08 April 2020

The health and safety of OSA Meetings attendees is always of primary importance, and especially so in our current environment.

OSA continues to monitor developments with COVID-19 (Coronavirus) and its impact on upcoming events. We are currently working with volunteer organizers for this meeting on a solution that benefits speakers, attendees and exhibitors while ensuring the well-being of all participants. This approach does require time, and we appreciate your patience in waiting for an announcement on future plans.


 

Katie Bouman

California Institute of Technology, USA

Title to be Announced

Abstract available soon.

About the Speaker

Katie Bouman is an assistant professor in the Computing and Mathematical Sciences Department at the California Institute of Technology. Before joining Caltech, she was a postdoctoral fellow in the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. She received her Ph.D. in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at MIT in EECS. Before coming to MIT, she received her bachelor's degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Michigan. The focus of her research is on using emerging computational methods to push the boundaries of interdisciplinary imaging.

Katie Bouman is an assistant professor in the Computing and Mathematical Sciences Department at the California Institute of Technology. Before joining Caltech, she was a postdoctoral fellow in the...

David J. Brady

Duke University, USA

Defining the Digital Camera

Conventionally “the camera” is well defined, it consists of a lens to form an image and a sensor to measure the image. In the modern camera, however, the image is formed computationally rather than by the lens. The camera consists of a variety of sensor resources, potentially including lens and sensor arrays with various forms of active illumination and 3D sensing. Camera designers must select these resources within size, weight, cost and power budgets to maximize the quality of computed media. While this approach creates design challenges, it also enables 100x increases pixel count per unit volume, 100x decreases in operational power per pixel and dramatic improvements spatial, spectral, temporal and range resolution. This talk reviews design strategies for heterogeneous sensor array cameras and analyzes system performance for various recent designs.

Conventionally “the camera” is well defined, it consists of a lens to form an image and a sensor to measure the image. In the modern camera, however, the image is formed computationally rather than...

About the Speaker

David J. Brady is the Fitzpatrick Professor of Photonics at Duke University. In 2012, Professor Brady led the team that built the world’s first terrestrial gigapixel camera. He subsequently founded Aqueti, Inc., which manufactures array cameras. Brady has also worked on numerous applications of compressive measurement and computational imaging, in 2013 he was awarded the SPIE Denis Gabor Award for the development of compressive holography. His recent work focuses on the use of compressive measurement and artificial intelligence to improve data quality and quantity in parallel cameras; focusing on the ultimate goal of handheld gigapixel cameras. Brady is a fellow of OSA, SPIE and IEEE.

David J. Brady is the Fitzpatrick Professor of Photonics at Duke University. In 2012, Professor Brady led the team that built the world’s first terrestrial gigapixel camera. He subsequently founded...