Travel & Transportation

Travel & Transportation

New Orleans, with its richly mottled old buildings, its sly, sophisticated - sometimes almost disreputable - air, and its Hispanic-Gallic traditions, has more the flavor of an old European capital than an American city. Townhouses in the French Quarter, with their courtyards and carriageways, are thought by some scholars to be related on a small scale to certain Parisian "hotels" - princely urban residences of the 17th and 18th centuries. Visitors particularly remember the decorative cast-iron balconies that cover many of these townhouses like ornamental filigree cages.

European influence is also seen in the city's famous above-ground cemeteries. The practice of interring people in large, richly adorned aboveground tombs dates from the period when New Orleans was under Spanish rule. These hugely popular "cities of the dead" have been and continue to be an item of great interest to visitors. Mark Twain, noting that New Orleanians did not have conventional below-ground burials, quipped that "few of the living complain and none of the other."

One of the truly amazing aspects of New Orleans architecture is the sheer number of historic homes and buildings per square mile. Orleanians never seem to replace anything. Consider this: Uptown, the City's largest historic district, has almost 11,000 buildings, 82 percent of which were built before 1935 - truly a "time warp."

The spine of Uptown, and much of New Orleans, is the city's grand residential showcase, St. Charles Avenue, which the novel A Confederacy of Dunces aptly describes: "The ancient oaks of St. Charles Avenue arched over the avenue like a canopy...St. Charles Avenue must be the loveliest place in the world. From time to time...passed the slowing rocking streetcars that seemed to be leisurely moving toward no special designations, following their route through the old mansions on either side...everything looked so calm, so prosperous."

New Orleans' architectural character is unlike that of any other American city. A delight to both natives and visitors, it presents such a variety that even after many years of study, one can still find things unique and undiscovered.

Letters of Invitation

Individuals requiring letters of invitation to obtain travel visas may access the online form at Invitation Letter Request Form.

Important information regarding Visa Invitation Letters:

  • Your name must be listed exactly as it appears on your passport. Any differences between the name on your passport and the name on your invitation letter or other documentation could lead to a delay and/or denial of your visa.
  • If you are presenting a paper, include the title and session in which the paper will be presented.
  • Please note that each individual requesting an invitation letter must fill out a separate form.
  • All letters of invitation will be sent by a locked PDF unless otherwise requested. If you require a paper copy please provide a courier account number or credit card number with expiration date with the original request.
  • Please allow up to 15 business days to process your request.
  • OSA Management reserves the right to request further information regarding the company or affiliation of the attendee to ensure the validity of requests. Meeting attendees do not need to wait until your paper is accepted to request a Visa Invitation Letter.
  • OSA is unable to contact U.S. Embassies in support of an individual attempting to gain entry to attend a meeting.
  • We recommend that you secure your travel visa before registering for the conference as cancellations after the preregistration cutoff may result in a cancellation fee.

For questions about the Visa Invitation Letter application process, email invitations@osa.org.
 




 
Apply now for your US Visa

If you need a travel visa, begin the visa application process now! The application process can take up to 6 months or more. We strongly encourage you to apply for your visa as early as possible, but no later than three months before you wish to enter the United States. Strict security requirements may cause delays in visa processing. More information about applying for a United States visa is available at U.S. VISAs

Online Resources:
U.S. Customs and Border Information
VWP and ESTA Frequently Asked Questions
U.S. State Department Visa Information
Department of Homeland Security
National Academies International Visitors Office
 
ESTA Application

STA is an automated system that determines the eligibility of visitors to travel to the United States under the Visa Waiver Program (VWP). Authorization via ESTA does not determine whether a traveler is admissible to the United States. U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers determine admissibility upon travelers’ arrival. The ESTA application collects biographic information and answers to VWP eligibility questions. ESTA applications may be submitted at any time prior to travel, though it is recommended that travelers apply as soon as they begin preparing travel plans or prior to purchasing airline tickets.
 

Airport Express Transportation Options

202 Airport Express – To get to or from the airport, you can use the RTA’s 202 Airport Express, which travels from the airport terminals to Elk Place at Canal Street in downtown New Orleans.

The fare is $1.50 and the bus makes 9 daily trips to New Orleans. For more information, you can visit the New Orleans RTA website here.

Jefferson Transit E2 Airport Route – The E2 Airport Route provides service from New Orleans International Airport into the New Orleans Central Business District. It travels to the intersection of Tulane Avenue and Loyola Avenue, conveniently located near the Hyatt Regency and various major hotels in the city. Additionally, the Jefferson Transit E2 Airport Bus stops in Mid-City, at the intersection of Tulane Avenue and S. Carrollton Avenue.

The fare is $2.00 to get to the Central Business District, and you can transfer to a NORTA streetcar or bus when you arrive downtown at the Union Passenger Terminal. You can also use a Jazzy Pass if you’re planning on taking public transportation throughout your trip in New Orleans - it will save you time and money!

The New Orleans Regional Transit Authority has made it easy to find your route and track the bus you’re looking for.
Find out exactly when your bus will arrive with the Transit Tracker.You can also use Trip Planner to help you find exactly what routes to take to get to your destination. And now you can download the free RTA gomobile app to pay for your fare instantly on your phone.

For more information on bus routes and public transportation, check out the RTA’s website at www.norta.com.
 
Cabs and Taxis

Alliance
(504) 872-0221
Neighborhood: Gentilly/New Orleans East/Chalmette
 
American Taxi
(504) 299-0386
Neighborhood: Treme
 
Checker Cab
(504) 207-7777
Neighborhood: Mid-City

Yellow Cab
(504) 207-7777
 
Liberty Bell
(504) 821-8222
Neighborhood: Mid-City
 
Nawlins Cab
(504) 522-9059
www.nawlinscab.com  
 
http://www.neworleansonline.com/images/teasers/A.streetcar.jpgStreetcars
All aboard for a trip into New Orleans' past on the oldest continuously operating streetcar in the world!

Getting around New Orleans by streetcar is a great way to see the city. There are three different lines: St. Charles, Canal Street, and the Riverfront, each of which originates downtown but takes you different parts of the city.

Streetcars in New Orleans offer $1.25 fares and can be paid with exact change when you board. One, three, and 31-day unlimited ride “Jazzy Passes” are also available for $3, $9 and $55 respectively.

See the Regional Transit Authority (RTA)'s website for a list of places to purchase these. You can also download the RTA gomobile app and pay your fare instantly from your phone! Please note that passes are non-refundable and non-replaceable.

Fares listed above and routes and schedules listed below are subject to change – check directly with the RTA directly for the latest information.
 
New Orleans Maps
With these maps you'll be able to navigate to and within New Orleans like a native.
 
Parking
Parking at the Astor Crowne Plaza is $41 plus tax per 24-hour period.


Fares Offered: Up to 10% discount on applicable fares
Meeting Promotional Code: NMPDC
Travel Dates: 19 July - 1 August, 2017
Origin: Any Delta Airlines City
Destination: Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport (MSY)

 
Reservations and ticketing is available via www.delta.com/meetings or by calling our Delta Meeting 
Network Reservations at 800-328-1111. When booking online at www.delta.com/meetings, select 'Book Your 
Flight' and enter your Meeting Code in the box provided on the Search Flight page.


Fares Offered: Up to 10% discount on applicable fares
Meeting Promotional Code: ZXJP194880
Travel Dates: 21 July - 30 July, 2017
Origin: Any United Airlines City
Destination: Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport (MSY)

Reservations and ticketing is available at https://www.united.com. When booking online, enter ZXJP194880 in the Offer Code Box. If booking through a travel professional or United Meetings at +1 800.426.1122, please provide them with the following offer code: ZXJP194880. 
 
For reservations outside of the United States, please call your local United Airlines Reservation Office. 

Amtrak offers a 10% discount off the lowest available rail fare to New Orleans, LA between the above dates.  This discount is valid from July 21, 2017 – July 30, 2017 To book your reservation call Amtrak at 1 (800) 872-7245 or contact your local travel agent. Please refer to Convention Fare Code X40D-961 when making your reservation. Conventions discounts cannot be booked via Internet. This offer is not valid on the Auto Train and Acela service. Offer valid with Sleepers, Business Class or First Class seats with payment of the full applicable accommodation charges. Fare is valid on Amtrak Regional all departures seven days a week, except for holiday blackouts. 

Our special discounts are available for 7 days before the event and 7 days after the event. These discounts are available on a wide selection of vehicles from eco friendly and fuel efficient compacts and hybrids to stylish premium and luxury sedans. 

When booking Use Avis Worldwide Discount (AWD) NumberD340737 when you reserve online or call 1-800-5257537-1600.  Take in the sights, explore the surroundings and enjoy the ride!

SuperShuttle offers a 10% discount to all Advance Photonics Congress attendees.  Make your reservations online now or call 1800-BLUEVAN (1-800-258-3826).

New Orleans, with its richly mottled old buildings, its sly, sophisticated - sometimes almost disreputable - air, and its Hispanic-Gallic traditions, has more the flavor of an old European capital than an American city. 

European influence is also seen in the city's famous above-ground cemeteries. The practice of interring people in large, richly adorned aboveground tombs dates from the period when New Orleans was under Spanish rule. These hugely popular "cities of the dead" have been and continue to be an item of great interest to visitors. Mark Twain, noting that New Orleanians did not have conventional below-ground burials, quipped that "few of the living complain and none of the other."

One of the truly amazing aspects of New Orleans architecture is the sheer number of historic homes and buildings per square mile. Orleanians never seem to replace anything. Consider this: Uptown, the City's largest historic district, has almost 11,000 buildings, 82 percent of which were built before 1935 - truly a "time warp."

The spine of Uptown, and much of New Orleans, is the city's grand residential showcase, St. Charles Avenue, which the novel A Confederacy of Dunces aptly describes: "The ancient oaks of St. Charles Avenue arched over the avenue like a canopy...St. Charles Avenue must be the loveliest place in the world. From time to time...passed the slowing rocking streetcars that seemed to be leisurely moving toward no special designations, following their route through the old mansions on either side...everything looked so calm, so prosperous."

New Orleans' architectural character is unlike that of any other American city. A delight to both natives and visitors, it presents such a variety that even after many years of study, one can still find things unique and undiscovered.
 
 
Downtown and Warehouse District
In New Orleans, the Central Business District (CBD) is the city's downtown. The boundaries for the CBD roughly fall at Canal Street to Poydras and from Claiborne Avenue to Tchoupitoulas Street. Due to its close proximity to the French Quarter many of the city's hotels reside within the CBD. The neighborhood is also home to some of New Orleans favorite cocktail bars and many fabulous restaurants... more Downtown and Warehouse District info
Marigny Faubourg Marigny & Bywater
Nestled just down river (east) from the French Quarter are two of New Orleans' most distinct and well-kept secrets: the Faubourg Marigny and Bywater neighborhoods. Both neighborhoods are only minutes away from the French Quarter, yet, are tucked back into their own diverse communities, combining old-time New Orleans culture with a hip, contemporary bohemianism... more Faubourg Marigny & Bywater info