcome current limitations for the experimental implementation of multi-dimensional quantum networks: non-linear integrated quantum optics, pulsed temporal modes and time-multiplexing. Non-linear integrated quantum devices with multiple channels enable the combinations of different functionalities, such as sources and fast electro-optic modulations, on a single compact monolithic structure. Pulsed photon temporal modes are defined as field orthogonal superposition states, which span a high dimensional system. They occupy only a single spatial mode and thus they can be efficiently used in single-mode fibre communication networks. Finally, time-multiplexed quantum walks are a versatile tool for the implementation of a highly flexible simulation platform with dynamic control of the underlying graph structures and propagation properties.

Photonic quantum systems, which comprise multiple optical modes as well as highly non-classical and sophisticated quantum states of light, have been investigated intensively in various theoretical...

About the Speaker

Christine Silberhorn is a professor at Paderborn University, where she is leading a research group in the area of integrated quantum optics. Her interests cover novel optical technologies based on non-linear integrated devices including their fabrication and tailoring for new applications, and the exploration of ultrafast pulsed light as well as of time multiplexed quantum networks. She has contributed to the development of engineered quantum light sources and circuits using integrated optics and ultrafast pulsed lasers, the implementation of multichannel quantum networks for photon counting and quantum simulations, and the realization of quantum communication systems with bright light. She received her doctorate from the University of Erlangen in 2003, and worked as a postdoc at the University of Oxford from 2003 to 2004. From 2005 to 2010 she was a Max Planck Research Group Leader in Erlangen. Her research work has been awarded by several prizes; most prominently she received the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz-prize from the German Science Foundation in 2011 and a consolidator ERC-grant in 2017. In 2013 she has been elected as a member of the Leopoldina, National Academy of Science, and in 2018 as a Fellow of The Optical Society.

Christine Silberhorn is a professor at Paderborn University, where she is leading a research group in the area of integrated quantum optics. Her interests cover novel optical technologies based on...

Frank Wise

Cornell University, USA

Generation of Ultrashort Pulses in Fiber Lasers

Short-pulse (picosecond and femtosecond) fiber lasers have increasing impact in applications, owing to their practical benefits. The combination of a waveguide medium and diode pumping allows the design of robust, high-power (above 1000 watts) instruments. However, the waveguide medium also enhances nonlinear optical effects, and these often limit the performance of short-pulse fiber lasers. The goal of these lectures is to provide an introduction to short-pulse generation in fiber lasers and amplifiers. The lectures will begin with a tutorial and introductory description of the fundamental linear and nonlinear processes that underlie short-pulse generation in optical fiber. The most-important techniques for short-pulse generation will be discussed, and the performance will be compared to that offered by other technologies. The lectures will end with a brief introduction to recent advances in this area.

Short-pulse (picosecond and femtosecond) fiber lasers have increasing impact in applications, owing to their practical benefits. The combination of a waveguide medium and diode pumping allows the...

About the Speaker

Frank Wise received a BS degree in Engineering Physics from Princeton University, an MS degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of California at Berkeley, and a PhD in Applied Physics from Cornell University. Before PhD studies, he worked on advanced integrated circuits at Bell Laboratories. Since receiving the PhD in 1988, he has been on the faculty in Applied Physics at Cornell.

Frank Wise received a BS degree in Engineering Physics from Princeton University, an MS degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of California at Berkeley, and a PhD in Applied Physics...

Hui Cao

Yale University, USA

Physics and Application of Complex Lasers

Over the past sixty years, lasers have enabled major scientific and technological advancements, and have been exploited in numerous applications due to their advantages such as high brightness and high coherence. However, the high spatial coherence of laser illumination is not always desirable, as it can cause adverse artifacts such as speckle noise in imaging applications. Furthermore, the high-power broad-area lasers often suffer spatio-temporal instabilities that result from nonlinear interactions between the lasing modes and the active materials. We have developed novel lasers to suppress the spatio-temporal instabilities and to tune the spatial coherence of laser emission. Laser coherence control not only provides an efficient means for eliminating coherent artifacts, but also enables new applications.

Over the past sixty years, lasers have enabled major scientific and technological advancements, and have been exploited in numerous applications due to their advantages such as high brightness and...

About the Speaker

Hui Cao is the John C. Malone Professor of Applied Physics and of Physics, and a professor of Electrical Engineering at Yale University. She received her Ph.D. degree in Applied Physics from Stanford University in 1997. Prior to joining the Yale faculty in 2008, she was on the faculty of Northwestern University from 1997 to 2007. Her technical interests and activities are in the areas of mesoscopic physics, complex photonic materials and devices, nanophotonics, and biophotonics. She authored or co-authored one monograph, twelve book-chapters, seven review articles and 250 journal papers. She is a Fellow of the APS, OSA, AAAS and IEEE.

Hui Cao is the John C. Malone Professor of Applied Physics and of Physics, and a professor of Electrical Engineering at Yale University. She received her Ph.D. degree in Applied Physics from...

Maciej Wojtkowski

Institute of Physical Chemistry, Poland

From organs to cells - the challenges of modern biomedical imaging

One of the still unresolved problems in biological and medical imaging is the possibility of non-invasive visualization of living tissue (latin in vivo) with the accuracy of microscopic examination. This is particularly emphasized in the age of innovative microscopic techniques, which have the ability to optically select axial layers without the need to take and prepare samples. The main physical limitation of in vivo microscopic imaging is related to the light scattering introduced by the irregular and often discontinuous distribution of the refractive index. Light scattering induces strong modulation of the wavefront of the light back-scattered from the sample. As a consequence, the contrast of the reconstructed images is dramatically decreased by increased noise. Other side effects of the uneven distribution of the refractive index are significant deformations of measured objects on the reconstructed images. In addition, in the case of consistent laser illumination, there are so-called speckles - strong changes in the intensity of recorded light caused by interference of transverse modes of the laser beam. Speckle noise adversely affects system resolution and reduces image quality. Adding all these effects results in a serious loss of image information. In our work we try to solve these basic physical limitations by developing new imaging techniques that use partially coherent light with spatial-time modulation of the phase of the radiation used. Our research activities focus on developing new optical methods that enable biological objects to be imaged live and in a minimally invasive manner. We have come a long way in developing techniques for imaging objects of different sizes - from the scale of organs to the internal structure of a single cell.

One of the still unresolved problems in biological and medical imaging is the possibility of non-invasive visualization of living tissue (latin in vivo) with the accuracy of microscopic examination...

About the Speaker

Maciej Wojtkowski (b.1975) is active in the field of biomedical imaging. His research interest includes optical coherence tomography and low coherence interferometry applied to biomedical imaging. Dr Wojtkowski has significant impact on development of Fourier domain OCT (FdOCT) technique. The first FdOCT instrument for in vivo retinal imaging was designed and constructed by dr Wojtkowski and his colleagues from the Medical Physics Group at Nicolaus Copernicus University Poland in 2001. Dr Wojtkowski also contributed in development and construction of three clinical prototype high speed and high resolution OCT instruments which are in use in ophthalmology clinics: in Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Poland, New England Eye Center, Boston, USA, and UPMC Pittsburgh. He is an author of more than 160 publications including 90 full papers in peer reviewed journals. During his academic career Maciej Wojtkowski served short internships in Vienna University and University of Kent. He also worked for two years as postdoctoral fellow in joint project between Massachusetts Institute of Technology and New England Eye Center. Currently prof Wojtkowski is a head of the Department of Physical Chemistry of Biological Systems at Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences where he also leads his own research team (Physical Optics and Biophotonics Group).

Maciej Wojtkowski (b.1975) is active in the field of biomedical imaging. His research interest includes optical coherence tomography and low coherence interferometry applied to biomedical imaging...

Andrew White

University of Queensland, Australia

Abstract available soon.

About the Speaker

Coming Soon

Coming Soon

Nirit Dudovich

Weizmann Institute, Israel

Abstract available soon.

About the Speaker

Coming Soon

Coming Soon

Xian-Min Jin

Shanghai Jiao Tong University

Coming Soon

Abstract available soon.

About the Speaker

Coming Soon

Coming Soon

Jelena Pesic

Nokia Bell Labs

Coming Soon

Abstract available soon.

About the Speaker

Coming Soon

Coming Soon