Siegman All Stars

 

Your 2021 All Stars

Moderators

Jens Biegert

ICFO - Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Spain

Moderator

Eric Rosas

Clúster Mexicano de Fotónica, Mexico

Moderator

Speakers

Tim Carrig

Lockheed Martin, USA

About

Tim Carrig is Director of Optical Sensing & Laser Technologies for the Lockheed Martin (LM) Advanced Technology Center. The group has expertise in optics, detector and receiver technology, photonics, laser radar, electro-optical devices, solid-state lasers, thermal systems, and avionics and control systems. Prior to joining LM, Dr. Carrig was Director of Research & Development at Coherent Technologies, Inc. (CTI), a small business that merged with LM in 2005. Dr. Carrig joined CTI in 1995 as a research scientist after completing a postdoctoral tour at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). At LANL, he conducted research in the areas of THz radiation physics and solid-state laser development. In 1992 Dr. Carrig served as an instructor for the School of Electrical Engineering at Cornell University, where he taught a senior/graduate level laser physics course. Dr. Carrig graduated from Cornell in 1992 with a Ph.D. in Applied Physics and a minor in Quantum Electronics. Dr. Carrig has designed and built laser sources in the ultraviolet, visible, and infrared spectral regions; has five patents; and over 75 refereed publications and presentations. Since 2004 he has taught a short course on laser remote sensing in many forums including, in 2019, as a Guest Lecturer at the Siegman International School for Lasers. Currently, Dr. Carrig is a member of the University of Rochester Trustees’ Visiting Committee for the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Dr. Carrig has been an OSA Fellow since 2010 and has been a registered Patent Agent since 1999. Dr. Carrig has been privileged to serve as an OSA volunteer for a number of years including six as a Topical Editor for Optics Letters. He has also served as Chair of the OSA Fellows Committee, as Chair of the Charles Hard Townes Award Committee, as Chair of the CLEO Joint Committee on Applications, and as CLEO Steering Committee Chair. Additionally, Dr. Carrig has served on a number of conference program committees including as Chair of Advanced Solid-State Photonics and as CLEO Chair for both the Science & Innovations and Applications & Technology program elements.

Tim Carrig is Director of Optical Sensing & Laser Technologies for the Lockheed Martin (LM) Advanced Technology Center. The group has expertise in optics, detector and receiver technology...

Halina Rubinsztein-Dunlop

University of Queensland, Australia

About

Halina Rubinsztein-Dunlop is Professor of Physics in the School of Mathematics and Physics at the University of Queensland. She was educated at the University of Gothenburg and Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden. She is a Director of Quantum Science Laboratory and was for 9 years Head of School of Mathematics and Physics. At the University of Queensland Halina leads a large research groups in experimental quantum atom optics, laser micromanipulation and nanooptics. She also leads a program in the ARC Centre of Excellence in Engineered Quantum Systems. Halina is known for her work on optical angular momentum of light and optical tweezers. Her research groups study the field of optics and quantum atom optics and in particular of optical angular momentum. Their contributions include first observation of transfer of orbital angular momentum to micron sized object which enables driving and spinning micron sized machines by all optical means and contact free. Halina has been awarded Australian Institute of Physics International Woman in Physics, Lecture Tour Medal and University of Queensland Award for Excellence in Research Higher Degree Supervision. Halina is a Fellow of Australian Academy of Science, a Fellow of SPIE and of OSA. Rubinsztein-Dunlop has published over 250 papers that have received over 7300 citations in the world’s leading scientific journals. She has supervised a large number of PhD students many of whom today conduct state-of-the-art research in many parts of the world. Halina is also actively involved in popularisation and promotion of science.

Halina Rubinsztein-Dunlop is Professor of Physics in the School of Mathematics and Physics at the University of Queensland. She was educated at the University of Gothenburg and Chalmers University...

Katarina Svanberg

Lund University, Sweden

About

Katarina Svanberg is an M.D. and a Ph.D and holds a professorship in Oncology at Lund University, Sweden as well as at South China Normal University in Guangzhou, China. She started her research career by studying laser light interaction in biological tissue and is among the early clinical researchers in biomedical optics and photonics for medical applications. Her PhD thesis in Medical Science presented preclinical research work within experimental photodynamic therapy and tissue spectroscopy. The post doc research activity was focussed on clinical applications of the preclinical achievements. Katarina Svanberg has combined her clinical activity with research work and thus been able to introduce a new cancer treatment modality in Oncology (Photodynamic Therapy) at the Lund University Hospital. She has been a key person in the collaboration in between several clinics and departments at Lund University in introducing and applying laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy for early tumour detection. Katarina Svanberg has also been involved in developing a new method for gas monitoring; Gas in Scattering Media Absorption Spectroscopy (GASMAS) in the human body and this technique has been applied in the diagnosis of sinusitis. GASMAS also seems promising for in situ real time surveillance of preterm babies controlling their lung function. She has been active in transferring spectroscopic biomedical techniques to the third world and has also been involved in clinical work in Africa. Katarina Svanberg has coauthored more than 150 peer reviewed papers and contributed with book chapters in the field and also organized many international conferences in Biomedical Optics. She is a board member of the Lund Laser Centre and since 1993 she has served as the director of the Lund University Medical Laser Centre, where she now is the chair of the Board. Katarina Svanberg is a board member at the UNESCO International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in Trieste, Italy and has been a member in many international advisory committees including at FDA and NIH in the US. She was a member of the steering committee for the UNESCO proclaimed Year of Light 2015. During the period 2005-2008 she was a director at large of the Board of the International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE) and during the period 2009-2012 in the presidential chain of the society where she served as the President of SPIE in 2011. She is a fellow of SPIE and of the Electromagnetic Research Society (PIERS). She was awarded the National Institute of Health (NIH) Lifetime Achievement Award in Biophotonics for Pioneering Work 2015 and the SPIE Gold Medal 2017.

Katarina Svanberg is an M.D. and a Ph.D and holds a professorship in Oncology at Lund University, Sweden as well as at South China Normal University in Guangzhou, China. She started her research...

Donna Strickland

University of Waterloo, Canada

About

Donna Strickland is a professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Waterloo and is one of the recipients of the Nobel Prize in Physics 2018 for developing chirped pulse amplification with Gérard Mourou, her PhD supervisor at the time. They published this Nobel-winning research in 1985 when Strickland was a PhD student at the University of Rochester. Strickland earned a B.Eng. from McMaster University and a PhD in optics from the University of Rochester. Strickland was a research associate at the National Research Council Canada, a physicist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and a member of technical staff at Princeton University. In 1997, she joined the University of Waterloo, where her ultrafast laser group develops high-intensity laser systems for nonlinear optics investigations. Strickland served as the president of the Optical Society (OSA) in 2013 and is a fellow of OSA, SPIE, the Royal Society of Canada and the Royal Society. She is an honorary fellow of the Canadian Academy of Engineering and the Institute of Physics and an international member of the US National Academy of Science. Strickland was named a Companion of the Order of Canada.

Donna Strickland is a professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Waterloo and is one of the recipients of the Nobel Prize in Physics 2018 for developing chirped pulse...

Roel Baets

Ghent University, Belgium

About

Roel Baets is full professor at Ghent University where he leads a mixed UGent – imec team. He received MSc degrees from Ghent University and from Stanford University, and a PhD degree from Ghent University. He has also held part-time faculty positions at Delft University of Technology and at Eindhoven University of Technology. For more than 35 years Roel Baets has worked in the field of integrated photonics, in multiple material platforms (silicon, silicon nitride, III-V). He has made diverse scientific contributions to this field, as well as to its applications and spin-off creation in telecom, datacom and sensing. He has led major research projects in silicon photonics in Europe and founded ePIXfab, the globally first Multi-Project-Wafer service for silicon photonics and now the European Silicon Photonics Alliance. In recent years his research has focused on medical and environmental sensing applications of silicon photonics. Roel Baets is an ERC grantee of the European Research Council and a Methusalem grantee of the Flemish government. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, of the European Optical Society (EOS) and of the Optical Society (OSA). He is also a member of the Royal Flemish Academy of Belgium for Sciences and the Arts. He has been a recipient of the 2011 MOC award, of the 2018 PIC-International Lifetime Achievement Award and of the 2020 John Tyndall award.

Roel Baets is full professor at Ghent University where he leads a mixed UGent – imec team. He received MSc degrees from Ghent University and from Stanford University, and a PhD degree from Ghent...

Kishan Dholakia

University of Adelaide, Australia

About

Kishan Dholakia is Professor at the University of St Andrews, Scotland and an honorary adjunct Professor at the Centre for Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona, USA and at Chiba University, Japan. He works on advanced imaging for neuroscience and cancer diagnosis, beam shaping and optical manipulation leading a group of around 20 researchers. He has published over 290 journal papers and has in excess of 24,000 citations. His work is cited in the Guinness Book of World Records 2015. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, OSA and SPIE. In 2016 he won the R.W. Wood Prize of the Optical Society, in 2017 he won the IOP Thomas Young Medal and Prize and is the 2018 recipient of the SPIE Dennis Gabor Award.

Kishan Dholakia is Professor at the University of St Andrews, Scotland and an honorary adjunct Professor at the Centre for Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona, USA and at Chiba University...

Sune Svanberg

Lund University, Sweden

About

Sune Svanberg obtained his PhD from University of Gothenburg in 1972, and is since 1980 professor of physics at Lund University, Lund, Sweden. During 30 years he was head of the Atomic Physics Division, and during 20 years director of the Lund Laser Centre. Since 2011 he is also a distinguished professor at the South China Normal University, Guangzhou. He is a member of the Royal Academy of Sciences (and during 10 years a member of its Nobel Committee for Physics; two years as chairman), and the Royal Academy of Engineering Sciences. His research interests include laser spectroscopic applications to the environmental, food safety and biomedical fields.

Sune Svanberg obtained his PhD from University of Gothenburg in 1972, and is since 1980 professor of physics at Lund University, Lund, Sweden. During 30 years he was head of the Atomic Physics...