News Releases


OSA News Releases

Welcome to the OSA News Releases page. This page contains news from The Optical Society, including research highlights from OSA's journals, conference news, award announcements and more. Sort releases by category below to see all the news releases in a particular area.

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Using a tiny device known as an optical antenna, researchers have created an X-ray sensor that is integrated onto the end of an optical fiber just a few tens of microns in diameter. By detecting X-rays at an extremely small spatial scale, the sensor could be combined with X-ray delivering technologies to enable high-precision medical imaging and therapeutic applications.

The Optical Fiber Conference and Exhibition (OFC), held at the Los Angeles Convention Center, has concluded with 663 exhibiting companies, over 1,100 peer-reviewed papers and 14,500 attendees. OFC is the world’s leading conference and exhibition for optical communications and networking professionals.

A new fabrication process could make it easier and less expensive to incorporate optical sensing onto lab-on-a-chip devices. These devices integrate laboratory functions onto a plastic or glass “chip” typically no more than a few square centimeters in size, allowing automated testing in the doctor’s office or various types of chemical or biological analysis with portable instruments.

The Optical Society (OSA) expresses concern for funding levels included in today’s proposed Fiscal Year 2018 budget by U.S. President Donald Trump for science-related programs at federal agencies. President Trump’s proposed budget will ultimately be up to the U.S. Congress effectively appropriate and draft the legislation to fund the federal government for Fiscal Year 2018.

A silicon optical switch newly developed at Sandia National Laboratories is the first to transmit up to 10 gigabits per second of data at temperatures just a few degrees above absolute zero. The device could enable data transmission for next-generation superconducting computers that store and process data at cryogenic temperatures. Although these supercomputers are still experimental, they could potentially offer computing speeds ten times faster than today’s computers while significantly decreasing power usage.

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