14 September 2020 – 17 September 2020 OSA Virtual Event - Eastern Daylight Time (UTC - 04:00)

Presentation Schedule

Meet the Keynote Speakers

Ignacio Cirac

Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics

Quantum Algorithms for Finite Energies and Temperatures

I will introduce two quantum algorithms to determine finite energy and temperature properties of many-body quantum systems [1]. The first one obtains the desired result in polynomial time in the number of qubits. The other one uses the quantum computer as a subroutine for a Monte Carlo method and avoids the so-called sign problem. Both of them can be used with NISQ and analog quantum simulators. [1] S. Lu, M.C. Banuls, and J.I. Cirac, arXiv:2006.03032

I will introduce two quantum algorithms to determine finite energy and temperature properties of many-body quantum systems [1]. The first one obtains the desired result in polynomial time in the...

About the Speaker

Born in Manresa, Spain. In 1988, he graduated in Theoretical Physics from the Complutense University, Madrid, and gained his PhD in 1991. Between 1991 and 1996, he was Associate Professor at the University of Castilla-La Mancha. From 1996 until 2001 he was Professor of Theoretical Physics at the University of Innsbruck, Austria. Since 2001 he is the director of the Theory Division at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics and Honorary Professor at the Technical University of Munich. The focus of his research work is the quantum theory of information and quantum optics. With his colleague Peter Zoller, he made the first proposals to build quantum computers, quantum simulators, and quantum repeaters using atoms, ions, photons and other physical systems. He also introduced basic concepts and techniques in quantum information theory and, in particular, in entanglement theory. In the last years, he introduced the tensor networks states called PEPS, developed their theory, and related the entanglement of a many-body quantum system with the possibility of describing it efficiently.

Born in Manresa, Spain. In 1988, he graduated in Theoretical Physics from the Complutense University, Madrid, and gained his PhD in 1991. Between 1991 and 1996, he was Associate Professor at the...

Marissa Giustina

Google AI Quantum

Building Google’s Quantum Computer

The Google AI Quantum team develops chip-based circuitry that one can interact with (control and read out) and which behaves reliably according to a simple quantum model. Such quantum hardware holds promise as a platform for tackling problems intractable to classical computing hardware. While the demonstration of a universal, fault-tolerant, quantum computer remains a goal for the future, it has informed the design of a prototype with which we have recently controlled a quantum system of unprecedented scale. This talk introduces Google’s quantum computing effort from both hardware and quantum-information perspectives, including an overview of recent technological developments and results.

The Google AI Quantum team develops chip-based circuitry that one can interact with (control and read out) and which behaves reliably according to a simple quantum model. Such quantum hardware...

About the Speaker

Dr. Marissa Giustina is a senior research scientist and quantum electronics engineer in the Google AI Quantum hardware team. She joined Google’s quantum computing research effort in 2016, and much of her work since then has focused on developing and deploying the technological infrastructure needed to scale up the team’s quantum processors by an order of magnitude in qubit number. Prior to Google, Dr. Giustina worked at the Austrian Academy of Sciences in the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, where she designed, built, and published a “loophole-free” experiment testing Bell’s inequality using entangled optical photons.

Dr. Marissa Giustina is a senior research scientist and quantum electronics engineer in the Google AI Quantum hardware team. She joined Google’s quantum computing research effort in 2016, and much...

Mikhail Lukin

Harvard University

Programmable Quantum Systems for Simulations, Computation and Networking

Realization of quantum systems that may be capable of outperforming the existing classical counterparts in executing useful tasks is a central challenge in quantum science and engineering. In this talk, I will describe two related examples of our recent work towards these goals. In the first example, I will describe the recent advances involving programmable, coherent manipulation of quantum many-body systems using atom arrays excited into Rydberg states. I will describe our recent technical upgrades that now allow the control over 200 atoms in two-dimensional arrays. Recent progress involving the exploration of exotic many-body phenomena, as well as realization and testing of quantum optimization algorithms using such systems, will be discussed. In the second example, I will report on our progress towards realization of quantum repeaters for long-distance quantum communication. Specifically, I will describe experimental realization of memory-enhanced quantum communication, which utilizes a solid-state spin memory integrated in a nanophotonic diamond resonator to implement asynchronous Bell-state measurements. This enables a four-fold increase in the secret key rate of measurement device independent quantum key distribution over the loss-equivalent direct-transmission method while operating at megahertz clock rates. Prospects for scaling up these techniques, including realization of larger quantum processors and quantum networks will be discussed.

Realization of quantum systems that may be capable of outperforming the existing classical counterparts in executing useful tasks is a central challenge in quantum science and engineering. In...

About the Speaker

Mikhail Lukin received the Ph.D. degree from Texas A&M University in 1998. He has been a Professor of Physics at Harvard since 2004, where he is currently co-Director of the Harvard Quantum Initiative in Science and Engineering and co-Director of the Harvard-MIT Center for Ultracold Atoms. He has co-authored over 400 technical papers and has received a number of awards, including the Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, David and Lucile Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering, NSF Career Award, Adolph Lomb Medal of the Optical Society of America, AAAS Newcomb Cleveland Prize, APS I.I.Rabi Prize, Vannevar Bush Faculty Fellowship, Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics, and the Willis E. Lamb Award for Laser Science and Quantum Optics. He is a fellow of the OSA, APS, and AAAS and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Mikhail Lukin's research is in the areas of quantum optics and quantum information science. His current interests include quantum manipulation of atomic and nanoscale solid-state systems, quantum metrology and its applications, quantum nonlinear optics and nanophotonics. He and his group are developing new techniques for controlling strongly interacting photons, ultracold atoms, and solid-state atom-like systems. These techniques are used to study fundamental physical phenomena associated with quantum dynamics of many-body systems and to facilitate implementation of novel applications in quantum information processing, quantum communication and quantum metrology. These include realization and studies of novel quantum states of matter away from equilibrium, realization of quantum computers and quantum networks, and development of nanoscale quantum sensors with applications ranging from material science to biological imaging. In the course of this work they are also exploring the new scientific interfaces between quantum optics, atomic physics, condensed matter and information science.

Mikhail Lukin received the Ph.D. degree from Texas A&M University in 1998. He has been a Professor of Physics at Harvard since 2004, where he is currently co-Director of the Harvard Quantum...

Grégoire Ribordy

ID Quantique

Quantum Technologies for Long-Term Data Security

Quantum computing poses a major threat to the most commonly deployed public key cryptography algorithms, which are key building blocks of our information security infrastructure. With advances in the field of quantum computing, it becomes important to upgrade this infrastructure to use approaches with a resistant to this threat. One approach is to use quantum technologies, such as quantum key distribution and quantum random number generation, in combination with traditional cryptographic techniques in order to enhance their resilience. In this presentation, we will review the current state of the art of practical quantum key distribution and quantum random number generators and discuss current areas of research. We will also present examples of applications and use cases.

Quantum computing poses a major threat to the most commonly deployed public key cryptography algorithms, which are key building blocks of our information security infrastructure. With advances...

About the Speaker

Grégoire Ribordy studied physics at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, where he obtained his master in 1995 with a specialization in optics. Passionate about applications of science and technology, he then decided to join industry and had the opportunity to work in the R&D department of Nikon Corp. in Tokyo, Japan. During his 18 months stay in this country, Ribordy also learned to speak Japanese. Upon his return to Switzerland, Ribordy decided to go back to academia to obtain his PhD, but he was careful to select a research group with strong ties to applications and from which start-ups had already been spun off. He thus joined the Group of Applied Physics of University of Geneva and worked in the field of quantum cryptography under the guidance of Prof. Nicolas Gisin and Hugo Zbinden. After obtaining his PhD in 2000, he decided to start a company in October 2001– ID Quantique – to pursue the commercial opportunities of quantum technologies in the field of secure communications. The company was the first to bring products such as quantum random number generators and quantum cryptography to the market. In 2007 in a world premiere, ID Quantique’s quantum cryptography solution was used to secured communication between two datacenters in Geneva, Switzerland. ID Quantique currently has a staff of about 100 employees and is the world leader in the field of quantum-safe cryptography. In October 2016, Ribordy has been appointed to the High-Level Steering Group set up by the European Commission to provide advice on its Quantum technologies strategy. In October 2017, Ribordy, along with other ID Quantique co-founders Profs. Nicolas Gisin and Hugo Zbinden, received the Innovation Medal of the University of Geneva. More recently, in September 2018, he has been selected as one of the 100 Digital Shapers (people who lead digitalization of the country) in Switzerland. Ribordy has co-authored more than 25 scientific papers and is listed as an inventor on more than 10 patents. Ribordy is also the recipient of several awards for technology entrepreneurship such as the 2001 New Entrepreneurs in Technology and Science Prize or the 2002 de Vigier Award for Young Swiss Entrepreneurs.

Grégoire Ribordy studied physics at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, where he obtained his master in 1995 with a specialization in optics. Passionate about applications of...