The OSA Advanced Photonics Congress Plenary Session will feature prominent speakers from a variety of disciplines related to the congress. More speakers will be added as the committees develop the program.

Raman Kashyap

Polytechnique Montréal, Canada

State of the Art Ultra-long FBGs for Linear and Nonlinear Applications: Challenges and Opportunities

For four decades, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) have delivered outstanding performance for applications in many fields of engineering and science, including sensing, lasers, dispersion management, and filters. However, most FBGs for these applications have been confined to lengths of less than 100mm. Recent developments have led to a demand for longer gratings (~meter length) in applications such as Raman and Brillouin distributed feedback FBG lasers. Until recently, controlling the spatial characteristics of the FBG with a precision necessary for these applications has been difficult to achieve, since small errors accumulate leading to unpredictable and unrepeatable characteristics. These errors make it impossible to utilise long FBGs for linear and nonlinear applications routinely. By undertaking a step by step approach to understand the limitations of not only the technology of FBG inscription, but surprisingly, also from the uniformity of the optical fiber has led to near perfect ultra-long gratings. Although challenges remain, these advances have allowed the fabrication of single frequency fiber Raman and Brillouin DFB lasers with outstanding performance, also opening the doors to other nonlinear optical applications.

For four decades, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) have delivered outstanding performance for applications in many fields of engineering and science, including sensing, lasers, dispersion management, and...

About the Speaker

Raman Kashyap is a Professor at Polytechnique Montreal with a dual appointment in the Departments of Engineering Physics and Electronics Engineering, a holder of a Canada Research Chair in Future Photonics Systems since 2003, and the head of the FABULAS Laboratory. He was previously the Head of a photonics company in Montreal, Corvis Canada Inc. At BT Research Laboratories in the UK for 25 years, he researched optical devices and applications in photonics, and discovered the optical "fiber fuse". He was the first to demonstrate how photonics could be integrated into cell-phones in 2014 (Making smart phones smarter with photonics, Optics Express), and according to OSA, with a potential media coverage of 19 million. He is the author of the first book on Fiber Bragg Gratings published in 1999, 550 technical papers and 44 patents.

His current research interests are focused on laser induced cooling, nonlinear optics, sensors, fiber Raman DFB lasers, Stimulated Brillouin scattering, Plasmonics, integrating photonics into cell-phones, and perfecting ultra-long fiber gratings. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Sciences of the Royal Society of Canada, the Optical Society of America, the SPIE, the Engineering Institute of Canada, the Canadian Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Physics (UK).

Raman Kashyap is a Professor at Polytechnique Montreal with a dual appointment in the Departments of Engineering Physics and Electronics Engineering, a holder of a Canada Research Chair in Future...

Michal Lipson

Columbia University, USA

Next Generation Photonics based on 2D Materials

Two dimensional materials such as monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) are expected to have large changes in their optical sheet conductivity by controlling their carrier densities. We demonstrate a platform for waveguide-integrated phase modulators in the near-infrared regime based on Tungsten disulphide (WS2) gating.

Two dimensional materials such as monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) are expected to have large changes in their optical sheet conductivity by controlling their carrier densities. We...

About the Speaker

Professor Michal Lipson joined the Electrical Engineering faculty at Columbia University in July 2015. She completed her B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Physics at the Technion in 1998 followed by a Postdoctoral position at MIT in the Materials Science Department until 2001. In 2001 she joined the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Cornell University. She was named Cornell Given Foundation Professor of Engineering in 2013. Lipson was one of the main pioneers in the field of silicon photonics and is the inventor of several of the critical building blocks in the field including the GHz silicon modulator. She holds over 20 patents and is the author of over 200 technical papers. Professor Lipson's honors and awards include the MacArthur Fellow, Blavatnik Award, IBM Faculty Award, and the NSF Early Career Award. She is a fellow of OSA and IEEE. Since 2014 she has been named by Thomson Reuters as a top 1% highly cited researcher in the field of Physics.

Professor Michal Lipson joined the Electrical Engineering faculty at Columbia University in July 2015. She completed her B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Physics at the Technion in 1998 followed by...

Lukas Novotny

ETH Zurich, Switzerland

Levitated Optomechanics

Optically levitated nanoparticles in ultrahigh vacuum exhibit very low damping and constitute a highly sensitive optomechanical system. By using active parametric feedback the particle's center-of-mass temperature can be cooled below 100 microKelvin, limitedby photon recoil heating.

Optically levitated nanoparticles in ultrahigh vacuum exhibit very low damping and constitute a highly sensitive optomechanical system. By using active parametric feedback the particle's center...

About the Speaker

Lukas Novotny is a Professor of Photonics at ETH Zürich. His research is focused on understanding and controlling light-matter interactions on the nanometer scale. Novotny did his PhD at ETH Zürich and from 1996-99 he was a postdoctoral fellow at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, working on new schemes of single molecule detection and nonlinear spectroscopy. In 1999 he joined the faculty of the Institute of Optics where he started one of the first research programs with focus on nano-optics. Novotny is the author of the textbook 'Principles of Nano-Optics', which is currently in its second edition. He is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Lukas Novotny is a Professor of Photonics at ETH Zürich. His research is focused on understanding and controlling light-matter interactions on the nanometer scale. Novotny did his PhD at ETH Zürich...

Martin Schell

Heinrich Hertz Institute, Germany

Photonic Integration for Communication and Sensing-Economic Success and Failure

Photonic Integration has the chance to revolutionize photonics probably as much as electronic integration has done since the 1970ies. Prior failures and successes will be analyzed, and current technologies and developments will be overviewed.

Photonic Integration has the chance to revolutionize photonics probably as much as electronic integration has done since the 1970ies. Prior failures and successes will be analyzed, and current...

About the Speaker

Martin Schell is professor for Optic and Optoelectronic Integration at Technical University Berlin, and director of the Fraunhofer Heinrich Hertz Institute HHI, Berlin. His research interest is photonic integration for communication and sensing.

Martin Schell joined HHI in 2005. From 2000 to 2005, he was first product line manager, then head of production and procurement at Infineon Fiber Optics. From 1996 to 2000 he was management consultant at The Boston Consulting Group. Before that, he spent one year as a visiting researcher at The Tokyo University, Japan. He received the Dipl.-Phys. degree from the RWTH Aachen in 1989, and the Dr. rer. nat. degree from the Technical University Berlin in 1993.

Martin Schell is a board member of EPIC (European Photonics Industry Consortium), speaker of the board of OptecBB (Competence Network Optical Technologies Berlin/Brandenburg), member of the Photonics21 Board of Stakeholders, and member of the Public Policy Committee of The Optical Society.

Martin Schell is professor for Optic and Optoelectronic Integration at Technical University Berlin, and director of the Fraunhofer Heinrich Hertz Institute HHI, Berlin. His research interest is...

Linda Thomas

Naval Research Laboratory, USA

Progress and Challenges in Free-space Optical Networks

Free space optics (FSO) technology allows access to currently unregulated spectrum; and provides an augmentation to RF wireless in congested areas.  In order to more broadly adopt the technology, FSO must be implemented as a networked wireless system, versus simply a point-to-point link.

Free space optics (FSO) technology allows access to currently unregulated spectrum; and provides an augmentation to RF wireless in congested areas.  In order to more broadly adopt the...

About the Speaker

Linda Thomas is a Senior Research Engineer in the Electro-optics Technology Section, Code 8123, of the Naval Center for Space Technology, at the U. S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in Washington, D.C. She has been working at NRL since 2004. Her current research interests are free-space laser communications, hybrid optical and RF communications networks, satellite laser ranging, and single photon detectors.

Dr. Thomas received her Bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering from Duke University, Durham, NC, and has a Master’s degree and Doctorate in the field of Electrical Engineering from the University of Maryland, College Park. She was an Associate Editor of the IEEE Journal of Lightwave Technology from 2014-2016, and prior Conference Chair of the SPIE Conference on Atmospheric Propagation.
 

Linda Thomas is a Senior Research Engineer in the Electro-optics Technology Section, Code 8123, of the Naval Center for Space Technology, at the U. S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in Washington,...

Peter Winzer

Nokia Bell Labs, USA

Scaling Optical Networks into the Next Decade and Beyond

Informed by long-term historic traffic and technology scaling, we extrapolate the evolution of optical networking technologies into the next decade and beyond, highlighting the challenges that research will have to address.

Informed by long-term historic traffic and technology scaling, we extrapolate the evolution of optical networking technologies into the next decade and beyond, highlighting the challenges that...

About the Speaker

Peter J. Winzer received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the Vienna University of Technology, Austria, in 1998. Supported by the European Space Agency (ESA), he investigated photon-starved space-borne Doppler lidar and laser communications using high-sensitivity digital modulation and detection. At Bell Labs since 2000, he has focused on various aspects of high-bandwidth fiber-optic communication systems, including Raman amplification, advanced optical modulation formats, multiplexing schemes, and receiver concepts, digital signal processing and coding, as well as on robust network architectures for dynamic data services. He contributed to several high-speed and high-capacity optical transmission records with interface rates from 10 Gb/s to 1 Tb/s, including the first 100G and the first 400G electronically multiplexed optical transmission systems and the first field trial of live 100G video traffic over an existing carrier network. Since 2008 he has been investigating and internationally promoting spatial multiplexing as a promising option to scale optical transport systems beyond the capacity limits of single-mode fiber. He currently heads the Optical Transmission Systems and Networks Research Department at Bell Labs in Holmdel, NJ. He has widely published and patented and is actively involved in technical and organizational tasks with the IEEE Photonics Society and The Optical Society (OSA). Dr. Winzer is a Clarivate Highly Cited Researcher, the only one from industry in the Engineering category in 2015, a Bell Labs Fellow, a Fellow of the IEEE and the OSA, and an elected member of the US National Academy of Engineering. He received a Thomas Alva Edison Patent Award in 2017 and is the recipient of the 2018 John Tyndall Award.

Peter J. Winzer received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the Vienna University of Technology, Austria, in 1998. Supported by the European Space Agency (ESA), he investigated photon-starved...