Hands-on Introduction to Data Analytics and Machine Learning in Optical Networks

Tuesday, 30 July, 12:30 – 14:00 (time subject to change)
Bayside Room


In this workshop/tutorial, the audience will be guided through the first steps necessary for applying data analytics and machine learning to optical networks. We will begin with a brief introduction to the fundamentals of data analytics and machine learning. We will then focus on representative optical networking use cases suitable for the application of machine learning. Using the available development tools (e.g., Jupyter Lab), the attendees will be encouraged to explore a previously defined dataset using their laptops. The workshop will enable the participants to perform data importing and selection (e.g., removing samples with missing features), as well as visualizing the dataset characteristics. Normalization techniques will be discussed and applied to the dataset. Then, the attendees will explore the correlation between the different features of the dataset. An unsupervised learning algorithm will be applied to the dataset, followed by a supervised learning algorithm that will build upon the information learned from the unsupervised approach. The tutorial will be concluded with an interactive discussion on the remaining challenges and ideas for extensions.

Quantum Technologies Symposium

Wednesday, 31 July 2019, 08:00 - 16:00
Grand Peninsula Ballroom EF

Quantum technology is maturing, with fields like quantum computing and quantum key distribution approaching commercialization. First quantum computers are being made available to the general public and quantum key distribution systems are being deployed. Quantum computers promise a significant increase in the speed at which complex mathematical problems can be solved. As a result, numerous classical encryption algorithms used in telecommunication are in danger of being easily broken. Next to “post-quantum cryptography”, quantum key distribution (QKD) has been proposed as a solution to ensure secure communication in the era of quantum computing. Most systems shown so far are laboratory prototypes to prove the general concept and to build first QKD links, whose stringent requirements for a successful deployment in commercial networks are yet to be addressed. Transforming QKD into a widely deployable technology entails major challenges that require close interaction between the quantum and the telecommunications community. The long history and deep knowledge of classical communication principles from the latter group can support the commercialization of the theoretical findings of the former, leading to more elegant and simpler solutions for future quantum systems.

This symposium will provide an introduction to quantum technologies and a platform to improve collaboration and understanding between the classical communication community and the quantum community. Quantum researchers, classical communication researchers and telecome operators will provide  a broad range of insights.

Symposium: A Light in Digital Darkness: Optical Wireless Communications to Connect the Unconnected

Tuesday, 30 July 2019, 19:00 - 21:00
Grand Peninsula Ballroom EF

The role of Internet and Communication Technology (ICT) in bringing about a revolution in almost all aspects of human life needs no introduction. It is indeed a well-known fact that the transmission of information at a rapid pace has transformed all spheres of human life such as education, health, and economy to name a few. Despite this tremendous advantages that come with ICT, it is a fact that almost 4 billion people in the world are still “unconnected or under-connected” or suffer from the “digital/connectivity divide,” a term coined in order to emphasize the lack of communications infrastructure in many parts of the world. In this symposium, top experts will offer ways to provide high speed connectivity in rural areas along with efficient and cost-effective backhauling methods for rural traffic. In particular, Free Space Optical Communications (FSOC)-based solutions for both: (i) integrated satellite-airborne-ground networks providing global coverage and connectivity and (ii) terrestrial mesh/multi-hop directive networks connecting far-flung regions of the state will be discussed and debated.