Quantum Information and Measurement VI

01 November 2021 – 05 November 2021
Optica Virtual Event - Eastern Daylight/Summer Time (UTC - 04:00)

Plenary Speakers

Warwick Bowen

University of Queensland


Absolute Quantum Advantage in Bioimaging
The clarity of state-of-the-art microscopes is constrained by intensity limits imposed by biological photodamage. We use quantum correlations to overcome these otherwise absolute limits. This allows imaging of biological structures inaccessible using classical light.
The clarity of state-of-the-art microscopes is constrained by intensity limits imposed by biological photodamage. We use quantum correlations to overcome these otherwise absolute limits. This...

About the Speaker
Prof Bowen’s research focuses on the implications of quantum science on precision measurement, and applications of quantum measurement in areas ranging from quantum condensed matter physics to the biosciences. He is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Physics, Director of the University of Queensland Precision Technologies Translation Hub, and a Theme Leader of the Australian Centre for Engineered Quantum Systems. His lab has significant efforts in using quantum light and quantum-limited technologies to improve biological microscopy. They also have active research efforts on integrated photonics, quantum control of macroscopic mechanical devices, and superfluid helium physics. Prof Bowen’s research is supported by the Australian Research Council, the US Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Lockheed Martin, the US Army Research Office and the Australian Defence Science and Technology Group.
Prof Bowen’s research focuses on the implications of quantum science on precision measurement, and applications of quantum measurement in areas ranging from quantum condensed matter physics to the...

Akira Furusawa

The University of Tokyo and RIKEN


Large-scale Quantum Computing with Quantum Teleportation
Time-domain multiplexed one-way quantum computation is a method to overcome the problem of scalability of quantum computers. I will talk about the recent progress toward the realization of large-scale fault-tolerant universal quantum computers.
Time-domain multiplexed one-way quantum computation is a method to overcome the problem of scalability of quantum computers. I will talk about the recent progress toward the realization of large...

About the Speaker
Akira Furusawa received his BS and MS degrees in applied physics and Ph.D. degree in physical chemistry from The University of Tokyo, Japan, in 1984, 1986, and 1991, respectively. His research interests cover the area of nonlinear optics, quantum optics, and quantum information science. He is currently Professor of Applied Physics, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo and the Deputy Director of RIKEN Center for Quantum Computing. Professor Furusawa has authored more than 100 papers in leading technical journals and conferences, which include the first realization of continuous-variable quantum teleportation. He received the Ryogo Kubo Memorial Award in 2006, the JSPS prize in 2007, the Japan Academy Medal in 2007, the International Quantum Communication Award in 2008, the Toray Science and Technology prize in 2015, and the Medal with purple ribbon in 2016.
Akira Furusawa received his BS and MS degrees in applied physics and Ph.D. degree in physical chemistry from The University of Tokyo, Japan, in 1984, 1986, and 1991, respectively. His research...

Luis L. Sánchez-Soto

Universidad Complutense de Madrid


Achieving the Ultimate Timing Resolution
Accurate time-delay measurement is at the core of many modern technologies. I will show new quantum schemes able to estimate the time offset between ultra-short pulses at the quantum limit.
Accurate time-delay measurement is at the core of many modern technologies. I will show new quantum schemes able to estimate the time offset between ultra-short pulses at the quantum limit.

About the Speaker
Luis L. Sánchez-Soto received his MSc in Physics (1984) and a PhD in Physics (1988) from the Complutense University of Madrid. He has been visiting researcher at numerous Universities. He has been a full professor of Quantum Optics in Madrid since 2002. In 2009, he joined the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, in Erlangen, where he led the theoretical group in the Division of Optics and Information, headed by Gerd Leuchs. His main research interests are quantum optics and quantum information.
Luis L. Sánchez-Soto received his MSc in Physics (1984) and a PhD in Physics (1988) from the Complutense University of Madrid. He has been visiting researcher at numerous Universities. He has...

Lorenza Viola

Dartmouth College


Advances in Quantum Metrology under Correlated Quantum Noise
Realizing the full potential of quantum metrology demands that the impact of realistic noise sources be accounted for. I will address entanglement-assisted frequency estimation in the presence of temporally correlated ("non-Markovian") dephasing noise that is also spatially correlated and non-classical. I will first show how, under this kind of noise, uncontrolled entanglement among the qubit sensors, mediated by the environment, generally introduces additional uncertainty and superclassical precision scaling is precluded. I will then discuss our progress in devising strategies for countering these effects and restoring metrological advantage, by both tailoring the sensors’ spatial locations and leveraging active quantum-control techniques.
Realizing the full potential of quantum metrology demands that the impact of realistic noise sources be accounted for. I will address entanglement-assisted frequency estimation in the presence of...

About the Speaker
Lorenza Viola is a theoretical physicist specializing in quantum information science. Following a “Laurea” (MS) degree in physics from the University of Trento, Italy, in 1991, and a Ph.D. in theoretical physics from the University of Padua, Italy, in 1996, she has been a postdoctoral fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology until 2000 and then a J. R. Oppenheimer Fellow at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In 2004, she joined the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Dartmouth College, where she is now the James Frank Family Professor of Physics. Her research interests cover a range of topics within quantum information physics and quantum statistical mechanics — including methods for noise characterization and control in open quantum systems and quantum computation, quantum sensing and metrology, quantum phase transitions and topological phases of matter. She is a board member of the International Physics and Control Society and is presently serving as a Divisional Associate Editor for Physical Review Letters. For her contributions, she has been elected a Fellow of the American Physical Society in 2014.
Lorenza Viola is a theoretical physicist specializing in quantum information science. Following a “Laurea” (MS) degree in physics from the University of Trento, Italy, in 1991, and a Ph.D. in...

Philip Walther

University of Vienna


Quantum Photonics for Quantum Machine Learning and Secure Computing
This talk presents recent experimental demonstrations that use integrated nanophotonic processors for various quantum computations such as quantum machine learning and in particular reinforcement learning, where agents interact with environments by exchanging signals via a communication channel. We show that this exchange allows boosting the learning of the agent. Another experiment underlines the feasibility of photonic quantum system for secure quantum computing by enabling homomorphic encryption and probabilistic one-time programs for classical computing. As outlook I will discuss technological challenges for the scale up of photonic quantum computers, and our group’s current work for addressing some of those.
This talk presents recent experimental demonstrations that use integrated nanophotonic processors for various quantum computations such as quantum machine learning and in particular reinforcement...

About the Speaker
Philip Walther is Professor of Physics at the University of Vienna, Austria. His research is dedicated to the development of advanced of quantum technology for applications in quantum information processing and for investigations in quantum science. The experiments are focused on photonic quantum computation and quantum simulation as well as quantum foundations such as indefinite causal structures and the measurement of weak gravitational effects on single photons using table-top setups. He is Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS) and the Optical Society of America (OSA), and member of the Young Academy of the Austrian Academy of Sciences. Image: © Barbara Mair
Philip Walther is Professor of Physics at the University of Vienna, Austria. His research is dedicated to the development of advanced of quantum technology for applications in quantum information...