Plenary and Tutorial Speakers

Plenary and Tutorial Speakers

Plenary Speakers
Ben EggletonBen Eggleton, University of Sydney, Australia
Inducing and Harnessing Photon-phonon Interactions in Nanoscale Integrated Circuits

Professor Benjamin Eggleton is an ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Physics at the University of Sydney, Director of the ARC Centre for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), and Director of the Institute of Photonics and Optical Science (IPOS) at the University of Sydney. He obtained the Bachelor's degree (with honors) in Science in 1992 and Ph.D. degree in Physics from the University of Sydney in 1996.


Shu Namiki
Shu Namiki, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan
Challenges and Impact of Dynamic Optical-Layer Switching - Ten years of VICTORIES and Beyond

Shu Namiki is a Director of Data Photonics Project Unit of the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Japan. His current research interests include software defined dynamic optical path networking and their enabling devices such as nonlinear fiber-optics and silicon photonics. He is currently serving as Chair of Executive Committee of a national project called “Vertically Integrated Center for Technologies of Optical Routing toward Ideal Energy Savings (VICTORIES)” in collaboration with ten telecom-related companies. He has co-authored more than 300 conference presentations, papers, book chapters, articles, and patents. Dr. Namiki is a Fellow of OSA, and a member of IEICE, JSAP, and IEEE Photonics Society and Communications Society

Dirk Richter
Dimitra Simeonidou, University of Bristol, UK
Lighting the Way Towards a New Era of Digital Transformation
 

Dimitra Simeonidou is full Professor and Head of the High Performance Networks group at University of Bristol in the UK. Dimitra is a leading academic in Optical Networks, Future Internet Research and Experimentation (FIRE), Grid and Cloud Computing, and one of the initial contributors of Transport Software Defined Networking. She has chaired a number of international conferences and committees across these technical fields. She is the author and co-author of over 350 invited and contributed publications of which many have received best paper awards, 11 patents and standards.

Tutorial Speakers

Svetlana BoriskinaSvetlana Boriskina, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Novel Optical Materials and Applications (NOMA)

Topological Materials: New Horizons for Energy and Sustainability

Svetlana V. Boriskina is a Research Scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), USA. Her research blends nanophotonics, plasmonics, hydrodynamics, thermodynamics and mechanics to explore intricate details of light-matter interaction on the nanoscale. Svetlana is interested in fundamental aspects of energy transfer between quantum emitters, propagating and trapped photons, electron plasma oscillations (plasmons) and nanomechanical oscillations as well as in thermodynamic limitations on light trapping and energy conversion. These fundamental studies have already directly contributed to the development of new multi-functional devices and nanostructured materials for applications ranging from light generation and optical information processing to bio(chemical)sensing and solar energy harvesting and conversion.

Barry RandBarry Rand, Princeton University, USA
Novel Optical Materials and Applications (NOMA)

Metal Halide Perovskites: Processing, Interfaces, and Light Emitting Devices
We study the use of metal halide perovskites for light emitting diodes (LEDs). By understanding interface chemistry and improving film formation, we demonstrate green and red perovskite LEDs with external quantum efficiencies of approximately 10%.

Barry Rand earned a BE in electrical engineering from The Cooper Union in 2001. Then he received MA and PhD degrees in electrical engineering from Princeton University, in 2003 and 2007, respectively. From 2007 to 2013, he was at imec in Leuven, Belgium. Since 2013, he is an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment at Princeton University. He has authored more than 85 refereed journal publications, has 19 issued US patents, and has received the 3M Nontenured Faculty Award (2014), DuPont Young Professor Award (2015), DARPA Young Faculty Award (2015), and ONR Young Investigator Program Award (2016).

FFrans Willemsrans M.J. Willems, TU Eindhoven, The Netherlands
Signal Processing in Photonics Communications (SPPCom)

Information Theory and its Application to Optical Communication
The tutorial focuses on the foundations of communication which were developed and are further investigated within the field of information theory. The lecture starts with the equivalence between waveform and vector communication in the additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) case. Then the capacity of the AWGN channel is discussed and we briefly focus on the error-correcting codes that achieve capacity. It turns out that for larger signal- to-noise ratios codes based on uniform signalling do not achieve capacity. Shaping methods are required to close the gap. We will discuss enumerative shaping techniques, and will demonstrate that their performance is good also at small block-lengths.

In the second part of the tutorial we will discuss communication over optical channels with intensity modulation and direct detection. We will show that by using the so-called square- root transform this channel becomes equivalent to a one-sided AWGN channel. This result makes it possible to directly apply the signal processing techniques that were developed for the AWGN case. The tutorial ends with some consequences of the square-root transform (signalling on a square grid, dependence of signal-to-noise ratio on distance, filtering in the optical domain). 

Frans M.J. Willems was born in Stein, The Netherlands, on June 26, 1954. He received the M.Sc. degree in electrical engineering from Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands, and the Ph.D. degree from the Catholic University of Louvain, Louvain, Belgium, in 1979 and 1982 respectively. From 1979 to 1982 he was a research assistant at the Catholic University of Louvain. Since 1982, he is a staff member at the Electrical Engineering Department of Eindhoven University of Technology. His research contributions are in the areas of multi-user information theory and noiseless source coding. Dr. Willems received the Marconi Young Scientist Award in 1982. From 1988 to 1990, he served as Associate Editor for Shannon Theory for the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory. He is co-recipient of the 1996 IEEE Information Theory Society Paper Award. From 1998 to 2000 he was a member of the Board of Governors of the IEEE Information Theory Society. Since 1999 he is connected to Philips Research Laboratories as an advisor. From 2001 to 2004 he served as an Associate Editor for Information Theory for the European Transactions on Telecommunications. Dr. Willems is a Fellow of the IEEE since 2005.