Traveling Lecturer Directory

Hernando Garcia

Contact:
Southern Illinois University
Assistant Professor
Department of Physics
Edwardsville, Illinois 62026-1654
USA
Tel: 618-650-2474
Fax: 618-650-3556
hgarcia@siue.edu

Discussion Topic:

  • General Area of Ultrafast Optics and Optoelectronics
    Ultrafast photophysics and nonlinear optical properties of bulk, nanoclustered, and quantum well semiconductor structures, ultrashort pulse propagation in fibers, nonlinear modulation spectroscopy.

Speaker Credentials:

Professional Preperation

  • New Jersey Institute of Technology Newark, NJ, Physics B.S.
  • Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, Physics, M.S.
  • Rutgers/NJIT, Newark, NJ, Applied Physics, Ph.D.

Appointments

  • 2004 – Present Assistant Professor, SIUE, Edwardsville, IL
  • 2000 – 2002 Member of Technical Staff, Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, NJ
  • 1987 – 2000 Member of Technical Staff, Bell Laboratories, AT&T, NJ

Research Interests

General area of ultrafast optics and optoelectronics – ultrafast photophysics and nonlinear optical properties of bulk, nanoclustered, and quantum well semiconductor structures, ultrashort pulse propagation in fibers, nonlinear modulation spectroscopy.

Professional Affliation

Optical Society of America, American Physical Society, National Society of Hispanic Physicist.

Publications

  • H. Garcia, A. M. Johnson, F. A. Oguama and S. Trivedi, “New approach to the measurement of the nonlinear refractive index of short (<25 m) lengths of silica and erbium-doped fibers,” Opt. Lett. 19, 1796 (2003).
  • F. A. Oguama, H. Garcia, A. M. Johnson, “Simultaneous measurement of the Raman gain coefficient and the nonlinear refractive index of optical fibers: theory and experiment,” J. Opt.  Soc. Am., B22, No. 2, 426, (2005).
  • F. A. Oguama, A. Tchouassi, H. Garcia, and A. M. Johnson, “Numerical Modeling of the Induced Grating Autocorrelation (IGA) for studying optical fiber nonlinearities,” Appl. Phys. Lett., 86(8),  (2005).
  • H. Garcia, , F. A. Oguama, A. M. Johnson, and S. Trivedi, “Pump Induced Nonlinear Refractive Index Change, In Erbium and Ytterbium Doped Fibers -Theory and Experiment,” Opt. Lett 30, 1261 (2005).
  • H. Garcia, “Tunneling assisted two-photon absorption: The Nonlinear Franz-Keldysh Effec,” Phys. Rev. B, 74, 035212-1 (2006).
  • H. Garcia, A. M. Johnson, and S. Trivedi, “Photorefractive Beam-Coupling Measurement of the Nonlinear refractive Index of Semiconductor Films,”  Phys. Stat. Sol. (b) 220, 47 (2000).
  • M. Dinu, F. Quochi, and H. Garcia, “Third-order nonlinearities in silicon at telecom wavelengths,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, (18), pp. 2954-2956, 2003.
  • H. Garcia and R. Kalyanaraman “Phonon-assisted two-photon absorption in the presence of a dc-field: the nonlinear Franz-Keldysh effect in indirect gap semiconductors,” J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39, 1 (2006)
  • H. Garcia “The convolution theorem in nonlinear optics,” Submitted to Phys. Rev. B.
  • C. Favazza, J. Trice, H. Krishna, R. Sureshkumar, H. Garcia, and R. Kalyanaraman, “Nanoparticle Ordering by Dewetting of Co on SiO2,”  J. Elec. Mat. 35, 1618 (2006).
  • H. Garcia, Hare Krishna, and Ramki Kalyanaraman, “A New Figure of Merit for Photonic Applications of Metal Nano-Composites,” Appl. Phys. Lett, 89, 1 (2006).
  • H. Garcia, , J. Trice , R. Kalyanaraman, and R. Sureshkumar “Self-consistent determination of plasmonic resonances in ternary nanocomposites,” Phys. Rev. B. 75, 1 , (2007).
  • L Longstreth-Spoor, J Trice, H Garcia, C Zhang, and R. Kalyanaraman, “Nanostructure and microstructure of laser-interference-induced dynamic patterning of Co on Si,” J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39 (2006) 5149–5159.

Papers presented at Conferences

  • Nonlinear optical properties of silicon nanoclusters made by laser ablation, Paper QW A7 (p. 88) CLEO/IQEC 1998, San Francisco, CA.
  • Photorefractive Beam Coupling - A new Approach to the measurement of the nonlinear Refractive Index of Short (<25 m) Lengths of Silica and Erbium-doped Fibers, Paper Ctu V7 (p. 209)CLEO/QELS 1999, Baltimore, MD.
  • Photorefractive Autocorrelation Measurement of the Nonlinear Refractive index in Silica Fibers, Ibero-American Conference on Optics, Lasers, and Applications 1998, Cartagena, Colombia.
  • Photorefractive Beam Coupling measurement of the Nonlinear Refractive index of semiconductor Films, Paper WLL 104 (p. 124) 1999 OSA Annual Meeting, Santa Clara, Ca.
  • Nonlinear Refractive Index of Semiconductor Films, paper M03-4 (p. 39) 15th Latin American Symposium on Solid State Physics 1999, Cartagena, Colombia.
  • Photorefractive beam coupling measurement of the nonlinear refractive index (n2) of Erbium-doped fibers as a function of Germania (GeO2), Paper WCC1 (p. 106), 2000 OSA Annual Meeting, Rhode Island..
  • The Nonlinear Optical Properties of Silicon Nanocluster Made by Laser Ablation and Ion Implantation, Paper Ctu E6 (p. 123)CLEO/QELS 2001, Baltimore, MD.
  • Pump Induced nonlinear refractive index change in Erbium and Ytterbium doped fibers-theory and experiments, Paper Cw J2 (p. 351)CLEO/QELS 2001, Baltimore, MD.
  • Photorefractive Beam Coupling Measurement of n2 in Erbium-Doped Fibers as a function of Germania and Aluminium Contents, Paper CW A54 (p. 303)CLEO/QELS 2001, Baltimore, MD.
  • An Infrared Amplitude Modulator Based on Electrical Creation of Intersubband Transitions, NATO-ARW on Intersubband Transitions in Quatum Wells, 1991, Corsica, France.
  • E. Lalanne, H. Garcia, A. M. Johnson, S. Vijayalakshmi, H. Grebel, “Nonlinear optical properties of silicon nanoclusters made by laser ablation”, Paper QW A7 (p. 88) CLEO/QELS 1998, San Francisco, CA.
  • E. Lalanne, H. Garcia, A. M. Johnson, S. Vijayalakshmi, H. Grebel, “The Nonlinear Optical Properties of Silicon Nanocluster Made by Laser Ablation and Ion Implantation,” Paper Ctu E6 (p. 123)CLEO/QELS 2001, Baltimore, MD.
  • H. Garcia, “Tunneling assisted two-photon absorption: The Nonlinear Franz-Keldysh Effect,” in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science and Photonic Applications, Systems and Technologies 2005 (Optical Society of America, Washington, DC, 2005), JWB81, CLEO/QELS 2001, Baltimore, MD.
  • H. Garcia, and R. Kalyanaraman “Phonon-Assisted Two-Photon Absorption in the Presence of a DC-Field: The Nonlinear Franz-Keldysh Effect in Indirect Gap Semiconductors” in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science and Photonic Applications, Systems and Technologies 2006 (Optical Society of America, Washington, DC, 2005), JThC22, CLEO/QELS 2006, Long Beach, CA.

Conferences, Invited Talks and Workshops

  • Introduction to Nonlinear Optics, Workshop,  Summer 2005, University of Quindio, Colombia S.A.
  • Introduction to Nanotechnology,  Plenary Talk, Nov 2005, La Salle University, Bogota, Colombia S.A.
  • Principles of Optical Communications, Plenary Talk, Nov 2005, Distrital University, Bogota, Colombia S.A.
  • Mixing Rules in Ternary Nanocomposites, Plenary Talk, X ENO, Nov 2006, Valle University, Cali, Colombia S.A.
  • Tunneling Assisted Two Photon Absorption: The Nonlinear Franz-Keldish Effect, Condensed Matter Seminar, Nov 2005, Washington University, St. Louis.

Patents

“Optical Performance Monitoring Using Optical Autocorrelation” patent by M. Dinu, H. Garcia, D. Kilper, H. R. Stuart, C. Xu, Dinu 2-1-1-49-6-6.

Collaborators (48 Months)

A. M. Johnson (U. Maryland); D. DiGiovanni (OFS, Fitel Labs); E. Lalanne (U. Maryland); M. Tahayi (U. Nevada); Dr. S. B. Trivedi (Brimrose Corporation); M. Dinu (Bell Labs); F. A. Oguama (Jersey City U); D. Kilper (Bell Labs); H. R. Stuart (Bell Labs); H. Grebel (NJIT). R.Sureshkumar, R.  Kalyanaraman (Washington University in St. Louis)

Synergistic Activities

  • Construction of an Electromagnetic Pulse Simulator while performing research at AT&T Bell Laboratories.
  • Developed a quantum well optical modulator base on GaAs-GaAlAs-GaAs semiconductor while performing research at AT&T Bell Laboratories, Funded by DARPA.
  • Developed a theory for semiconducting layers base on hot electron regime while performing research at AT&T Bell Laboratories.
  • Worked on optical channel monitoring base on two photon absorption in SI-APD while performing research at Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies.
  • Developed an innovative technique to characterize the nonlinear optical properties of optical fibers while performing research at New Jersey Institute of technology.
  • Extensive teaching activities in both formal (classroom) and informal settings.

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Vladimir I. Gavrilenko

Contact:
Center for Materials Research
Norfolk State University
700 Park Avenue, Norfolk, VA 23504
USA
Tel: 757-823-8052
Fax: 757-823-9054
vgavrilenko@nsu.edu
http://www.nsu.edu

Discussion Topics

Recent monograph presents a good overview in the field of the optics of nanomaterials that is in the alley of my research interests:
V. I. Gavrilenko, Optics of Nanomaterials, Pan Stanford Publishing, World Scientific, 2011, http://www.panstanford.com/books/9789814241090.html ).

Dr. Vladimir is fluent in German, Ukrainian, and Russian.

1600.0160   Code Materials Optics
240.4350     Nonlinear Optics at Surfaces
190.1900     Diagnostics Applications of Nonlinear Optics
160.4236)   Optics of Nanomaterials 

Speaker Credentials:

Dr. Vladimir I. Gavrilenko is an associate research professor in the Center of Materials Research at Norfolk State University, Norfolk VA. He obtained his Ph.D. in 1979 and DSc in 1990 from the National Academy of Science of Ukraine. He is working in the field of computational materials science including first principle studies of equilibrium atomic geometries, structural transformations, linear and non-linear optical properties of different solid and soft condensed materials, physics and chemistry on surfaces and interfaces. He is an author and co-author of more then 100 scientific publications including two books and a patent, member of APS (life member) and OSA, served as a member of organizing committees of several domestic and international conferences and meetings.

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Fellow

Azriel Genack

Contact:
Queens College of CUNY
Department of Physics
Flushing, NY 11367
USA
Tel: 718-997-3373

Discussion Topics:

  • Photon Localization
  • Photonics of Chiral Structures

Speaker Credentials:

Professional Preparation

  • Columbia College, Mathematics, B.A., 1964
  • Columbia University, Physics, Ph.D., 1973
  • City College of CUNY, Raman scattering in solids, Postdoc, 1973-75
  • IBM Research Laboratory, Coherent Optical Transients, Postdoc, 1975-77

Appointments

  • 1994, Distinguished Professor of Physics, Queens College of CUNY
  • 1999, Scientific Advisor, Chiral Photonics
  • 1984-1994, Professor of Physics, Queens College of CUNY
  • 1977-1984, Senior Staff Physicist, Corporate Research Laboratories, Exxon Research
  • 1968-1973, Research Fellowship, Columbia University
  • 1965-1967, Teaching Fellowship, Columbia University

Academic and Professional Recognition:

Senior Fulbright Fellow 1999, Fellow, American Physical Society 1993, Fellow, Optical Society of America, 2007, Hewlett-Packard Best Paper Opto99 Award, Queens College Presidential Research Award 1992-93, Queens College Scholar in Residence Award – 1991, Exxon Corporation Award for discovering origin of surface enhanced Raman scattering – 1982, IBM Outstanding Innovation Award for Laser Frequency Switching – 1977.

Synergistic Activities

  • Worked to make the Optical Society of America a forum for scientists in the field of Waves in Random and Periodic Media: Co-chair of first OSA Topical Meeting on “Photonic metamaterials: from random to periodic,” held in the Bahamas in June 2006, first Chair of OSA Technical Group on Waves in Random and Periodic Media, 2002-2004, Organized Symposium on this topic for OSA Annual Meetings 2002- 2006, Topical Editor for Statistical and Mesoscopic Optics for Optics Letters 1998 – 2002, Member Science and Engineering Council of OSA, 2002-2004.
  • Cofounder of Chiral Photonics, Inc. in 1999 to develop photonic applications of chirality including lasing in cholesteric liquid crystals and chiral optical fiber. The company is located in New Jersey and presently has 12 employees.
  • Advisory Boards of French National Research Group on Imaging, Communications and Disorder 03–07 and Reconstituted Department of Physics of N.Y. Polytechnic University 06. Served on numerous scientific committees for international and national meetings on Waves in Random and Periodic Media outside the context of OSA, including CLEO/QELS, 2003; NATO ASI on Wave Scattering in Complex Media, Cargese, France, 2002, and Waves and Imaging through Complex Media, 1999, Cargese, France.
  • Maintain active high school research program on wave propagation. Four participants were semifinalists in the Westinghouse–Intel Scholarship Program.

Research Interests:

Statistics of waves in random and periodic media: observed photon localization and correlation and found the fundamental parameters that chart the transition from diffusive to localized waves for steady state and pulsed propagation; Chiral structures: discovered band-edge lasing in chiral liquid crystals and polarization selective chiral fibers; One of three founders of Chiral Photonics Inc., which seeks to exploit chirality for novel optical fiber lasers, polarizers and filters; Random lasing in diffusive and localized media; Acousto-optic tomography for imaging objects in homogeneously disordered background.

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Fellow

Julio C. Gutiérrez-Vega

Contact:
Optics Center
Tecnológico de Monterrey,
Av. Garza-Sada 2501
Monterrey, 64849
México
Tel: 52-818-328-184   
juliocesar@itesm.mx
http://homepages.mty.itesm.mx/jgutierr/

Discussion Topics:

  • Non-diffracting Optical Beams: Theory and Applications
  • Ince-Gaussian Beams and the Unification of the Hermite and Laguerre-Gaussian Beams
  • The Paradigm of the Fractionalization of Optical Beams

Speaker Credentials:

Julio C. Gutiérrez-Vega (B.Sc. in Physics, 1991; MSc. in Electrical Enginerring, 1995) obtained a Ph.D. in Optics from the National Institute for Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics (México) in 2000.  In 2001 he joined as associate professor to the Physics Department at Tecnológico de Monterrey, México. In 2005 he was promoted to full professor and was named director of the Optics Center of the same institute. He has authored and co-authored over 66 journal papers related to beam propagation in linear and non-linear media and a similar number of contributions to international conferences. He is member of OSA and SPIE and serves as associate editor of the OSA journal Optics Express

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Fellow

Guzman

Angela M. Guzman

Contact:
CREOL, The College of Optics and Photonics,
University of Central Florida
PO Box 162700,
4000 Central Florida Blvd,
Orlando, FL 32816-2700, USA
Tel: +1 (561) 313-8204
Angela.Guzman@creol.ucf.edu
http://www.creol.ucf.edu/People/Details.aspx?PeopleID=9962

Discussion Topics:

  • Quantum Optics: Quantum states of light and Quantum tomography. Quantum interference, NOON states and applcaitions to quantum imaging.
  • Applications of Non-Markovian quantum dynamics to cold atom quantum reflection and quantum logic gates based on neutral atoms.

Speaker Credentials

Angela M. Guzmán joined the College of Optics and Photonics, CREOL, University of Central Florida, Orlando in 2011, as a Visiting Associate Professor for the next two years. Her recent research activities include high-dimensional quantum cryptography, the theory of physical realizations of quantum logic gates, and the study of interatomic forces in the presence of electromagnetic fields. She was Research Associate Professor at the Physics Department of Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton during 2007-2011, where she collaborated with Engineering Faculty to establish research on optical imaging. She was the director of the Pan American Advanced Studies Institute on Frontiers in Imaging Science, an activity supported by the National Science Foundation, held on June 2011 at the National University of Colombia in Bogota, and intended to foster international collaboration between young researchers in new imaging methods, with special emphasis on bioimaging.

Prof. Guzman is the Coordinator of the UNESCO Workshop on Active Learning in Optics and Photonics (ALOP) in Latin America. She is Professor Emeritus of the Physics Department at the National University of Colombia, where she graduated as a physicist, obtained her M. Sc. degree in Physics, and worked for over 25 years. She obtained her Dr. Sc. degree from the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich for research conducted at the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics in Garching, Germany, and did conducted post-doctoral research at the Optical Sciences Center of the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona.

In 1988, as a young scientist, she was awarded the Colombian “Third World Academy of Science” Prize. In 1989 she was appointed Regular Associate Member of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy. She is the recipient of the 1992-93 “Sarwar Razmi” Prize of the ICTP. In 1998 she was elected a member of the Colombian Academy of Science and became Senior Associate of the ICTP. Since 2008 she chairs the Advisory Group for the Trieste System on Optical Sciences and Applications, which provides advice to the ICTP in the area of optics.

Professor Guzmán Chaired the International Council of the Optical Society of America and served as a Member of that Society’s Board of Directors during the period 2003-2004. From 2005 to 2008 she served as a Vice President of the International Commission for Optics (ICO) and as a Member of the ICO Bureau. In 2007 she was made Fellow of the Optical Society of America for her contributions to quantum and atom optics and for the promotion of optics in developing countries. In 2010, during the commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Department of Physics of the National University of Colombia, she received an award as a distinguished alumna of the Department.

Since 2008 she is the ICO Secretary General, serving until 2014, and she also serves as the editor of the ICO Newsletter.

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Rami Haddad
Rami Haddad

Contact:
414 Myrtle Crossing Ln.
Statesboro, GA 30458
USA
Tel: 952-221-8138
rhaddad@georgiasouthern.edu

Website
ceit.georgiasouthern.edu/electrical-engineering/faculty/dr-rami-haddad/

Discussion Topic:

  • (060.2330 Fiber optics communications
  • 060.4250 Networks
  • 060.4256 Networks, network optimization
  • 000.2060

Speaker Credentials:

Assistant Professor at Georgia Southern University, earned his PhD in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Akron in 2011. His research interests include optical communication transmission, optical modulation techniques, optical networks, dynamic bandwidth allocation for Ethernet Passive Optical Networks (EPONs), bandwidth forecasting algorithms, and engineering education.

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Fellow

 

G. Ronald Hadley

Contact:
Tel: 505-844-4015  
USA
grhadle@sandia.gov  
grhadley46@comcast.net

Discussion Topics:

  • Numerical simulation of optoelectronic devices, active/passive integrated optics components
  • Finite Difference methods and derivation of finite difference equations
  • Numerical simulation techniques under separate cover

Speaker Credentials:

G. Ronald Hadley was born on Nov. 25, 1946 in Memphis, Tennessee, USA. He received his B. A. degree in physics from Wichita State University in 1968, and the Ph.D. (also in physics) from Iowa State University in 1972. Since graduation he has been employed at Sandia National Laboratories where he has pursued a wide variety of research interests. He has authored or co-authored over 80 publications, most involving computer simulations of diverse phenomena such as current flow in high-voltage vacuum diodes, two-phase flow of liquids through porous media, and the operation of solid-state and gas lasers. Since 1985 his research has centered in the area of photonics, and two-thirds of his publications have dealt with the numerical modeling of diode lasers and diffractive waveguide optics components. His most important recent contributions include new higher-order-accurate finite-difference algorithms for beam propagation, waveguide eigenmode computation for irregular structures, including bend losses and effects arising from singularities at corners, and a new iterative method for solution of the Helmholtz Equation. He is a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff at Sandia, a fellow of the Optical Society of America and a Senior Member of the IEEE.

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Fellow

Joseph W. Haus

Contact:
University of Dayton
Electro-Optics Program
Kettering Labs KL441
300 College Park
Dayton, OH 45469-0245
USA
Tel: 937-229-2394
jwhaus@udayton.edu
http://engineering.udayton.edu/eop

Discussion Topics:

  • Nanophotonics
  • Metallodielectrics and super-resolution
  • Nonlinear optics in heterogeneous media

Speaker Credentials:

Received B.S. (magna cum laude) and M.S. degrees in Physics from John Carroll University in 1971 and 1972.  A Ph.D. in Physics was conferred in 1975 from Catholic Unversity of America.  Held several positions including: NRC Post doctoral  fellow at the National Bureau of Standards; a researcher at the Kernforschungsanlage in Juelich, Germany, and NRC senior fellow at the U.S. Army Missile Command before taking a professor position at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1984.  In 1999 appoint as Director of the Electro-Optics Program at the University of Dayton. Published over 200 refereed papers and honored by fellowship in OSA, SPIE and APS.  
 

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David J. Hagan

Contact:
CREOL
The College of Optics and Photonics University of Central Florida
Orlando, FL 32816
USA
407-823-6817
hagan@creol.ucf.edu
http://www.creol.ucf.edu/People/Details.aspx?PeopleID=300

Discussion Topics:
  • Introduction to Nonlinear Optics (NLO): Why materials are optically “nonlinear”.
  • Physical models.
  • Causality.
  • Transitioning from new phenomena to engineered applications.
  • How to measure NLO effects: Z-scan, pump-probe, four wave mixing, etc.
  • Cascaded nonlinearities, scaling laws in NLO.
  • Materials and devices for NLO: Semiconductors, dielectrics, organics, nanoparticles.
  • Optical switching and limiting.
  • A guide to publishing your work in peer-reviewed journals.

Speaker Credentials:
David Hagan is a Professor of Optics and the Associate Dean at the College of Optics & Photonics, UCF. He is the editor-in-chief of “Optical Materials Express”. His current research interests include nonlinear optical characterization of materials, nonlinear optical processes in semiconductors and organics, nanostructural enhancement of optical nonlinearities and applications of nonlinear optics in optical power limiting and switching. He is also a Fellow of OSA.


 

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David Helie

Contact:
2400 rue Saint Louis de France
Quebec City, Quebec, Canada, G1P 2P1
418-931-9403
david.helie.1@ulaval.ca

Discussion Topics:

  1. Planning of youth educational outreach activities in Optics and Photonics
  2. Ultrafast laser processing of optical materials

Speaker Credentials:

David Hélie is a PhD student in physics at the Center for Optics, Photonics and Lasers at Université Laval in Quebec City, Canada. His research project focuses on ultrashort pulsed laser processing of optical materials and benefits from further support from Doric Lenses Inc., a company offering custom optical assembly services.

Since 2008, David has been particularly active in the planning of networking and outreach activities. He is currently treasurer for the Optics & Photonics student association, which represents the SPIE and OSA student chapters at Université Laval. In 2010, he was in charge of securing sponsorship for the Photonic Games outreach activity. He also participated in previous editions of the Photonic Games, supervising lab visits. In 2008, David was a co-organiser for the Photonics Toolkit conference held at Université Laval, a 3 day workshop for graduate students studying in optics that offered tools and practical knowledge not typically included in standard university courses.

David’s career objective is to be an active leader in the field of laser processing and micromachining. He also wishes to continue co-organising youth science outreach activities.

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Fellow

Bruce Horwitz

Contact:
76 Judith Rd.
Newton Centre, MA 02459
USA
Tel: 617-243-0007
Fax:  815-301-2867 
BruceAHz@techroadmap.com
www.techroadmap.com

Discussion Topics:

  • Intellectual Property - What It Is and How It Affects Your Activities  

Speaker Credentials:

During his research career, Dr. Horwitz had over twenty-five years of professional experience in new product development and has directed defense contract and commercial R&D in spatial light modulators, adaptive optics and diffractive optical encoding. Prior to founding TechRoadmap in 2000, he served as Vice President of R&D at MicroE Systems and Director of Optical Technology at AXSUN Technologies, two Boston area startups, and as a Principal Scientist and Program Manager at Litton-Itek Optical Systems. At TechRoadmap Dr. Horwitz functions as a company's Director or Intellectual Property on a part-time/outsource basis.

Dr. Horwitz has been an active member of the SPIE and the OSA and has served on the Executive Council of OSA's New England Section in a number of roles, including President. He has served as a reviewer for Applied Optics and co-chaired technical conferences. Dr. Horwitz has published over 20 articles in the areas of wavefront sensing, diffractive optical encoders and other physical optics phenomena.

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Fellow

Howard C. Howland

Contact:
Cornell University
W-201 Mudd Hall
Neurobiology and Behavior
Ithaca NY, 14850
USA
Tel: 607-255-4716
hch2@cornell.edu
http://www.nbb.cornell.edu/neurobio/department/faculty/howland/howland.html

Discussion Topics:

  • Physiological Optics of Animal Eyes
  • Aberrations of Human Eyes and their Compensation
  • Vision and Vestibular Stabilization of Eyes

Speaker Credentials:

Howard Howland was educated at the University of Chicago (BA), Tufts (MS Zoology), and Cornell (PhD, Biological Sciences).  Much of his graduate education was obtained at the Max Planck Institute for Behavioral Physiology in Seewiesen, Germany. He has been on the faculty of the Section and Department of Neurobiology and Behavior at Cornell University since 1968, where he has taught courses in vision and sensory physiology, and conducted research on vision and the vestibular system.  Much of his collaborative work has been done with his brother, Bradford Howland and his wife, Monica Howland as well as with his graduate students and post-doctoral associates.

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Steven L. Jacques

Contact:
Oregon Health & Science University
3303 SW Bond Ave.
Portland, OR 97239
USA
Tel: +1 503.418.9338
Fax: +1 503.418.9311
jacquess@ohsu.edu

Discussion Topics:

  • Tissue Optics
  • Laser-tissue Interactions
  • Optical Imaging

Speaker Credentials:

Steven L. Jacques, PhD, received a BS degree in Biology at M.I.T., and both an MS degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and a PhD degree in Biophysics and Medical Physics from the University of California-Berkeley (1984), where he used dielectric microwave measurements to explore the in vivo distribution of water in the stratum corneum of human skin.

His postdoctoral work was at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, rising to the position of Lecturer in Dermatology/Bioengineering, Harvard Medical School. He studied laser effects in skin, both experimental and theoretical. His team developed the use of Monte Carlo computer simulations to study optical transport in biological tissues, which is now widely used in the field of biophotonics.

In 1988, he joined the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer as an Assistant Professor of Urology/Biophysics and established a laboratory developing novel laser and optical methods for medicine, later achieving a tenured position as Associate Professor. He developed a hand-held spectrometer and the analysis software to noninvasively measure hyperbilirubinemia in newborns. This device was patented, licensed, and FDA approved to replace heel stick tests, and is now practice in neonatal care. As of 2009, over 20 million newborns have been tested with the device.

In 1996, he moved to Oregon, and joined the Oregon Health and Science University, where he now serves as Professor of Dermatology and Biomedical Engineering. His work continues on developing novel uses of optical technologies for both therapy and diagnosis. Currently, he has developed a hand-held polarized light camera to visualize skin cancer margins and guide surgical excision, now in clinical trials. He has developed in vivo sub-nm measurements of vibration of the cochlear membrane of the inner ear in animal models. He is developing novel microscopes that are sensitive to the ultrastructure of cells and tissues. Dr. Jacques has authored over 100 papers in peer-reviewed journals.

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Fellow

Chennupati Jagadish

Contact:
Australian National University
Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering
Canberra, ACT 0200
Australia
Tel: +61-2-6125-0363
Fax: +61-2-6125-0511
chennupati.jagadish@anu.edu.au
http://physics.anu.edu.au/people/profile.php?ID=106

Discussion Topics:

  • Quantum Dots for Optoelectronic Device Applications
  • Nanowires for Optoelectronic Device Applications
  • Intermixing and Selective Area Epitaxy of Quantum Dots for Optoelectronic Device Integration

Speaker Credentials:

Prof. Chennupati Jagadish was born and educated (BSc, MSc(Tech), MPhil, PhD) in India and worked in India and Canada prior to moving to Australia.  He moved to Australia in 1990 and established a major research program in the field of semiconductor optoelectronics and nanotechnology. He is currently a Federation Fellow (highest honor in Australian system), Professor and Head of Semiconductor Optoelectronics and Nanotechnology Group in the Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, the Australian National University (ANU).  His research interests include compound semiconductor optoelectronics and nanotechnology including quantum dots, nanowires, lasers, photodetectors, photonic integrated circuits, photonic crystals, THZ photonics.
Professor Jagadish is a winner of 2000 IEEE Millennium Medal, Peter Baume Award from the ANU and served as a Distinguished Lecturer of both IEEE Lasers and Electro-Optics Society and IEEE Electron Devices Society (EDS).  He has published more than 530 research papers (350 journal papers), holds 5 US patents, co-authored a book, co edited a book and edited eight conference proceedings, guest edited many journal special issues.  Professor Jagadish served as Vice-President (Publications) of the IEEE Nanotechnology Council (NTC) during 2004-2005, the Chair of the Nano-Optoelectronics and Nano-Photonics Technical Committee of NTC (2003-2006) and  Chair of the NTC Awards Committee.  He is also serving currently as Vice-President (Membership and Regional Activities- Asia-Pacific) of IEEE Lasers and Electro-Optics Society (2006-2008) and also a member of IEEE Fellow Selection Committee (2006-2008).  He served as an elected member of EDS AdCom (1999-2004), and as Chair of Optoelectronic Devices Technical Committee of EDS (1998-2003).  He also served as a member of the nanotechnology technical committee (TC), compound semiconductor devices and circuits TC of EDS. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, the American Physical Society, the Optical Society of America, the Australian Institute of Physics, the Institute of Physics (UK), the Institute of Nanotechnology (UK), the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering and the Australian Academy of Science, the SPIE-International Society for Optical Engineering, the Electrochemical Society, Inc., the Institution of Engineering and Techonology (UK), American Association for Advancement of Science  Prof. Jagadish served as an Associate Editor of the Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (2001-2005) and currently an Associate Editor of the IEEE/OSA Journal of Lightwave Technology (2003-2008) and Editor of IEEE Electron Device Letters. He is also Founding Editor of On-Line Journal of Nanotechnology and member of editorial boards of Applied Physics Reviews, J.Physics D: Applied Physics, Nanoscale Research Letters, Naotech Briefs, Ethics in Nanotechnology, Electrochemical and Solid State Letters and several other journals. He is the Convener of the Australian Research Council Nanotechnology Network and chaired many conferences (Chair of ICONN 2006, Program Chair of IEEE NANO2003, San Francisco) and served on many international professional society committees.  He advises high tech industries in Australia and overseas in the field of photonics and nanotechnology and collaborated with researchers from 20 different countries. 

_____________________________________________________
Fellow

Daniel F. V. James

Contact: 
University of Toronto
Dept. of Physics
60 St. George St., Toronto, M5S 1A7
Canada
Tel: +416-946-3736
dfvj@physics.utoronto.ca  
http://www.physics.utoronto.ca/~dfvj/

Discussion Topics:

  • Quantum Information, Computation and Teleportation
  • Quantum and Classical Coherence of Light
  • The physics of trapped ions

_____________________________________________________

Mona Jarrahi

Mona Jarrahi

Contact:
6731E Boelter Hall
420 Westwood Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095
USATel: 310-206-1371
mjarrahi@ucla.edu
http://www.seas.ucla.edu/~mjarrahi/mjarrahi.html

Discussion Topics:

  • Terahertz/Millimeter-Wave Electronics and Optoelectronics
  • Imaging and Spectroscopy Systems
  • Microwave Photonics

Speaker Credentials:

Mona Jarrahi received her Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University in 2007 and served as a Postdoctoral Scholar at University of California Berkeley from 2007 to 2008. After serving as an Assistant Professor at University of Michigan Ann Arbor, she joined University of California Los Angeles in 2013 as an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and the Director of the Terahertz Electronics Laboratory. Her research group focuses on Terahertz/Millimeter-Wave Electronics and Optoelectronics, Imaging and Spectroscopy Systems, and Microwave Photonics.

Prof. Jarrahi has made significant contributions to the development of ultrafast electronic/optoelectronic devices and integrated systems for terahertz/millimeter-wave sensing, imaging, computing, and communication systems by utilizing novel materials, nanostructures, and quantum well structures as well as innovative plasmonic and optical concepts. In recognition of her outstanding achievements, Prof. Jarrahi has received several prestigious awards in her career including the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE); Early Career Award in Nanotechnology from the IEEE Nanotechnology Council; Outstanding Young Engineer Award from the IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society; Booker Fellowship from the United States National Committee of the International Union of Radio Science (USNC/URSI); Grainger Foundation Frontiers of Engineering Award from National Academy of Engineering; Young Investigator Awards from the Army Research Office (ARO), the Office of Naval Research (ONR), and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA); Early Career Award from the National Science Foundation (NSF); the Elizabeth C. Crosby Research Award from the University of Michigan; and best-paper awards at the International Microwave Symposium and International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation.

Prof. Jarrahi is actively involved in several professional societies and has been on program committees of several conferences from IEEE, OSA, and SPIE societies. She is a senior member of IEEE, OSA, and SPIE societies and serves as a member of the Terahertz Technology and Applications Committee of IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques, an editorial board member of Journal of Infrared, Millimeter and Terahertz Waves, and a Visiting Lecturer of SPIE. In addition, she serves as a panelist and reviewer for National Science Foundation (NSF) and Department of Energy (DOE).

040.2235 Far infrared or terahertz
110.6795 Terahertz imaging Microwave Photonics, Ultrafast Optoelectronics, Nanophotonics

_____________________________________________________
Fellow

Charles Joenathan

Contact:
5500 Wabash Avenue
Terre Haute, IN 47802
USA
Tel: 812-877-8494
Fax: 812-877-8023
joenatha@rose-hulman.edu 
www.rose-hulman.edu/~joenatha   

Discussion Topics:

  • Speckle pattern interferometry and modern optical measurement tools
  • Range of electronic speckle pattern interferometer
  • 3-D shape measurement in holography and speckles

Speaker Credentials:

Research interests:

Optical data processing, Holography, Holographic Optical Elements (HOE), Speckle phenomena and techniques, Optical component testing, Fringe analysis, Programming in C, Fiber Optic Sensor and Technology.
Education: 1986 Ph.D. Physics and Optical Engineering, 1980 M.Sc. Physics 1978 B.S. Physics

Recent Academic Appointments:

July 99 - Present Professor and Chair, Department of Physics and Optical Engineering, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, Terre Haute, IN 47803, USA July 97 - July 98 Visiting Scholar, University of Stuttgart, Germany Sep. 91 - Present Professor, Department of Physics and Optical Engineering Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, Terre Haute, IN 47803, USA HONORS: Fellow - Optical Society of America, Member -SPIE, the international society for optical engineers, Fellow - Alexander Humboldt fellow association of America, Fellow - Optical Society of India, Young Scientist of India for the year 1987, Rose-Hulman’s Outstanding Scholar of the Year Award 1996-97.

Publication Sample :

  1. A quasi equal path ESPI, P.Song, C. Joenathan and B.M.Khorana, Optics Letters, 17, 1040 1042 [1992]
  2. Diameter measurement of single mode fibers using interferometric and imaging techniques, C. Joenathan and R.M.Bunch, Applied Optics, 32, 5989- 5996 [1993]
  3. Large in-plane displacement measurement in dual beam speckle interferometry using temporal Fourier-transformation, C. Joenathan, B. Franze, P. Haible, and H. J. Tiziani, J. Modern Optics, 45, 1975-1984 [1998].
  4. Novel temporal Fourier transform speckle pattern shearing interferometer, C. Joenathan, B. Franze, P. Haible, and H. J. Tiziani, Optical Engineering, 37, 1790-1795 [1998]
  5. Shape measurement using temporal Fourier-transform in dual beam illumination speckle interferometry,” C. Joenathan, B. Franze, P. Haible, and H. J. Tiziani, Applied Optics, 3385-3390 [1998]
  6. Temporal Speckle Pattern Interferometry, Optics in 1998, in Optics and Photonics News, 22-23, Dec. [1998]
  7. Speckle interferometry with temporal phase evaluation: Effect of speckle size, decorrelation and non linearity of the camera, C. Joenathan, P. Haible, and H. J. Tiziani, Applied Optics, 38, 1169-1178 [1999]
  8. Non destructive testing using temporal phase evaluation in speckle interferometry, C. Joenathan, B. Franze, P. Haible, and H. J. Tiziani, Experimental Mechanics, 40, 106-111 [2000]
  9. Influence of the speckle size on the modulation in Temporal Speckle Interferometry, C. Joenathan and H. Bailey, September issue, Optik [2003]
  10. Influence of surface roughness in dual beam illumination is speckle interferometers, C. Joenathan, R. Torroba, and R. Hanau, Optik, 4, 163-168 [2004].

_____________________________________________________
Fellow

Amita Kapoor

Contact:
M-79A, Observatory Compound
Lodi Road, New Delhi
00919811963164
kapoor_amita@yahoo.com
http:/amita-kapoor.blogspot.com

DiscussionTopic:

  • 060.2320 : Fiber Optics amplifiers and Oscillators
  • 060.2410 : Fibers Erbium
  • 130.3120 : Integrated Optics Devices Computer Networking: In general Artificial Intelligence and neural networks VHDL. Careers in Science

Speaker Credentials:

Teaching for last 15 years at undergraduate and graduate level. The subjects taught include Computer Communication, Microprocessor, VHDL, C++ language. Have been actively pursuing research since 2003, the areas of interest include theoretical modeling of various optical devices like EDFA, LPG, EDWA, SOA etc.

_____________________________________________________
Fellow

Henry Kapteyn

Contact:
JILA
University of Colorado at Boulder
Boulder, CO 80309-0440
USA
Tel: 303-492-8198
Fax: 303-492-5235
kapteyn@jila.colorado.edu
http://jilawww.colorado.edu/kmgroup

Discussion Topics:

  • The Promise of Attosecond Science
  • Ultrafast Lasers - Life in the Fast Lane
  • Extreme Light

Speaker Credentials:

Henry C. Kapteyn is Professor of Physics at the University of Colorado, and a fellow of JILA. He received his PhD from the University of California at Berkeley in 1989, following a BS from Harvey Mudd College (1982) and an MA from Princeton University (1984), and was previously faculty at Washington State University (1990-5) and the University of Michigan (1996-9). Henry is well known for his pioneering work in the development and the scientific application of intense laser pulses with duration of only a few optical cycles. Using new solid-state laser technologies they developed to generate and then amplify light pulses of ~10-20 fs duration, he and his collaborator Prof. Margaret Murnane pioneered the study of atomic dynamics on sub-optical cycle time-scales that is now known as attosecond science. The coherent EUV and x-ray light the can be generated in the intense-field high-harmonic generation process is now being used for studies in a variety of areas in science and technology. Their work has recently been recognized through the 2010 Schawlow Prize of the APS DLS, the 2010 R.W. Wood Prize of the OSA and the 2009 Zewail Award of the ACS.


_____________________________________________________
Fellow




Gerd Keiser

Contact:
65 Rachel Road
Newton Center, MA 02459-2923
USA
Tel: 617-916-1676
gkeiser@PhotonicsComm.com
www.bu.edu/ece/people/faculty


Discussion Topics:

060.0060 Fiber optics and optical communications
060.2310 Fiber optics
060.2330 Fiber optics communications
060.2360 Fiber optics links and subsystems
060.2400 Fiber properties
060.4510 Optical communications
170.0170 Medical optics and biotechnology
110.2350 Fiber optics imaging
170.3660 Light propagation in tissues

Speaker Credentials:

Gerd Keiser is a research professor at Boston University. Previously he was a visiting professor in Taiwan, a telecom researcher in industry, a visiting scientist at the University of Melbourne, Australia and at A*STAR, Singapore. He has authored over 85 technical papers and wrote 4 books (now writing a book on biophotonics). He has a PhD in physics from Northeastern University. His interests are optical fiber communications and biophotonics. He is an OSA fellow, IEEE fellow, and SPIE fellow.
 

_____________________________________________________
Fellow

Bernard Kippelen

Contact:
School of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Bunger Henry Building Room 207/208
777 Atlantic Drive NW
Atlanta, GA 30332-0250
USA
Tel: 404-385-5163
http://www.ece.gatech.edu

Discussion Topics:

  • Organic Solar Cells for Portable Power
  • The Dawn of Organic Optoelectronics
  • Organic Light-emitting Devices for Future Displays and Solid-state Lighting

Speaker Credentials:
Dr. Kippelen was born and raised in Alsace, France. He studied at the University Louis Pasteur in Strasbourg where he received a Maitrise in Solid-State Physics in 1985, and a Ph.D. in Nonlinear Optics in 1990.

From 1990 to 1997 he was Chargé de Recherches at the CNRS, France. In 1994, he joined the faculty of the Optical Sciences Center at the University of Arizona. There, he developed a research and teaching program on polymer optics and plastic electronics. He holds seven patents and has co-authored over 130 referenced publications and eleven book chapters. His publications have received over 1,400 citations. He served as chair and co-chair of numerous international conferences on organic optoelectronic materials and devices. He is the co-founder of several spin-off companies.

In August 2003, Dr. Kippelen joined the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology where his research ranges from the investigation of fundamental physical processes (nonlinear optical activity, charge transport, light harvesting and emission), to the design, fabrication and testing of light-weight flexible optoelectronic devices and circuits based on nanostructured organic materials. He currently serves as Associate Director of the Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics and Associate Director of MDITR an NSF funded Science and Technology Center.

_____________________________________________________
Fellow

Yuri Kivshar

Contact:
Australian National University
Nonlinear Physics Center
Canberra, ACT 0200
Australia
Fax: +61-26-125-8588
ysk@internode.on.net
http://wwwrsphysse.anu.edu.au/nonlinear/

Discussion Topics:

  • Nonlinear metamaterials
  • Optical solitons
  • Optical vortices
  • Metamaterials
  • Photonic crystals

190.0190   Nonlinear optics
060.0060   Fiber optics
130.0130   Integrated optics
160.0160   Materials (metamaterials, photonic crystals)

Speaker Credentials:

Yuri Kivshar received his PhD in 1984 from the USSR Academy of Science and was at the Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering (Kharkov, Ukraine).  From 1988 to 1993 he worked at different research centres in USA, France, Spain, and Germany. In 1993 he moved to the Australian National University where presently he is Australian Federation Fellow and Founding Head of the Nonlinear Physics Center.

Professor Yuri Kivshar was a recipient of the Medal and Award of the Ukrainian Academy of Science (1989), the International Pnevmatikos Prize in Nonlinear Physics (1995), the Pawsey (1998) and Lyle (2006) Medals of the Australian Academy of Science. In 1999 he was appointed as Associate Editor of the Physical Review, and in 2002 he was elected to the Australian Academy of Science. Yuri Kivshar published more than 600 research papers (h=62 is the highest h-index in physics in Australia), and his interests include nonlinear guided waves, optical solitons and vortices, nonlinear atom optics, photonic crystals, nanophotonics, and metamaterials.

_____________________________________________________

Christian Koos

Contact:
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
Institute of Photonic and Quantum Electronics
Engesserstr. 5
76131 Karlsruhe
Germany
Tel: +49-721-608-42481
christian.koos@kit.edu
http://www.ipq.kit.edu

Discussion Topics:

  • 060.4370 Nonlinear optics, fibers
  • 130.0250 Optoelectronics
  • 130.3120 Integrated optics devices
  • 130.5990 Semiconductors
  • 130.5460 Polymer waveguides
  • 190.4390 Nonlinear optics, integrated optics
  • 190.4360 Nonlinear optics, devices

Speaker Credentials:
Christian Koos is a professor at KIT, Photonics and Quantum Electronics (IPQ) since 2010. He received the M.Tech. (2002) and the Dr.-Ing. in Electrical Eng. (2007) from KIT. He carried out post-doctoral research at the IPQ, KIT, where he pioneered nanophotonic silicon-organic hybrid (SOH) devices in 2007-2008. From 2008 to 2010, he was leading the technology radars "Nanotools and Nanometrology" and "Metrology" within the Corporate Research and Technology department of Carl Zeiss AG, Germany.

_____________________________________________________
Fellow

Prem Kumar

Contact:
Northwestern University
EECS Department
2145 Sheridan Road
Evanston, IL 60201-3118
USA
Tel: 847-491-4128
Fax: 847-467-5319
kumarp@northwestern.edu
http://cpcc.northwestern.edu/

Discussion Topics:

  • Nonlinear and Quantum Optics in Fibers: From Noise-Free Signal Amplification to Quantum Communications
  • Quantum Information -- Technologies and Applications
  • "Beam Me Up Scotty," Fact or Fiction?

Speaker Credentials:

Prem Kumar is the AT&T Professor of Information Technology in the department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Director of the Center for Photonic Communication and Computing in the McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science at Northwestern University.  He also holds an appointment as Professor of Physics and Astronomy in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences at Northwestern University. He joined Northwestern in 1986 after spending five years at MIT as a research scientist.  He received a Ph.D. in physics from the State University of New York at Buffalo in 1980.  He is the author or co-author of over 400 publications, including one edited book, six patents, over 140 papers in peer-reviewed journals, 40 articles in hard-bound volumes, and over 80 invited conference papers.  His research focuses on the development of novel fiber-optic devices for ultrahigh-speed optical and quantum communication networks.  He is a fellow of the Optical Society of America (OSA), a fellow of the American Physical Society (APS), a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE), and a fellow of the Institute of Physics, UK (IoP).  He is also a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the Society of Photo Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).  In 2006 he received the Martin E. and Gertrude G. Walder Research Excellence Award from Northwestern University and in 2004 he was the recipient of the 5th International Quantum Communication Award established by the Tamagawa University in Tokyo, Japan.  On the academic side, his professional services have included Panel Reviewer, National Science Foundation; Associate Editor, Optics Letters; Member, OSA Publications Council; Editorial Board Member, Journal of the European Optical Society B -- Quantum and Semiclassical Optics; General (Program) Co-Chair, QELS 2008 (2006); Principal Organizer, 4th International Conference on Quantum Communication, Measurement, and Computing, Northwestern University, 1998; Vice Chairman, LEOS/IEEE Chicago Chapter, 1990/91.  On the business side, he is the founder of NuCrypt LLC, a startup company focusing on the commercialization of quantum encryption technology for securing the physical layer of fiber-based and free-space optical networks.  From 2002-2004 he was an Advisory Board Member for Baird Venture Partners in Chicago, IL and during the 2000-03 period, he served as a Scientific Advisor to Santel Networks in Newark, CA.

____________________________________________________
Fellow

Gershon Kurizki

Contact:
Weizmann Institute of Science
Department of Chemical Physics
Rehovot 76100
Israel
Tel:  972-8-934 2365 
Fax: 972-8-934 4123
cfkurizk@wisemail.weizmann.ac.il
http://www.weizmann.ac.il/chemphys/gershon/

Discussion Topics:

  • Decoherence and decay control and manipulation: quantum Zeno and Anti-Zeno effects
  • Quantum information and entanglement in cold-atom collisions
  • Ultracold-atom interactions with electromagnetic fields

020.0020 Atomic and molecular physics
020.1475 Bose-Einstein condensates
020.1670 Coherent optical effects
020.5580 Quantum electrodynamics
270.1670 Coherent optical effects
270.2500 Fluctuations, relaxations, and noise
270.5290 Photon statistics
270.5530 Pulse propagation and temporal solitons
270.5580 Quantum electrodynamics
270.5585 Quantum information and processing
270.0270 Quantum optics
270.6630 Superradiance, superfluorescence
 

Date and Place of Birth:

October 29 1952
Citizenship: Israeli

Speaker Credentials:

Prof. Kurizki received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. Degrees in physics from the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology (1979), while serving in the IDF. He then commenced Ph.D studies in Quantum Optics at the University of New Mexico (1980-1983). After two years as lecturer at Tel Aviv University he joined the staff of the Weizmann Institute of Science and holds the G.H. Dunne Professorial Chair in Quantum Optics. His research interests include quantum optics, laser physics, quantum measurement theory and quantum information. A Fellow of the OSA, the APS and the British Institute of Physics, he has coauthored over 220 scientific publications, including over 50 in Physical Review Letters and Nature.

Married and father of two sons, Prof. Kurizki writes philosophical essays and poetry in his spare time, often published in the literary periodical Keshet Hahadasha (The New Rainbow”)

Education

  • B.Sc. in Physics, Technion, Israel institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel, 1976-79, M.Sc. in Physics: Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel
  • Ph.D. in Physics: University of New  Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA
    Title of Ph.D. Thesis: Fast Charged Particles in Crystalline Solids: Propagation, Band Structure and Emission of Radiation.
    Supervisor: Professor M.O. Scully

Academic and Professional Experience

  • 1997-present, Professor, Theoretical Quantum Optics Chair, Chemical Physics Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel
  • 1991-1997, Associate Professor (Tenured), Chemical Physics Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel
  • 1987-1991, Senior Scientist, Chemical Physics Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel
  • 1985-1987, Scientist, Chemical Physics Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel
  • 1983-85, Lecturer, School of Chemistry, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel

Fellowships, Honors and Awards

  • 1988-1991, M. Russel-Haas Chair
  • 1994, Somekh-Saks Research Prize
  • 1999, Elected Fellow, Optical Society of America
  • 2002, Elected Fellow, American Physical Society
  • 2004, Elected Fellow, British Institute of Physics      
  • 2005- J.Phys. B Editorial Board
  • 2008 The W.E. Lamb Award in Laser Physics and Quantum Optics
  • 2009 The Humboldt Research Award 

Editorial Activities

Member of the Editorial Board of the periodicals:

  • Optics Communications (1997-2003)
  • J. Optics B (Quantum and Semiclassical Optics) (since 2002)
  • J. Phys. B. (since 2005)
  • Topical Editor for Optics Letters (since 2003)

_____________________________________________________
Fellow

Akhlesh Lakhtakia

Contact:
ESM Department
Penn State University
University Park, PA 16802
USA
Tel: 814-863-4319
akhlesh@psu.edu
http://www.esm.psu.edu/~axl4

Discussion Topics:

  • Nanoengineered Metamaterials
  • Brave New Nanoworld
  • Sculptured Thin Films

Speaker Credentials:

Akhlesh Lakhtakia is the Charles Godfrey Binder (Endowed) Professor of Engineering Science and Mechanics at the Pennsylvania State University. He obtained a Bachelor of Technology degree in Electronics Engineering from the Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India in 1979; a Master of Science and a Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Electrical Engineering from the University of Utah, Salt Lake City in 1981 and 1983, respectively; and a Doctor of Science degree in Electronics Engineering from the Banaras Hindu University in 2006. In 1983 he joined the faculty of the Pennsylvania State University.  He has published more than 600 journal articles; has contributed chapters to 14 research books and encyclopedias; has edited, co-edited, authored or co-authored 12 books and 7 conference proceedings; has reviewed for 101 journals; serves on the editorial boards of four electromagnetics journals; was the Editor-in-Chief of the international journal Speculations in Science and Technology from 1993 to 1995; and is the first Editor-in-Chief of the online Journal of Nanophotonics published by SPIE--International Society for Optical Engineering from 2007. He served as an international lecturer for the International Commission for Optics and the Optical Society of America; was twice a Visiting Professor of Physics at Universidad de Buenos Aires, a Visiting Professor of Physics at the University of Otago, and a Visiting Fellow in Mathematics at the University of Glasgow; headed the IEEE EMC Technical Committee on Nonsinusoidal Fields from 1992 to 1994; and is a Fellow of OSA, SPIE, and the Institute of Physics (UK). He also served as the 1995 Scottish Amicable Visiting Lecturer at the University of Glasgow. He was awarded the PSES Outstanding Research Award in 1996 and the PSES Outstanding Advising Award in 2005. For his research, he received the Faculty Scholar Medal in Engineering in 2005, and a Nano 50 Award for innovation in 2006. The University of Utah made him one of four Distinguished Alumni in 2007. His current research interests lie in the electromagnetics of complex materials, sculptured thin films (which won a Nano 50 Award in 2005), chiral nanotubes, negative refraction of light due to gravitational fields, and social implications of nanotechnology.

_____________________________________________________
Fellow

Vasudevan Lakshminarayanan

Contact:
University of Waterloo
Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1
Canada
Tel: 519-888-4567 ext 38167
Fax: 519-725-0784
vengu@uwaterloo.ca

Discussion Topics:

  • Human vision/psychophysics/visual performance
  • Optical fibers
  • Mathematical methods in optics

330.0330  Vision, color, and visual optics        
000.2060  Education
060.2310  Fiber optics
080.2720  Mathematical methods (general)
080.2730  Matrix methods in paraxial optics
120.5240  Photometry
170.4460  Ophthalmic optics and devices

Speaker Credentials:

Vasudevan (Vengu) Lakshminarayanan is currently a professor of optometry, physics and electrical engineering at Univ. Waterloo. He received his Ph.D. from UC Berkeley, and has held research and teaching appointments at UC Berkeley, UC Irvine, Univ. of Missouri, and has been a "KITP Scholar" at the Kavli Institute of Theoretical Physics. He is a fellow of the OSA, SPIE, AAAS, AAO as well as the Inst. of Physics (UK) and has won awards for teaching and research. He has also worked in the medical optics industry. He has widely published in areas ranging from bioengineering, classical optics, visual psychophysics (basic and clinical applications) and applied mathematics. He has served as a director of OSA, chair of the US advisory committee to the Int. commission on Optics, member of the editorial board of various journals and is a founding member and facilitator of the UNESCO ALOP (active learning in optics and photonics) project.

_____________________________________________________
Fellow & Board Member

Edmund Lam

Contact:
Electrical and Electronic Engineering Department
University of Hong Kong
Pokfulam, Hong Kong
Tel: (852)22415942
elam@eee.hku.hk  
http://www.eee.hku.hk/~elam
 
Discussion topics:

0100.3010 Image Reconstruction Techniques
110.1758 Computational Imaging

Speaker Credentials:

Edmund Lam received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University. He is now an Associate Professor in Electrical and Electronic Engineering and a Co-Director of the Computer Engineering program at the University of Hong Kong. He is also the founding director of its Imaging Systems Laboratory. During the 2010-11 academic year, he taught at the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Massachusetts Institute of Technology as a Visiting Associate Professor. He has broad research interests around the theme of computational optics and imaging, particularly its applications in semiconductor manufacturing and biomedical systems. To date, he has published around 170 articles, and graduated 7 Ph.D. and 9 Master students. A couple of his papers were given best paper awards, including the First ASML/Cymer Best Student Paper Award in the SPIE Lithography Asia conference, and he received the Outstanding Young Researcher Award of the University of Hong Kong in 2008. With regards to teaching, he has taught at all levels of the departmental courses, and has been involved in the organization and teaching of a general education course for several years. He was given an engineering Best Teacher Award in 2011. Besides his involvement within the university, he is also a topical editor of the Journal of the Optical Society of America A, an associate editor of the IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems, an editorial board member of the Journal of Ambient Intelligence and Smart Environments, and has been guest editors for the Multidimensional Systems and Signal Processing journal (Springer) and Journal of Electronic Imaging (SPIE). He is active in conference organizations, serving as a program committee member of many conferences over the years. These include OSA’s Signal Recovery and Synthesis meeting, of which he was the 2011 program chair. He is a senior member of IEEE, OSA, and SPIE.

_____________________________________________________
Fellow & Board Member

Byoungho Lee

Contact:
Seoul National University
School of Electrical Engineering
Gwanak-Gu Gwanakro 599, Seoul 151-744
Korea
Tel: +822-880-7245
Fax: +822-873-9953
byoungho@snu.ac.kr  
http://oeqelab.snu.ac.kr/professor
 
Discussion topics:

  • Plasmonics
  • Diffractive optics for nanostructures
  • Three-dimensional display

050.1970   Diffractive optics
090.0090   Holography
240.6680   Surface plasmons

Speaker Credentials:

Education

  • Ph.D. in EECS, University of California at Berkeley (Nov. 1993)
  • M.S. (1989) and B.S. (1987) in EE, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea

Experience

  • Sep. 1994 ~ Present: Faculty, School of Electrical Engineering, Seoul National University
  • Oct. 2003 ~ Present: Director of the Laser Measurement Technology Research Center, College of Engineering, Seoul National University

Honors received

  • Fellow, Optical Society of America (2005)
  • Fellow, SPIE-The International Society for Optical Engineering (2002)
  • The 5th Presidential Young Scientist Award of Korea (2002)

Society activities

  • 2006 ~ 2008: Director-at-Large (Board of Directors), Optical Society of America
  • Editorial board experience: Applied Optics, Optical Fiber Technology, Journal of the Society for Information Display, Japanese Journal of Applied Physics
  • 2007 ~ 2008: Co-chair, OSA Topical Meeting on Digital Holography and Three-Dimensional Imaging

Professional achievement

  • More than 200 international journal papers.
  • More than 330 international conference papers including 50 invited papers.

Please note: This speaker is an OSA Board Officer. Please contact OSA staff at chaptersandsections@osa.org before making your request directly to the lecturer.

_____________________________________________________

Gong Ru Lin

Gong-Ru Lin

Contact:
National Taiwan University
Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics
No. 1, Sect. 4, Roosevelt Rd
Taipei 10617, Taiwan
R. O. C.
Tel: +886-2-33663700 ext. 235
grlin@ntu.edu.tw 
http://gipo.ntu.edu.tw/eng/e_p6student-5-detail2
 
Discussion topics:

  • 140.7090 Ultrafast lasers, (Femtosecond fiber lasers)
  • 160.4236 Nanomaterials, (Graphen, Gaphite, Charcoal, SiC, Si)
  • 140.4050 Mode-locked lasers, (EDFL, SOA, FDPL)
  • 060.2330 Fiber optics communications, (WDM, TDM, OFDM)
  • 140.3520 Lasers, injection-locked, (VCSEL, DFBLD, FPLD)
  • 320.7130 Ultrafast processes in condensed matter

Speaker Credentials:

Gong-Ru Lin received the B. S. degree from the Department of Physics, Soochow University, Taiwan, in 1988 , the M. S. degree from the Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan, in 1990, and the Ph. D. degree from the Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan, in 1996. He has been engaged with several universities in Taiwan from 1997-2006, and has promoted as associated professor in 2001 and full professor in 2004. Since 2006, He directs the Laboratory of Fiber Laser Communications and Si Nano-Photonics with the Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics at National Taiwan University. He is the Senior Member of OSA, the Senior Member of IEEE, the Fellow of SPIE, the Fellow of IET, and the Fellow of IOP. He serves as the Member-at-large and MES council committee of the OSA, and is also Chair of IEEE Photonics Society Taipei Chapter from 2008-2011. He has a broadband research spectrum covering the fiber-optical communications, the femtosecond mode-locked fiber lasers, the all-optical data processing, the nanocrystallite Si photonics, and the millimeter-wave photonic phase-locked loops.

_____________________________________________________

Yannick Keith Lize

Contact:
400 Montpellier Blvd
Montreal, H4N 2G7
Canada
Tel: 514-849-2991
Fax: 514-744-2080
yannick.lize@gmail.com

Discussion Topics:

  • Careers in Research and Development: what to do during grad school to land that dream job
  • Next Generation Undersea, Terrestrial and Space Optical Telecommunication Systems: the technologies and the challenges.
  • Optical Fibers: from network transmission, telecom devices, to high power fiber lasers and amplifiers

Speaker  Credentials:

Yannick Keith Lize (SM’01–M’07) obtained the BSc in Applied Physics from Concordia University in Montreal in 2001 and the M.Sc. in physics from École Polytechnique in 2004 under the supervision of Prof. Suzanne Lacroix, Prof. Nicolas Godbout and Dr Christian Malouin. His PhD thesis on optical differential phase shift keying generation, transmission and demodulation was done at École Polytechnique de Montreal under Prof. Nicolas Godbout with a co-supervision from Prof. Alan E. Willner at the University of Southern California.

During his Ph.D. work, Yannick has done internships at the Centre for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) in Sydney, Australia under Prof. Benjamin J. Eggleton working on silica nanostructured nanowires, at the Centre for Ultra-Broadband Information Networks (CUBIN) in Melbourne, Australia under Prof. Rod Tucker and Thas Nirmalathas working on PMD emulation, at Alcatel/Lucent Bell Labs Crawford Hill, NJ, under Dr Randy Giles and Dr Xiang Liu on DPSK optical packet encoding, and at the University of Southern California under Prof. Alan E. Willner on DPSK demodulation and optical error correction.

Yannick is a recipient of the IEEE LEOS Graduate Student Fellowship in 2007, the Canadian Institute for Photonic Innovations (CIPI) student exchange grant in 2004, 2005 and 2006, the SPIE Scholarship in Optical Science and Engineering in 2005 and 2006, the OSA/Milton Chang student travel grant in 2005 and 2006, the 2003 and 2005 Student Presenter award of the Canadian Association of Physicists, the 2004 OSA/New Focus student travel grant and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada eMPOWR research bursary in 2004. He has 20 peer-reviewed publications to his credit (15 as first author), 40 papers at international conferences with review committee including 2 invited papers, as well as 5 patents.

Yannick is currently director of R&D for fused fiber-based advanced modulation format devices at ITF Laboratories in Montreal leading the development efforts on next generation DPSK, DQPSK and coherent demodulation devices. He is a member of the OSA, IEEE LEOS, IEEE ComSoc and SPIE. Yannick is a member of the OSA Membership and Education Services (MES) council, the OSA Esther Hoffman Beller Medal Committee and the technical program committee of the IEEE 7th International Conference on Optical Communications and Networks (ICOCN 2008).

_____________________________________________________

Carlos Lopez-Mariscal

Contact:
100 Bureau Drive
Stop 8424
Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8424
USA
Tel: 301-975-6867
Fax: 301-975-8272
clopez@nist.gov
http://www.nist.gov/index.html

Discussion Topics:

  • Optical trapping and manipulation
  • Optical beam shaping
  • Optical vortices, diffraction

Speaker Credentials:

Carlos Lopez-Mariscal received a BSc and PhD degrees from the Monterrey Institute of Technology in Mexico, where he worked on laser beam shaping at the Photonics and Mathematical Optics Group. He also worked on optical trapping and manipulation of particles using novel beams at the University of St Andrews in Scotland, where he developed a fiber trap for aerosol particles and carried out work on incoherent optical beams for optical trapping. He is now a postdoctoral researcher at the Atomic Physics division of the National Institute for Standards and Technology in Maryland, where he uses custom-tailored evanescent wave fields for parallel manipulation of submicroscopic biological structures.

_____________________________________________________


Kirill Larin

Contact:
Department of Biomedical Engineering
University of Houston
4800 Calhoun Rd
(SERC office): 3605 Cullen Blvd, Room 2023
(Eng office):  Eng Bldg 2, Room W206
Houston, TX 77204-5060
Tel: 832-842-8834
klarin@uh.edu
http://www.egr.uh.edu/bol

Discussion Topics:

  • 110.0113
  • 110.2960
  • 110.4500
  • 170.0170
  • 170.3890
  • 170.4470
  • 170.4500
  • 170.6935
  • 180.1790

Speaker Credentials:
Kirill V. Larin is an Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Houston. He also holds joint appointments at the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at Baylor College of Medicine and Department of Optics and Biophysics at the Saratov State University (Russia). Larin received his first M.S. in Laser Physics and Mathematics from the Saratov State University (1995), his second M.S. in Cellular Physiology and Molecular Biophysics (2001) and Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering (2002) from the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. Dr. Larin’s research contributions are in Biomedical Optics and Biophotonics and development and application of various optical methods for noninvasive and nondestructive imaging and diagnostics of tissues and cells (more information could be found on his lab webpage http://www0.egr.uh.edu/bol/). He has authored more than 70 peer-reviewed publications and chapters in six books on Biomedical Optics. Dr. Larin has received numerous awards including Presidential Award from Russian President Boris Yeltsin, Wallace Coulter Young Investigator Translation Award, Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award, Outstanding Young Investigator Award from the Houston Society for Engineers in Medicine and Biology, Herbert Allen Award from American Society for Mechanical Engineers, and UH Research Excellence Award. Dr. Larin has delivered more than 50 invited and plenary talks, serves as a chair of Dynamics and Fluctuations in Biomedical Photonics and Optical Elastography conferences and a member of number technical committees at professional conferences. He is senior member of SPIE. Dr. Larin is also an Instructor for short courses on Tissue Optics and Biophotonics for the SPIE, IEEE, and OSA. Currently, his research activities are supported by grants from NIH (1R01EY022362, 1R01HL095586, 1R01HL120140, U54HG006348) and DOD/NAVSEA (PRJ71TN).

_____________________________________________________
Fellow

Virendra N. Mahajan

Contact:
The Aerospace Corporation
M. S. M5/672
2350 East El Segundo Blvd
El Segundo, CA 90245-4691
USA
Tel: 310-336-1783
virendra.n.mahajan@aero.org

Discussion Topics:

  • Exploring Optical Aberrations
  • Zernike Polynomials and Wavefront Fitting
  • Orthonormal Polynomials for Systems With Noncircular Pupils
  • Gaussian Apodization and Beams
  • Imaging Through Atmospheric Turbulence
  • Image Quality Criteria

Speaker Credentials:

Education

Ph. D., Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ
M. S., Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR

Experience

  • 1983-Present, Current Position: Distinguished Scientist, The Aerospace Corporation, El Segundo, CA
  • 2004-Present, Adjunct Professor, College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ
  • Fall 2005, Distinguished Visiting Professor, College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida
  • 1984-1998, Adjunct Professor, Electrical Engineering-Electrophysics Dept. University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA
  • 1974-1983, Last Position: Section Chief and Associate Division Leader, The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Cambridge, MA

Professional Activities and Affiliations

  • Winner of SPIE’s 2006 A. E. Conrady award.
  • Fellow of the Optical Society of America, SPIE, and the Optical Society of India.
  • Topical Editor of Optics Letters in the area of Optical Imaging and Diffraction (2002–2005)
  • Associate Editor, Optical Society of America Handbook of Optics (2005-Present)
  • Member of SPIE Education Committee (1991–1994), Publications Committee (1999–2001), and Fellows Committee (2002–2005).
  • Member of the OSA’s Holonyak Jr. Award Committee (2004–2005)
  • Chairman (1984–1986) and Vice Chairman (1983–1984) of the Astronomical, Aeronautical and Space Optics technical group of the Optical Society of America.
  • Distinguished Visiting Professor at National Central University, Chung Li, Taiwan in 2006.
  • Invited seminars at the International Photonics Center, Cochin University of Science and Technology (2003, 2005); Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, Leon, Mexico (2005); INAOE (National Institute of Astronomy, Optics, and Electronics), Tonantzintla, Mexico (2005, 2006).
  • Visiting Professor in the Physics Department, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi, India, Spring 1991.
  • Short course instructor on optical imaging, aberrations, fabrication tolerances, and image quality at the OSA and SPIE meetings.
  • Organizer and short course instructor in optics to Air Force and Aerospace employees in 1985, 1987, and 1991.
  • Organizer and chair of a symposium on “Remote sensing optical systems for astronomy, space and aircraft applications” at the 1985 annual meeting of the Optical Society of America.
  • Organizer and chair of a symposium on “Phased array imaging from ground and space” at the 1986 annual meeting of the Optical Society of America.
  • Visiting lecturer on “Optical Imaging” at the Indian Institute of Science (Bangalore) in December 1981.
  • Reviewer for JOSA, Applied Optics, Optics Letters, Optical Engineering, Optics Communications, Journal of Pure and Applied Optics, and Journal of Optics

_____________________________________________________
Fellow 

Joseph Mait

Contact:
US Army Research Laboratory
AMSRD-ARL-SE-R
2800 Powder Mill Rd
Adelphi, MD 20783-1197
USA
Tel: 301-394-2462
Fax: 301-394-4546
jmait@arl.army.mil

Discussion Topics:

  • From Ink Bottles to E-beams: A history of diffractive optics
    The history of diffractive optic technology is traced from the first hand-drawn computer-generated holograms to elements fabricated using electron beams that are smaller than a human hair.  In particular we highlight the influence of technology on design techniques showing how the availability of computer plotters in the 1960s lead to early encoding techniques.  The transition in the 1970s to photolithographic fabrication changed the nature of diffractive design from cell-oriented to point-oriented encoding.  At the same time optimization routines were developed that incorporated these new fabrication constraints.  The introduction of electron beam writing in the fabrication of diffractive optics in the 1980s brought diffractive design in the 1990s full circle to techniques that are again cell-oriented.
  • Computational Imaging
    Conventional techniques in imaging and imager design can be traced to the invention of glass in antiquity and the discovery of a lens' imaging properties six centuries ago. The physics underlying imaging was established four centuries ago and refined over 250 years. However, imaging systems are on the verge revolutionary change.Computational imaging attempts to break conventional paradigms in imager design by combining optics with electronics in image and sensor processing. Technological advances in unconventional optical elements and materials, new detectors, and dramatic speed improvements in post-detection electronic processing hardware have created an atmosphere ripe for developing integrated imaging concepts that would have been considered impractical just a few short years ago.

Speaker Credentials:

Dr. Mait received his BSEE from the University of Virginia in 1979 and received his graduate degrees from the Georgia Institute of Technology; his MSEE in 1980 and Ph.D. in 1985. Since 1989 Dr. Mait has been with the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (formerly Harry Diamond Laboratories) and served in several different positions including group leader for basic research in optics and Sensors Directorate Associate for Science and Technology. He is presently a senior technical (ST) researcher. Dr. Mait's academic experience includes time as an assistant professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Virginia and as an adjunct associate professor at the University of Maryland, College Park. He has also held visiting positions at the Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Optik, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany and the Center for Technology and National Security Policy at the National Defense University in Washington DC. Dr. Mait's research interests include sensors and the application of optics, photonics, and electro-magnetics to sensing and sensor signal processing. Particular research areas include diffractive optic design, integrated computational imaging systems, and signal processing. He is a Fellow of the professional societies SPIE and OSA, and a senior member of IEEE. He is also a member of the national honorary societies Sigma Xi, Tau Beta Pi, and Eta Kappa Nu, and is a Raven from the University of Virginia.

_____________________________________________________
Fellow

Walter Makous

Contact:
Tel: 585-719-0902
walt@cvs.rochester.edu
www.bcs.rochester.edu/people/walt/makous.html

Discussion Topics:

  • Vision
  • Physiological optics
  • Standards for computer workstations

Speaker Credentials:

  • Professor of Visual Science, of Brain and Cognitive Science, and of Ophthalmology, University of Rochester
  • Former Director of the Center for Visual Science, University of Rochester
  • Fellow of the Optical Society of America and the American Association for the Advancement of Science
  • 70 publications in peer-reviewed journals
  • Former editor for vision and color for the Journal of the Optical Society A
  • Editor for display standards in the Human Factors Engineering of Computer Workstations, published by the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

_____________________________________________________
Fellow

Masud Mansuripur

Contact:
The University of Arizona
College of Optical Sciences
Tucson, Arizona 85721
USA
Tel: 520-621-4879             
Fax: 520-621-4358
masud@optics.arizona.edu
www.optics.arizona.edu/masud/

Discussion Topics:

  • Radiation pressure and the momentum of light in transparent dielectric and magnetic media
  • Principles of optical disk data storage
  • Transmission of light through sub-wavelength slits and apertures: The role of surface plasmon polaritons

Speaker Credentials:

Professor Mansuripur has been at the College of Optical Sciences of the University of Arizona since 1988. His main areas of research include: optical and macro-molecular data storage, theory of diffraction, interaction of light with sub-wavelength structures, optics of thin films and multilayer stacks, and problems associated with radiation pressure and photon momentum in dielectric and magnetic materials. He is the author of "Introduction to Information Theory," (Prentice-Hall, 1987), "The Physical Principles of Magneto-optical Recording," (Cambridge University Press, 1995), and "Classical Optics and Its Applications,"  (Cambridge University Press, 2002). Professor Mansuripur teaches "Fourier Optics" and "Classical Electromagnetic Theory" at the College of Optical Sciences.

_____________________________________________________

Seth R. Marder

Contact:
Georgia Institute of Technology
901 Atlantic Drive, NW
Atlanta, GA  30332-0400
USA
Tel: 404-385-6048
Fax: 404-894-5909
seth.marder@chemistry.gatech.edu
http://www.chemistry.gatech.edu/faculty/Marder/

Speaker Credentials:

Seth Marder is currently a Professor of Chemistry and Materials Science and Engineering, (courtesy) at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He is also a co-founder of Arizona Microsystems, L.L.C., Focal Point L.L.C and LumoFlex, L.L.C. and is a member of the scientific advisory board of Lumera Corporation.

Dr. Marder obtained a Bachelors of Science in Chemistry from MIT in 1978 and his Doctorate from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1985, where he was a W. R. Grace Fellow.  Dr. Marder then was a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford from 1985–1987. After his stay at Oxford, he moved to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) California Institute of Technology (Caltech) where he was a National Research Council Resident Research Associate from 1987–1989.

He later became a Member of the Technical Staff at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a Member of the Beckman Institute at Caltech and Associate Director, for the Office of Naval Research Center for Advanced Multi-Functional Nonlinear Optical Polymers and Molecular Assemblies, until he moved to the University of Arizona in 1998. He has been appointed the founding director of the Consortium for Advanced Nanoscopic Science and Technology at the University of Arizona and is the Deputy Director and co-principal investigator on the National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center: Materials and Device for Information Technology Research.  In 2003 he moved to the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the Georgia Institute of Technology where he was appointed the founding director for the Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics and holds a courtesy appointment in the School of Material Sciences and Engineering.  In addition Dr. Marder is a guest professor at Shanghai Jiaotung University, Huazhang University of Science and Technology, Anhui University and Wuhan University.

His research interests are in the development of materials for nonlinear optics, applications of organic dyes for photonic, display, electronic and medical applications, and organometallic chemistry.  Recently, his research group has been systematically designing dyes for large two-photon absorption cross sections for a variety of applications ranging from two-photon induced polymerization to dyes for two-photon fluorescence microscopy.

Dr. Marder was the 1993 recipient of JPL's Lew Allen Award for outstanding research by a scientist in the early part of his career, a recipient of an NSF Special Creativity Award, and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2003) and the Optical Society of America (2004), SPIE (2006), and the Royal Society of Chemistry (2007).  He has co-authored over 200 research papers, has organized or served on organizing committees for over thirty-five scientific conferences, including chairing the Seventh International Conference on Organic Nonlinear Optics. In addition Dr. Marder has co-edited several proceedings including an ACS symposium series monograph entitled "Materials for Nonlinear Optics: Chemical Perspectives", as well as proceedings for SPIE and MRS.  He has served on the Board of Reviewing Editors for Science Magazine and as a member of the Editorial Board for Chemistry of Materials, Nonlinear Optics and Quantum Optics,  the Journal of Materials Chemistry and the International Advisory Board for Chemical Communications.  He has also been a guest editor for several journals including an issue of Advanced Functional Materials.

_____________________________________________________
Fellow

Arthur R. McGurn

Contact:
Western Michigan University
Department of Physics
1903 W. Michigan Ave.
Kalamazoo, Michigan 49008-5252
USA
Tel: 269-387-4950
Fax: 269-387-4939
arthur.mcgurn@wmich.edu 
http://tesla.physics.wmich.edu/Bio.php?PG=12

Discussion Topics:

  • Photonic Crystal Waveguides and Circuits: Linear and Nonlinear Modes
    A discussion is given of the theory of modes in photonic crystal waveguides and networks of photonic crystal waveguides. Topics including in-channel barriers, off-channel features and their interactions with guided modes, and waveguide junctions formed of both linear and nonlinear dielectric media are treated. The properties of intrinsic localized modes and dark soliton-like modes in Kerr nonlinear photonic crystal waveguides are explained.
  • Enhanced Backscattering from Rough Surfaces and Thin Films
    The theory of phase coherent enhanced backscattering from rough surfaces and thin films is discussed. Both analytical and computer simulations methods are treated and the relationship of the phenomena to weak localization is explained. Weak localization effects in the diffuse transmission of light through thin films as well as in the diffuse reflection of light from thin films is considered. The theory is related to experimental studies on these types of systems.
  • Speckle Correlations in the Scattering of Light from Rough Surfaces and Thin Films
    The theory of the speckle in the scattering of light from rough surfaces and the diffuse transmission of light through thin films is discussed. Phase coherent effects found in the speckle patterns that arise from the weak localization of surface polaritons and from other kinematic effects of surface polariton interactions are emphasized.

190.0190   Nonlinear optics
290.0290   Scattering
030.5770   Roughness  
030.6140   Speckle
050.5298   Photonic crystals
160.3918   Metamaterials
160.4236   Nanomaterials
160.5293   Photonic bandgap materials
160.5298   Photonic crystals

Speaker Credentials:

Arthur McGurn received the Ph. D. in Physics from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 1975, and has done postdoctoral work at Temple University, Michigan State University, and George Washington University (NASA-Langley Research Center). He has taught at Western Michigan University since 1981. He is Fellow of the Optical Society of America, Fellow of the Institute of Physics, Fellow of the American Physical Society, Fellow of the Electromagnetics Academy, and Distinguished Faculty Scholar at Western Michigan University. His areas of optics research include: phase coherent effects in scattering (surfaces, films, bulk) with emphasis on enhanced backscattering and speckle correlations, photonic crystals, photonic crystal waveguides and circuits, and the nonlinear optical properties of photonic crystal waveguides and circuits. His research in condensed matter physics has included: magnetic excitations, phonons, amorphous materials, Anderson Localization, molecular dynamics, and quantum Monte Carlo methods. His website is http://tesla.physics.wmich.edu/Bio.php?PG=12

_____________________________________________________
Fellow

Colin J. McKinstrie

Contact:
Bell Laboratories
Alcatel-Lucent
Holmdel, NJ 07733
USA
Tel: 732-888-7275
Fax: 732-888-7074
mckinstrie@alcatel-lucent.com

Discussion Topics:

  • Recent advances in fiber-based parametric devices.
  • Parametric devices based on four-wave mixing in fibers provide many functions that are required by optical communication systems. When operated in the linear regime, parametric devices provide amplification, frequency conversion and phase conjugation, all with high gain levels and broad bandwidths. They can also be used to buffer, monitor and switch optical signals. When operated in the nonlinear regime, parametric devices regenerate signals. They also produce entangled and squeezed states of light. In this talk recent research on parametric devices will be reviewed, and the implications of this research for classical and quantal communication systems will be discussed.
  • Nonlinear optics in fibers (solitons and four-wave mixing)
  • Quantum optics in fibers (parametric processes)

Speaker Credentials:

Colin J. McKinstrie received BSc and PhD degrees from the Universities of Glasgow and Rochester, in 1981 and 1986, respectively. From 1985 to 1988 he was a Postdoctoral Fellow of Los Alamos National Laboratory, where he was associated with the Applied Phyics Division and the Center for Nonlinear Studies. In 1988 he returned to the University of Rochester as a Professor of Mechanical Engineering and a Scientist in the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, where his main research interests were laser fusion and nonlinear optics. Since 2001 Dr. McKinstrie has been a Member of the Technical Staff at Bell Laboratories, where his research concerns the amplification and transmission of optical pulses in communication systems. He has served on leadership committees for OSA, technical committees for CLEO, FiO and OFC, and is a Deputy Editor of Optics Express."

_____________________________________________________
Fellow

Igor Meglinski

Contact:
Department of Physics
University of Otago
P.O. Box 56 Dunedin 9054
New Zealand
Tel: +6434797754
igor@physics.otago.ac.nz

Speaker Credentials:

Professor Igor Meglinski, PhD, FInstP has a considerable (about 20 years) experience in developing novel optical diagnostic techniques for various bio-medical and industrial applications. He obtained PhD in biophysics and biomedical optics jointly from the University of Pennsylvania, U.S. and Saratov State University, Russia (1997). He is currently head of Biophotonics and Biomedical Imaging at the Department of Physics, University of Otago and Node Leader at the Biophotonics4Life (BP4L) Worldwide Consortium. His research interests lie at the interface between physics, medicine and biological sciences, focusing on the development of new non-invasive imaging/diagnostic techniques and their applications in medicine and biology, material sciences, pharmacy, food and health care industries. He is author and co-author over 180 papers in peer-reviewed scientific journals, conference proceedings and book chapters; over 250 presentations at a range of international conferences and workshops, including over 120 invited lectures and plenary talks.

Discussion Topics:
 
Non-invasive optical diagnostics of blood and lymph flow and micro-circulation
Application of coherent circularly polarized light for cancer diagnostics and tissues biopsy
Unified Monte Carlo modeling of photon migration in biological tissue
Optical biosensor for biomedical diagnostics
 

  • 030.1670 Coherent optical effects;
  • 030.5620 Radiative transfer;
  • 030.6140 Speckle;
  • 110.0113 Imaging through turbid media;
  • 110.7050 Turbid media;
  • 120.5410 Polarimetry;
  • 120.5820 Scattering measurements;
  • 170.1470 Blood or tissue constituent monitoring;
  • 170.3660 Light propagation in tissues;
  • 170.4580 Optical diagnostics for medicine;
  • 170.5280 Photon migration;
  • 260.2130 Ellipsometry and polarimetry;
  • 260.5430 Polarization;
  • 280.1350 Backscattering;
  • 290.1350 Backscattering;
  • 290.4210 Multiple scattering;
  • 290.5855 Scattering, polarization;
  • 290.5890 Scattering, stimulated;
  • 290.7050 Turbid media;
  • 330.7326 Visual optics, modeling;

_____________________________________________________
Fellow

Pierre Meystre

Contact:
The University of Arizona
Department of Physics and College of Optical Sciences
USA
Tel: 520-621-4651
pierre.meystre@optics.arizona.edu
www.optics.arizona.edu/meystre

Discussion Topics:

  • Ultracold atoms and molecules, nonlinear atom optics
  • Topics in cavity QED
  • Cavity optomechanics

Speaker Credentials:

Pierre Meystre obtained his Physics Diploma and PhD from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne in 1971 and 1974, respectively, and the Habilitation in Theoretical Physics from the University of Munich in 1983. He joined the Max-Planck Institute for Quantum Optics in 1977, following a postdoctoral position with M. O. Scully at The University of Arizona. In 1986, he returned to The University of Arizona where he is currently a Regents Professor of Optical Sciences and Physics, holds the Chair of Quantum Optics and is Director of the newly founded B2 Institute. Dr. Meystre’s research includes theoretical quantum optics, atomic physics, ultracold atoms, atom optics, Bose condensation and quantum-degenerate atomic and molecular systems. He has published over 290 refereed papers and is the author of the text “Elements of Quantum Optics”, together with Murray Sargent III, and of the monograph “Atom Optics.” Awards and honors include Fellow, Optical Society of America; Fellow, American Physical Society; Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is a recipient of the Humboldt Foundation Research Prize for Senior US Scientists and of the R.W. Wood Prize of the Optical Society of America.  Dr. Meystre served as Chair-of the Division of Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics of the American Physical Society, and is currently a member of the National Research Council Board on Physics and Astronomy.

_____________________________________________________
Fellow

Margaret Murnane

Contact:
JILA
University of Colorado at Boulder
Boulder, CO 80309-0440
USA
Tel: 303-210-0396
Fax: 303-492-5235
murnane@jila.colorado.edu
http://jilawww.colorado.edu/kmgroup

Discussion Topics:

  • The Promise of Attosecond Science
  • Ultrafast Lasers - Life in the Fast Lane
  • Extreme Light

Speaker Credentials:

Margaret Murnane is a Fellow at JILA and a member of the Department of Physics and Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Colorado. She received her B.S and M.S. degrees from University College Cork, Ireland, and her Ph.D. degree in physics from the University of California at Berkeley in 1989, and joined the faculty of physics at Washington State University in 1990. In 1996, Professor Murnane moved to the University of Michigan, and in 1999 she moved to the University of Colorado. She runs a joint research group and a small laser company with her husband, Prof. Henry Kapteyn. Prof. Murnane's research interests have been in ultrafast optical and x-ray science. Prof. Murnane is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the Optical Society of America. In 1997 she was awarded the Maria Goeppert-Mayer Award of the American Physical Society, in 2000 she was named a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellow, in 2004 she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences, and in 2006 she was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

_____________________________________________________

Mikhail A. Noginov

Contact:
Alabama A&M University
Department of Physics
P.O. Box 1268
Normal, AL 35762
USA
Tel: 205-851-5305
Fax: 205-851-5622
mnoginov@nsu.edu

Discussion Topics:

  • Conquering Surface Plasmon Loss by Optical Gain
    We have observed the compensation of loss in metal by gain in dielectric in the mixture of Ag aggregate and rhodamine 6G dye. The demonstrated six-fold enhancement of the Rayleigh scattering is the evidence of the enhancement of the localized surface plasmon (SP) resonance.
    In the attenuated total internal reflection setup, we have demonstrated ~30% elongation of the SP propagation length and shown that the full compensation of loss of propagating SP by optical gain is within the reach.
    These experimental observations pave the road to many applications of nanoplasmonics and metamaterials.
  • Powder Laser: Demonstration and Principles of Operation
    A short-spike (¾1 ns) laser-like emission can be obtained in powders and ceramics of highly scattering solid-state luminophosphors in response to 10-100 ns Q-switched pumping pulse. This emission is characterized by a dramatic narrowing of the emission spectral line above some well defined pumping energy threshold. The main features of the experimentally observed stimulated emission are described with a simple model accounting for the excited state concentration of excited centers and emission energy density in the pumped volume. Multi-line operation in mixtures of powders, tuning of the emission wavelength, second harmonic generation, and many other interesting features will be discussed in the talk. The results obtained imply that low cost scattering media provide a new dimension to the creation of laser sources which can have many unanticipated applications.

Speaker Credentials:

  • Mikhail A. Noginov graduated from Moscow Institute for Physics and Technology (Moscow, Russia) with a Master of Science degree in Electronics Engineering in 1985.
  • In 1990 he received a Ph.D. degree in Physical-Mathematical Sciences from General Pysics Institute of the USSR Academy of Sciences (Moscow, Russia).

The appointments of Dr. Noginov include: General Physics Institute of the USSR Academy of Sciences (Moscow, Russia) Junior Staff Research Scientist, then Staff Research Scientist (1985-1991); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA; Center for Materials Science and Engineering; Post Doctoral Research Associate (1991-1993); Alabama A&M University, Huntsville, AL, Assistant Research Professor, then Associate Research Professor (1993-1997); and Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA, Department of Physics, Center for Materials Research. Research Associate Professor, then Assistant Professor, currently Associate Professor (1997-present).

Dr. Noginov has published one book, three book chapters, two edited SPIE proceedings volume, 90 papers in peer reviewed journals, over 100 publications in proceedings of professional societies and conference technical digests (10 of them invited).

Dr. Noginov is a member of Sigma Xi, OSA, SPIE, and APS. He has served as a chair and a committee member on several conferences of SPIE and OSA.

The biography of Dr. Noginov is published in in Who’sWho in America since 2003 and Who’sWho in the World since 2004. He regularly serves on NSF panels and reviews papers for many professional journals. Since 2003, Dr. Noginov has been a faculty advisor for the OSA student chapter at NSU.
Research interests of Dr. Noginov include Random Lasers, Nanoplasmonics, Solid-State Laser Materials, and Nonlinear Optics.

_____________________________________________________
Fellow

Donald C. O'Shea

Contact:
1146 Lullwater Rd., NE
Atlanta, GA 30307
USA
Tel: 404-373-0035
doshea@prism.gatech.edu

Discussion Topic:

  • Publishing Optics
    After discussing the first scientific paper, which was written by Isaac Newton, I will describe the procedures that we currently use to publish papers in this digital electronics era and provide some guidance for student on publishing papers in today's rapidly changing methods of communication. As we move from print publications to their electronic versions we gain flexibility, but we also create problems. Concepts such as real-time publishing and virtual journals are being to be introduced and problems as old as plagiarism and new as open access journals must be addressed.

Speaker Credentials:

Donald C. O'Shea is Emeritus Professor of Physics. He is currently the editor of Optical Engineering. Dr. O'Shea is a Fellow of OSA and SPIE. He created the Optics Discovery Kit for the Optical Society of America for use in precollege education. He was awarded the Esther Hoffman Beller Award by the OSA for “excellence in the field of optics education”.

The publication of the results of our research is the final step in our scientific effort. The distribution of a researcher's findings though a scientific journal began on February 16, 1672 in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Until recently the way we publish our work has changed little. As Editor of Optical Engineering, I will describe the procedures that we currently use to publish papers in this digital electronics era and provide some guidance on publishing papers in today's rapidly changing methods of communication. As we move from print publications to their electronic versions we gain flexibility, but we also create problems. Concepts such as real-time publishing and virtual journals are being to be introduced and problems as old as plagiarism and new as open access journals must be addressed.

_____________________________________________________ 

Bishnu P. Pal

Contact:
Indian Institute of Technology Delhi
Hauz Khas
New Delhi: 110 016
India
Tel:  91-11-2659 1327
Fax: 91-11-2686 5039
bppal@physics.iitd.ernet.in
http://web.iitd.ac.in/~bppal/   

Discussion Topics:

  • Microstructured Optical Fibers and Waveguides: An Emerging Technology and its Potentials
    Microstructured optical fibers have been a latest addition to the variety of exotic optical fibers, which are often referred to as Photonic Crystal fibers and Photonic Band Gap fibers. The talk would focus on basic functional principle of optical wave guidance in such fibers vis-a-vis conventional fibers. Details of propagation and design & technology of 1D photonic band gap Bragg fibers would be described, in which we have recently made some research contributions and our collaborators in Russian Academy of Science have succeeded in fabricating some of our designed fibers. Discussions on applications would include designs of dispersion compensating fibers, fibers for metro networks, generation of supercontinuum light, and if time permits on Bragg reflection waveguides.
  • All-Fiber Guided Wave Optical Component Technology Platforms for Optical Networks
    Today’s high-speed dense wavelength division multiplexed optical communication networks require a host of branching components for functions like signal splitting/combining, add/drop of signal-carrying wavelengths, wavelength multiplexing, signal taps, wavelength interleaving, wavelength filters, etc.  If these components could be realized in an all-fiber form, one has the advantage of integrating these in a network simply through fiber splicing.  The talk would be an attempt to describe three technology platforms namely, fused fiber couplers, side-polished fiber half couplers, and in-fiber gratings, which could yield a wide variety of such components in an all-fiber form and our own experience on in-house developments of these technologies.
  • Optical Fiber Sensors and Components
    Optical fiber sensors have attracted a great deal of attention in the last two decades as an alternate major application area of optical fibers besides their well known applications in telecommunication as optical signal transmission media. It was realized in mid-1970s itself that these fibers often show exceptional sensitivity to a host of environmental physical parameters, which could be exploited to configure these fibers as sensors to measure those parameters as measurands.  One of the most attractive features of optical fiber sensors is their inherent ability to provide distributed measurements.  Optical fibers have been indeed used as sensors to measure a variety of physical quantities like refractive index, pH, moisture ingress in concrete, strains in civil structures, large electric current in power utilities like current flow in a busbar, biological samples like infected cells, etc.

Speaker Credentials:

Bishnu P. Pal was born in Shillong, India on 3rd December 1948.  He received M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in Physics from Jadavpur University (Kolkata) and IIT Delhi in 1970 and 1975, respectively as a National Science Talent Search Scholar of NCERT (India). In late 1977 he joined the academic staff of IIT Delhi, where he is a Professor of Physics since 1990.  He has worked as Visiting Scholar/Visiting Professor in the area of Fiber Optics and Applications for various periods at the Norwegian Institute of Technology (Trondheim, Norway), the Fraunhofer Institute für Physikalische Messtechnik (Freiburg, Germany) as Alexander von Humboldt Fellow, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (Boulder, CO, USA) as a Fulbright Scholar, University of Strathclyde (Glasgow, UK), City University Hong Kong, and Universities at Nice and Limoges (France) as Visiting Professor/Scholar. He had been a member of the founding Editorial Advisory Board of the International Journal of Optoelectronics (1988-93) published by Taylor and Francis from UK and is currently a Member of the Editorial Board of Optoelectronics Letters (China), Journal of Electrical Engineering and Technology (Korea) and IETE (India) Journal for Students. Prof. Pal has extensive teaching, research, sponsored R&D, and consulting (for Indian and US industries) experience on various aspects of Fiber Optics and he has published and reported over 120 research papers and research reviews in peer reviewed international journals and conferences. He is co-author of the book entitled Fiber Optics and Instrumentation (in Russian, Mashinostroenie Publishing House, Leningrad, 1987) and has edited the books: Fundamentals of Fiber Optics in Telecommunication and Sensor Systems (Wiley Eastern, New Delhi and John Wiley, New York, 1992, 3rd reprint 2001) and Guided Wave Optical Components and Devices (Academic/Elsevier, Burlington, 2006).  He has also contributed by invitation 12 chapters in different books.  Prof. Pal is a Fellow of Optical Society of India and IETE and is a Member of the Optical Society of America and IEEE/LEOS.  He has been an invited speaker at over 22 international conferences held in India and abroad (including two plenary talks in China and Korea).  He is a recipient of the First Fiber Optic Person of the Year award in 1997 instituted by Lucent Technology in India, the Gowri Memorial Award for the year 1991 of IETE, IEEE/LEOS Distinguished lecturer for his contributions on Guided Wave Optical Components (2005-2007), and twice received best paper awards as co-author of device/technology oriented papers at two international conferences.  Prof. Pal is currently a member of the International Council of OSA (2007-2009), the Executive Council of the Optical Society of India, and Government of India’s Working Group on Nano-Science and Technology initiative (Department of Information Technology); he has been also chairperson of the National Technical Panel on All-fiber Components for the Department of Information Technology of the Indian Government.  His current research interests concern Microstructured optical Fibers, all-fiber components for DWDM and optical networks, dispersion compensators, and fiber optic sensors. (For more details see home page: http//:web.iitd.ac.in/~bppal)

_____________________________________________________
Fellow

Ci-Ling Pan

Contact:
National Tsing Hua University
Dept. of Physics
101, Sec. 2, Kuang Fu Road
Hsinchu
30013 Taiwan
Tel: +886-3-5742275
Fax: +886-3-5723052
clpan@phys.nthu.edu.tw
bishnupal@gmail.com
http://www.phys.nthu.edu.tw/e_teacher/clpan.html

Discussion Topics:

  • Specialty Optical Fibers
    Though fiber optics is now considered a mature technology, specialty fibers have become a new paradigm in fiber design. Microstructured optical fibers have been a latest addition to the variety of exotic and specialty optical fibers, which are often referred to as Photonic Crystal fibers and Photonic Band Gap fibers. The talk would focus on basic functional principle of optical wave guidance in such fibers vis-a-vis conventional fibers. Details of propagation and design & technology of 1D photonic band gap Bragg fibers would be described, in which we have recently made several research contributions and our collaborators in Russian Academy of Science have succeeded in fabricating some of our designed fibers.  We have demonstrated for the first time super-continuum generation from Bragg fibers. We have also proposed a new type of Bragg-like fibers, in which introduction of a certain amount of chirp in the periodic cladding of Bragg fibers can be exploited as a new design tool to enlarge the band gap and also reduce loss and dispersion. Variety of specialty fibers including microstructured fibers would be discussed in this discussion.     
  • All-Fiber Optical Component Technology Platforms for Optical Networks
    Today’s high-speed dense wavelength division multiplexed optical communication networks require a host of branching components for functions like signal splitting/combining, add/drop of signal-carrying wavelengths, wavelength multiplexing, signal taps, wavelength interleaving, wavelength filters, etc.  If these components could be realized in an all-fiber form, one has the advantage of integrating these in a network simply through fiber splicing.  The talk would be an attempt to describe three technology platforms namely, fused fiber couplers, side-polished fiber half couplers, and in-fiber gratings, which could yield a wide variety of such components in an all-fiber form and our own experience on in-house developments of these technologies.
  • Fiber Optic Sensors and Components
    Optical fiber sensors have attracted a great deal of attention in the last two decades as an alternate major application area of optical fibers besides their well known applications in telecommunication as optical signal transmission media. It was realized in mid-1970s itself that these fibers often show exceptional sensitivity to a host of environmental physical parameters, which could be exploited to configure these fibers as sensors to measure those parameters as measurands.  One of the most attractive features of optical fiber sensors is their inherent ability to provide distributed measurements.  Optical fibers have been indeed used as sensors to measure a variety of physical quantities like refractive index, pH, moisture ingress in concrete, strains in civil structures, large electric current in power utilities like current flow in a busbar, biological samples like infected cells, etc. The discussion would include our own research on a variety of these sensors.

060.0060   Fiber optics and optical communications
250.0250   Optoelectronics
000.2060   Education
060.1810   Buffers, couplers, routers, switches, and multiplexers
060.2270   Fiber characterization
060.2280   Fiber design and fabrication
060.2300   Fiber measurements
060.2310   Fiber optics
060.2320   Fiber optics amplifiers and oscillators
060.2330   Fiber optics communications
060.2340   Fiber optics components
060.2370   Fiber optics sensors
060.2390   Fiber optics, infrared
060.2400  Fiber properties, 
060.2410   Fibers, erbium
060.2430   Fibers, single-mode
060.3510  Lasers, fiber
060.4005  Microstructured fibers
060.5295   Photonic crystal fibers
130.2790   Guided waves

Speaker Credentials:

Bishnu P. Pal was born in Shillong, India on 3rd December 1948.  He received M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in Physics from Jadavpur University (Kolkata) and IIT Delhi in 1970 and 1975, respectively as a National Science Talent Search Scholar of NCERT (India). In late 1977 he joined the academic staff of IIT Delhi, where he is a Professor of Physics since 1990.  He has worked as Visiting Scholar/Visiting Professor in the area of Fiber Optics and Applications for various periods at the Norwegian Institute of Technology (Trondheim, Norway), the Fraunhofer Institute für Physikalische Messtechnik (Freiburg, Germany) as Alexander von Humboldt Fellow, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (Boulder, CO, USA) as a Fulbright Scholar, University of Strathclyde (Glasgow, UK), City University Hong Kong, and Universities at Nice and Limoges (France) as Visiting Professor/Scholar. He had been a member of the founding Editorial Advisory Board of the International Journal of Optoelectronics (1988-93) published by Taylor and Francis from UK and is currently a Member of the Editorial Board of Optoelectronics Letters (China), Journal of Electrical Engineering and Technology (Korea) and Journal of the Optical Society of Korea. Prof. Pal has extensive teaching, research, sponsored R&D, and consulting (for Indian and US industries) experience on various aspects of Fiber Optics and he has published and reported over 140 research papers and research reviews in peer reviewed international journals and conferences. He is co-author of the book entitled Fiber Optics and Instrumentation (in Russian, Mashinostroenie Publishing House, Leningrad, 1987) and has edited the books: Fundamentals of Fiber Optics in Telecommunication and Sensor Systems (Wiley Eastern, New Delhi and John Wiley, New York, 1992, 5th reprint 2008), Guided Wave Optical Components and Devices: Basics, Technology and Applications (Academic/Elsevier, Burlington, 2006), Free access book Frontiers in Guided Wave Optics and Optoelectronics (Intech, Vienna), and co-edited Fiber Optics through Experiments (Viva Books, New Delhi). He has also contributed by invitation 12 chapters in different books.  Prof. Pal is a Fellow of OSA, Optical Society of India, and IETE, Life Member of Indian Laser association (ILA), and is a Senior Member of IEEE.  He has been an invited speaker at over 30 international conferences held in India and abroad (including two plenary talks in China and Korea).  He is a recipient of the First Fiber Optic Person of the Year award in 1997 instituted by Lucent Technology in India, the Gowri Memorial Award for the year 1991 of IETE, IEEE/LEOS Distinguished lecturer for his contributions on Guided Wave Optical Components (2005-2007), Homi Bhabha National Award for significant contributions to Applied Physics by University Grants Commission (India), CEOT-IETE award for significant contributions to Optoelectronic Technology, and OSI award for life time contribution to Optics and Photonics. Prof. Pal has served a three-year term as a member of the International Council of OSA (2007-2009), is presently a member of the OSA Board, Long Term Planning Group (LTPG) of OSA, the Executive Council of the Optical Society of India (since 2004). His current research interests concern Microstructured optical Fibers, Localization of light in waveguides, All-fiber components for DWDM and optical networks, Dispersion compensators, and Fiber-optic sensors.