Nonlinear Metamaterials Incubator


Nonlinear Metamaterials Incubator

30 September - 2 October 2015
OSA Headquarters, 2010 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington, DC, USA

Hosted by
Natalia LitchinitserState University of New York at Buffalo, United States


Program Overview

The possibility of designing the optical nonlinear response of metamaterials at the level of the individual meta-atom opens up a whole new way to obtain materials with a large, fast, and broadband nonlinear response. To date, most studies of enhanced nonlinear response in designed materials have essentially exploited strong local field enhancements enabled by plasmonic nanostructures. The purpose of this Incubator, partially funded by ARO, is to explore methods to create materials with enhanced nonlinear coefficients by using the fundamental design parameters available in meta-atoms and metamaterials. Its goal will be to establish new directions for the development and testing of these new optical metamaterials.
 

Background

For decades, scientists have been exploring ways of creating materials with a large, fast, and broadband nonlinear response. Some success in this area has been achieved in the microwave frequency range, but designing and fabricating such materials in the optical frequency range would revolutionize nonlinear optics, leading to low-power, compact, and ultra-fast applications of nonlinear optical phenomena. The emergence of metamaterials has a potential to provide a breakthrough in the development of such materials. By selecting certain 'building block materials' and rationally designing them on a scale of nanometers, it should be possible to create composite electromagnetic media with properties vastly different from their individual constituents and suitable for the realization of certain functionalities.
 
Since it has already been demonstrated that linear optical properties, such as dielectric permittivity, magnetic permeability, and refractive index of metamaterials can be designed to be positive, negative or even zero at any selected frequency by properly adjusting the dimensions, periodicity and other properties of the so-called meta-atoms (the unit cells of metamaterials), it is expected that designs can also be achieved that will transform the nonlinear properties of metamaterials. Indeed, the nonlinear properties of conventional materials are limited by the properties of their constituent components-atoms and molecules. The rapidly growing field of metamaterials opens unprecedented opportunities to overcome those limitations.
 

Featured Topics/Questions

  • Physical reasons for the limited nonlinear response of existing natural and artificial structures?

  • What is the path to overcome these limitations and create highly nonlinear materials with a good figure of merit?

  • How can we design meta-atoms that would produce optical materials with large nonlinearities and good figure of merit?

  • Novel applications that would be enabled by such matematerials-based highly nonlinear structures.


Sponsors


Confirmed Participants (as of 9-25-15)
Alejandro Aceves, Southern Methodist University, United States
Luca Alloatti, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, United States
Christos Argyropoulos, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, United States
Mikhail Belkin, University of Texas Austin, United States
Arthur Davoyan, California Institute of Technology, United States
Domenico de Ceglia, National Research Council - AMRDEC, United States
Nader Engheta, University of Pennsylvania, United States
Andrey Fedyanin, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia
Liang Feng, State University of New York at Buffalo, United States
Jesse Frantz, NRL, United States
Richard Hammond, Army Research Office, United States
Joseph Haus, University of Dayton, United States
Ortwin Hess, Imperial College London, United Kingdom
Jonathan Hu, Baylor University, United States
Martti, Kauranen, Tampere University of Technology, Finland
Jacob Khurgin, Johns Hopkins University, United States
Mark Kuzyk, Washington State University, United States
Mikhail Lapine, University of Technology Sydney, Australia
Benjamin Lawrie, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, United States
Vladimir Liberman, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, United States
Natalia Litchinitser, State University of New York at Buffalo, United States
Chicheng Ma, State University of New York at Buffalo, United States
Maiken Mikkelsen, Duke University, United States
Joseph Miragliotta, Johns Hopkins University, United States
Arji Nachman, AFOSR, United States
Mikhail Noginov, Norfolk State University, United States
Kevin O'Brien, University of California Berkeley, United States
Viktor Podolskiy, UMass Lowell, United States
Ekaterina Poutrina, Air Force Research Laboratory, United States
Martin Richardson, University of Central Florida, United States
Clara Rivero-Baleine, University of Central Florida, United States
Ilya Shadrivov, Australian National University, Australia
Vladimir Shalaev, Purdue University/Birck Nanotechnology, United States
Mikhail Shalaev, State University of New York at Buffalo, United States
Maxim Shcherbakov, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia
David Shrekenhamer, Johns Hopkins University APL, United States
Salih Silahli, State University of New York at Buffalo, United States
David Smith, Duke University, United States
Jingbo Sun, State University of New York at Buffalo, United States
Zheng Jie Tan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, United States
Jason Valentine, Vanderbilt University, United States
Wiktor Walasik, State University of New York at Buffalo, United States
Jake Yeston, AAAS, United States
Nikolay Zheludev, University of Southampton UK/ NTU Singapore, United Kingdom


Meeting Schedule (All times approximate and subject to change, check back for agenda.)

The program, including breakfasts and lunches, will be held at OSA Headquarters, 2010 Massachusetts Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20036. Diners, which are also included in the registration, will be held at local restaurants.

 
Day 1: Wednesday, 30 September 2015
  • Dinner, location to be determined, at 18:00
 
Day 2: Thursday, 1 October 2015
  • Breakfast begins at 8:00 at OSA headquarters
  • Program begins at 8:30, lunch is included onsite
  • Dinner, location to be determined, begins at 18:00
 
Day 3: Friday, 2 October 2015
  • Breakfast begins at 8:00
  • Program begins at 8:30, lunch is included onsite
  • Program adjourns at 15:00 


Are you interested in attending?

A limited number of spots have been set aside at this invitation only meeting for interested individuals to apply for. Please send a brief letter of interest along with a CV to the hosts at osaincubator@osa.org.
 

Additional Information

This page will provide you with information on receiving a letter of invitation if required for your visa as well as additional logistical and area information.