Plenary and Keynote Speakers

Asia Communications and Photonics Conference

10 - 13 November 2017
The Garden Hotel, Guangzhou, Guangdong China

Plenary and Keynote Speakers

David N. Payne
Eric Mazur
Connie Chang-Hasnain
Peter Winzer
Dimitra Simeonidou
Keith Nelson
 

David N. Payne

ORC, Univ. of Southampton, UK and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

No Gain Without Payne
Saturday, 11 November, 08:15–09:00
Garden Grand Ballroom

Abstract: Following in the footsteps of Marconi and the revolution of wireless, the internet is perhaps the most important and life-changing invention of the 20th century.  It too required the invention of a new global communication medium capable of carrying vast quantities of information across trans-oceanic distances, reliably, cheaply and efficiently.  This turned out to be the unpredictable, unlikely and extraordinary role of optical fibres made from the two most common elements of the earth’s crust, silicon and oxygen (silica). In recognition of the huge impact of his silica fibre invention, Charles Kao was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 2009, while Charles Townes, who provided the laser, was similarly honoured in 1964.  An all-optical fibre internet demanded an all-optical amplifier and this followed in 1987. The Erbium-Doped Fibre Amplifier proved to be the last piece in the puzzle that allowed vast distances to be spanned with huge bandwidth.

Biography: Professor Sir David Neil Payne CBE FRS FREng is a leading Professor at the University of Southampton and Director of the Optoelectronics Research Centre. A world class pioneer of technology, his work has had a great impact on telecommunications and laser technology over the last forty years. The vast transmission capacity of today’s internet results directly from the erbium-doped fibre amplifier (EDFA) invented by David and his team in the 1980s. His pioneering work in fibre
fabrication in the 70s resulted in almost all of the special fibres in use today including fibre lasers which are currently undergoing rapid growth for application in manufacturing and defence. David has made numerous leading contributions to many diverse fields of photonics and is widely acknowledged as an inventor of key components. Currently, his main research interest is high-power fibre lasers. With US funding, he led the team that broke the kilowatt barrier for fibre laser output to international acclaim and now holds many other fibre laser performance records. An original member of the Highly Cited Researchers (USA) he is honoured
as one of the most referenced, influential researchers in the world. He has published over 650 Conference and Journal papers and is a frequent plenary and invited speaker at major international optics conferences. As an entrepreneur David’s activities have led to a cluster of 11 photonics spin out companies in and around Southampton - helping to boost the local economy. He founded SPI Lasers PLC, which has recently been purchased by the Trumpf Corporation of Germany for $40M. Recently elected Chairman of the Marconi Society and to the Russian Academy of Sciences, David is a fellow of the Royal Society and the Royal Academy of Engineering. He became a Commander of the British Empire in the 2007 New Years Honours list. In addition he has been awarded the top American, European and Japanese prizes in photonics. Recent awards include the Marconi Prize in 2008 and the 2007 IEE Photonics Award the first to be awarded to a person outside the USA. Most recently, in 2010, David received the AILU (Association of Laser Users) Award for his pioneering work with fibre lasers.

Eric Mazur

Harvard Univ., USA

Extreme Optics with Zero Refractive Index
Saturday, 11 November, 09:00–09:45
Garden Grand Ballroom

Abstract: Nanotechnology has enabled the development of nanostructured composite materials (metamaterials) with exotic optical properties not found in nature. In the most extreme case, we can create materials which support light waves that propagate with infinite phase velocity, corresponding to a refractive index of zero. This zero index can only be achieved by simultaneously controlling the electric and magnetic resonances of the nanostructure.  We present an in-plane metamaterial design consisting of silicon pillar arrays, embedded within a polymer matrix and sandwiched between gold layers. Using an integrated nano- scale prism constructed of the proposed material, we demonstrate unambiguously a refractive index of zero in the optical regime. This design serves as a novel on-chip platform to explore the exotic physics of zero-index metamaterials, with applications to super-coupling, integrated quantum optics, and phase matching.

Biography: Eric Mazur is the Balkanski Professor of Physics and Applied Physics and Dean of Applied Physics at Harvard University, Member of the Faculty of Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and President of the Optical Society. Mazur is a prominent physicist known for his contributions in nanophotonics, an internationally recognized educational innovator, and a sought after speaker. In education he is widely known for his work on Peer Instruction, an interactive teaching method aimed at engaging students in the classroom and beyond. In 2014 Mazur became the inaugural recipient of the Minerva Prize for Advancements in Higher Education. He has received many awards for his work in physics and in education and has founded several successful companies. Mazur is Chief Academic Advisor for
Turning Technologies, a company developing interactive response systems for the education market. Mazur has widely published in peer-reviewed journals and holds numerous patents. He has also written extensively on education and is the author of Peer Instruction: A User’s Manual (Prentice Hall, 1997), a book that explains how to teach large lecture classes interactively, and of the Principles and Practice of Physics (Pearson, 2015), a book that presents a groundbreaking new approach to teaching introductory calculus-based physics. Mazur is a leading speaker on optics and on education. His motivational lectures on interactive teaching, educational
technology, and assessment have inspired people around the world to change their approach to teaching.
 

Connie Chang-Hasnain

Univ. of California, Berkeley, USA

VCSEL Arrays for 3D Sensing and Imaging
Saturday, 11 November, 09:45–10:30
Garden Grand Ballroom

Abstract: Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) have long been predicted as low-cost enabling laser sources for many applications including optical communications, sensing and imaging. In this talk, I will discuss inventions and advances made in the last two decades and recently, all of which have led to recent wide deployment of commercial applications including LIDAR, 3D sensing and optical coherent
tomography applications.

Biography: Connie Chang-Hasnain is Associate Dean for Strategic Alliances of College of Engineering and Whinnery Distinguished Chair Professor in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, at the University of California, Berkeley.  She has been the Founding Co-Director of Tsinghua-Berkeley Shenzhen Institute since 2015. She is also the Chief Academic Officer of Berkeley Education Alliance for Research in Singapore (BEARS) and Proram Leader of BEARS’ SinBeRISE (Singapore Berkeley Research Initiative on Sustainable Energy) program since April 2015. Prof. Chang-Hasnain received her Ph.D. from UC Berkeley in 1987. Prior to joining the Berkeley faculty, Dr. Chang-Hasnain was a member of the technical staff at Bellcore (1987–1992) and Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University (1992–1995). Professor Chang-Hasnain has been honored with many awards including the UNESCO Medal For the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnologies (2015), IEEE David Sarnoff Award (2011), the OSA Nick Holonyak Jr. Award (2007), etc. Additionally, she has been awarded with a National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellowship by the US Department of Defense (2008), a Humboldt Research Award (2009), and a Guggenheim Fellowship
(2009). She was a member of the USAF Scientific Advisory Board, the IEEE LEOS Board of Governors, OSA Board of Directors, and the Board on Assessment of NIST Programs, National Research Council. She was the Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Lightwave Technology 2007-2012.

Peter Winzer

Nokia Bell Laboratories, USA

Future Network Scaling and the Need for Massive Opto-Electronic Array Integration
Saturday, 11 November,, 10:45–11:30
Garden Grand Ballroom

Abstract: The evolution of network traffic and of associated communications technologies reveals clear long-term disparities, leaving no
other option than introducing massively integrated parallelism to implement 10-Terabit/s transponders and Petabit/s systems well within 10 years.

Biography: Peter J. Winzer received his Ph.D. from the Vienna University of Technology, Austria, where he worked on space-borne lidar and laser communications for the European Space Agency.  At Bell Labs since 2000, he has focused on many aspects of fiber-optic communications, including advanced optical modulation, multiplexing, and detection. He has contributed to several high-speed optical transmission records and field trials from 100 Gb/s to 1 Tb/s and has been globally promoting spatial multiplexing to overcome the optical networks capacity crunch. He has widely published and patented and is actively involved with the IEEE Photonics Society and the OSA, including service as Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE/OSA Journal of Lightwave Technology, Program Chair of ECOC 2009, and Program/General Chair of OFC 2015/17. Dr. Winzer is a Highly Cited Researcher, a Bell Labs Fellow, a Fellow of the IEEE and the OSA, and an elected member of the US
National Academy of Engineering.

Dimitra Simeonidou

Univ. of Bristol, UK

Ultimate Optical-Wireless Network Convergence: Vision, Architecture and Real-Life Deployments
Saturday, 11 November,11:30–12:15
Garden Grand Ballroom

Abstract: This plenary will discuss key enablers for technology agnostic optical-wireless network convergence including: Open software and hardware solutions; Function programmable network infrastructures; Prototyping and system evaluation; Real life 5G urban deployments; Lessons learned and opportunities

Biography: Dimitra is a Full Professor at the University of Bristol, the Director of the Smart Internet Lab (www.bristol.ac.uk/smart), the Chief Scientific Officer (CSO) of Bristol Is Open and the Head of the High Performance Networks group (HPN), a Royal Society Wolfson scholar. Since 2015, Dimitra has been the technical
architect and the CSO of the smart city project Bristol Is Open (www.bristolisopen.com), delivering the world’s first open and programmable experimental test-bed at city-scale. Her research is focusing in the fields of High Performance Networks, Software Defined Networking, Network Convergence and Smart City infrastructures. She is the author and co-author of over 400 publications, numerous patents and several major contributions to standards. She worked in Alcatel Submarine Networks as a Principle Engineer and she has been co-founder of two spin-out companies. The latest company is the University of Bristol, venture capital funded, spin-out Zeetta Networks (http://www.zeetta.com), delivering SDN solutions for enterprise networks. Since 2015, Dimitra has been the technical architect and the CSO of the
smart city project Bristol Is Open (www.bristolisopen.com), delivering the world’s first open and programmable experimental test-bed at city-scale.


Keith Nelson

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

Keynote Banquet Talk: Nonlinear terahertz spectroscopy: Driving electrons, ions, dipoles, and spins
Sunday, 12 November, 18:45–19:15
Garden Grand Ballroom, The Garden Hotel

Biography: Keith Nelson received his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from Stanford University in 1981, and after a postdoctoral stint at UCLA he joined the faculty
at MIT in 1982. He has worked on discovery of new lightmatter interactions and their exploitation for spectroscopy and control of coherent acoustic waves, lattice and molecular vibrations, excitons, spins, and their admixtures with light. He has developed novel methods for study of solid-state chemical reactions, crystals near phase transitions, glassforming liquids, electronic excited-state dynamics, thermal transport, and matter far from equilibrium. He has pioneered tabletop generation of strong terahertz-frequency fields and nonlinear terahertz spectroscopy.