Mathematics in Imaging

Mathematics in Imaging

Mathematical Imaging covers mathematical and computational methods for modeling the physics of imaging methods and for providing stable and resolved solutions to the inverse problem of image reconstruction.

It captures leading edge fundamental developments in imaging science and has applications in photonics, biomedical imaging, astronomy, and remote sensing. Imaging methods are constrained by the experimental data which are corrupted by measurement and medium noises and depend nonlinearly on the imaged object material and geometric parameters. Many of the fundamental problems in image reconstruction methods are shared across different disciplines, including optics, acoustics, seismic imaging, and synthetic aperture radar. These include optimal representations, resolution and stability estimates, optimal design approaches, and model reduction techniques.

Mathematical Imaging provides a platform for a cross fertilization between mathematical, computational, physical, and engineering disciplines related to imaging and inverse problems. Because of the breadth involved, papers highlighting either the interdisciplinary flavor of imaging methodologies or the fundamental mathematical and computational issues in imaging are particularly encouraged.


  • Inverse scattering, regularization, constraints,  inversion in the multiple scattering regime
  • Shape optimization
  •  Blind deconvolution
  • Coherent imaging systems (holographic imaging, synthetic aperture radar ...)
  • Phaseless imaging (X-ray imaging ...)
  • 3D imaging (tomographies, microscopy ...)
  • Imaging through turbulent, random or highly scattering media
  • Biomedical imaging and hybrid imaging
  • Biomimetic imaging
  • Superresolution
  • Inverse problems related to design of metamaterials, metasurfaces, and cloaking
Marc Allain, Fresnel InstitutFrancePromoting Blindness in Structured Illumination Microscopy, Invited

Alexandre Aubry, Institut LangevinFranceSmart Optical Coherence Tomography for Ultra-deep Imaging Through Highly Scattering Media , Invited

George Barbastathis, Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyUnited StatesOn the use of Deep Learning Techniques for Electromagnetic Inverse Problems , Invited

Yonina Eldar, Technion Israel Institute of TechnologyIsraelPhase Retrieval in Optical Imaging , Invited

Axel Flinth, Technische Universität BerlinGermanyDifferent Aspects of l1,2-Minimization, Invited

Vincent Ginis, Vrije Universiteit BrusselBelgiumWhat Can We Learn from the Waves Scattered off Mie Particles Trapped in an Evanescent Field? , Invited

Vivek Goyal, Boston UniversityUnited StatesA Few Good Photons: Unmixing to Mitigate High Ambient Light Levels in Active Imaging , Invited

Michael Hart, The University of ArizonaUnited StatesImaging Through Turbulence, Invited

Ulugbek Kamilov, Mitsubishi Electric Research LaboratorieUnited StatesSEAGLE: Robust Computational Imaging under Multiple Scattering, Invited

Geoffroy Lerozey , Institut Langevin ParisSubwavelength Focusing and Imaging from the Far Field using Time Reversal in Subwavelength Scaled Resonant Media , Invited

Chrysanthe Preza, University of MemphisUnited StatesDeconvolution with Varying Point Spread Functions , Invited

Saiprasad Ravishankar, University of MichiganUnited StatesData-driven Models and Approaches for Imaging, Invited

Thomas Strohmer, University of California DavisUnited StatesYou Can Have It All - Fast Algorithms for Blind Deconvolution, Self-Calibration, and Demixing , Invited

Tanja Tarvainen, University of Eastern FinlandFinlandImage reconstruction and uncertainty quantification in photoacoustic tomography, Invited

Lei Tian, Boston UniversityUnited StatesComputational High-throughput Microscopy Using Coded Illumination , Invited

Laura Waller, University of California BerkeleyUnited StatesAlgorithmic Self-calibration in Computational Imaging , Invited

Chair

Peter DoerschukCornell University, United States
Anne SentenacFresnel Institut, France
Markus TestorfDartmouth College, United States

Member

P. Scott CarneyUniversity of Rochester, United States
Lorenzo CroccoConsiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Italy
Christine DeMolUniversite Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium
Mathias FinkEcole Sup Physique Chimie Industrielles, France
Josselin GarnierUniversite Paris-Diderot Paris VII, France
Rainer HeintzmannFriedrich-Schiller University Jena, Germany
YongKeun ParkKorea Advanced Inst of Science & Tech, South Korea
Michael UnserEcole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland
Pierre Weissinstitut de mathematiques de toulouse, France

Congress Welcome Reception
Monday, 26 June, 18:00-19:30

Join your fellow attendees for the Congress Reception. The reception is open to committee/presenting author/student and full conference attendees. Conference attendees may purchase extra tickets for their guest.
 
Keynote (AIO/IS)
Tuesday, 27 June, 10:45-12:15

Speaker: Tish Shute, Futurewei (Huawei), USA, XR and The Future of Communications: From Silicon to Human Photonics
 
AR/AR will evolve into XR to become the future interface for Cloud Computing, IoT, Big Data, Prediction, Self-driving Cars, Personalized Medicine, Robots, Drones, Cryptocurrency, Smart Cities, and AI. XR is intelligent and interactive connecting us in new ways to each other and uniting human and machine intelligence in a space shared and understood by both. The convergence of CV and AI is powering this paradigm shift in computing but display technologies still lag behind. New display technologies that operate at the intersection of engineering and perception are essential for the realization of XR. This talk will look at the promise of XR, and the challenge of fitting the puzzle pieces together.
 

Student & Early Career Professional Development & Networking Lunch and Learn
Tuesday, 27 June, 12:15 – 14:00

Join us for an interactive lunch and learn program focused on professional development within the Imaging and Applied Optics field. This program will engage students and early career professionals with the key leaders in the field who will share their professional development journey and provide useful tips to those who attend. Lunch will be provided. Programs are open to OSA Members. 


AIO Panel : The View from the Ladder:  Perceptions on the Future of Photonics
Tuesday, 27 June, 16:45 – 17:45 
 
Perceptions are often governed by the experience of the individual. Here panelists at various stages in their career and seniority will discuss the current and future outlook of the photonics industry as well as the role of collaboration and consolidation in the market.  From fresh perspectives to seasoned analyses, this session will also explore what the optics community can do to shape the future of photonics technology. 
 
Panelist:
Gregory Quarles, The Optical Society, USA
Martin Garbos, Buerkert Werke GmbH, Germany
Mark Itzler, Princenton Lightwave, USA
Anna Rissanen, VTT Technical Research Center, Finland

Joint Poster Session
Tuesday, 27 June, 17:45-19:15

Posters are an integral part of the technical program and offer a unique networking opportunity, where presenters can discuss their results one-to-one with interested parties. Each author is provided with a board on which to display the summary and results of his or her paper. 

AIO Panel: Start-ups, Incubators, Accelerators, Oh My!
Wednesday, 28 June, 16:45 – 17:45
 
What if an entrepreneur could put themselves in the shoes of the investors they pitch to? Would the ideas be pitched differently? Would the ask be different? What are the specific challenges of a photonics entrepreneur, and what are ways to address those challenges?

Panelists:
Laura Smoliar, Berkeley Catalyst Fund, USA
John Brewer, Amorphyx, USA

IS Panel: When Two Cameras Are Better Than One
Thursday, 29 June, 11:15- 12:15

Using multiple cameras to form a single image is going mainstream this year, with many new smartphones including this feature. The claims include continuous zoom, improved dynamic range and resolution, and depth sensing, all in a smaller and lighter system than an equivalent single lens camera. In this session a panel of academic and industry experts will discuss the multi-camera trend in the consumer imaging industry. Now that the approach has become practical, it is a good time to explore the key technologies, design trade-offs and performance limits.
 
Moderator:  Chris Dainty, FotoNation, UCL, Ireland
 
Panelists:
Ram Nararyanswamy, Occipital, USA
Rajiv Laroia, Light
Andrew Harvey, Univ. of Glasgow, UK
Alex Drimbarean, FotoNation, Ireland

Plenary Speakers

John Schwartzman
John Schwartzman Productions, USA
 

Advanced Imaging used in Cinematography 

The presentation will discuss how the job of the cinematographer has evolved in recent years.  In the analog film era change and evolution were measured by subtle improvements in both lens technology and film stocks but the advent of digital technology, both photographic and computer, has dramatically changed the way a cinematographer works.  The cinematographers job is still that of visual storytelling but the number of tools available to accomplish this task grow everyday, we are an art form that bastardizes technology to fit our needs.  It will walk you through the changes in my craft over the last 20 years, sometimes my needs run in parallel to innovations in optical imaging and many times they run counter.


Bio: John Schwartzman, ASC is an award-winning cinematographer whose work encompasses some of cinema’s biggest action and comedy blockbusters, including the $1.67 billion-earning worldwide box office monster hit Jurassic World; Marc Webb’s The Amazing Spider-Man; Michael Bay’s Armageddon; Jay Roach’s Meet the Fockers; John Lee Hancock’s Saving Mr. Banks; and Gary Shore’s Dracula Untold. Twice nominated for the coveted American Society of Cinematographers Award for Outstanding Achievement in Cinematography in Theatrical Releases, Schwartzman won in 2004 for his work on Gary Ross’ Seabiscuit, for which he also received an Academy Award® nomination.  His additional film credits include Bay’s Pearl Harbor, Michel Gondry’s The Green Hornet, Rob Reiner’s The Bucket List, Hancock’s The Rookie and Shawn Levy’s Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian.  His work will next be seen in two upcoming features:  John Lee Hancock’s The Founder, starring Michael Keaton, and Colin Trevorrow’s The Book of Henry, with Naomi Watts.  He is also slated to shoot the upcoming Star Wars: Episode IX, for release in 2019. In addition to his work on the big screen, Schwartzman is one of the commercial industry’s most sought-after cameramen.  His commercial work, as both director and cinematographer, includes spots for a wide range of national and international clients, such as HBO, Chevrolet, Visa, Toyota, American Express, Mercedes-Benz, AT&T, Honda, Victoria’s Secret, Coca-Cola, Canon, Reebok and Nike.

 

Mohan Trivedi
University of California San Diego, USA

A Quest for Human-Robot Cohabitation in the Age of Self Driving Automobiles

With recent advances in imaging sensors, embedded computing, machine per - ception, learning, planning and control, intelligent vehicle technology is moving tantalizingly closer to a future with large scale deployment of self-driving automobiles on roadways. However, we are also realizing that many important issues need deeper examination so that the safety, reliability and robustness of these highly complex systems can be assured. Toward this end, we highlight research issues as they relate to the understanding of human agents interacting with the automated vehicle, who are either occupants of such vehicles, or who are in the near vicinity of the vehicles. The design of intelligent driver assistance systems, especially those for active safety that prevent accidents, requires accurate understanding of human behavior, modeling of human-vehicle interactions, activities inside the cockpit, and prediction of human intent. The main idea is to develop an approach to properly design, implement and evaluate methods and computational frame- works for distributed systems where intelligent robots and humans cohabit, with proper understanding of mutual goals, plans, intentions, risks and safety parameters. Moving toward vehicles with higher autonomy opens new research avenues in dealing with learning, modeling, active control, perception of dynamic events, and novel architectures for distributed cogni- tive systems. This presentation will give examples of some of the accomplishments in the design of such systems and also highlight important research challenges yet to be overcome.
 

Bio: Mohan Manubhai Trivedi is a Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and founding director of the Computer Vision and Robotics Research Laboratory, as well as the Laboratory for Intelligent and Safe Automobiles (LISA) at the University of California San Diego. Trivedi’s team has played a key role in several major research collaborative initiatives. These include design, development and deployment of distributed video arrays for wide area activity analysis, privacy preserving filters for surveillance video arrays for
transportation infrastructures including for freeways, international bridges, and stadiums; systems for vehicle collision avoidance, pedestrian protection and intent analysis, lane-change/turn/merge
assistance; vision-based systems for “smart” airbags, predictive driver intent and activity analysis systems; and panoramic-view surround safety systems and autonomous robotic teams for railway track maintenance and for hazardous environments. His team is recognized as the most prolific and most cited in the intelligent vehicles and intelligent transportations systems field.

He has won over 20 “Best/Finalist” Paper award, has received the IEEE ITS Society’s Outstanding Research Award and LEAD Institution Award as well as the Meritorious Service and Pioneer Award (Technical Activities) of the IEEE Computer Society. He has received Distinguished Alumnus awards from BITS-Pilani, India and Utah State University. He has given over 100 keynote/plenary talks and he regularly serves on panels dealing with technological, strategic, privacy, and ethical issues surrounding research areas he is involved in. He is a Fellow of IEEE, SPIE, and IAPR. Trivedi has served as the Robotics Technical Committee Chair for the IEEE Computer Society, on the Governing Boards of the IEEE Systems, Man & Cybernetics and ITSC Society, Editor-in-Chief of the Machine Vision Applications journal and charter member/vicechair of the University of California System wide Digital Media Innovation (UC Discovery) program. Trivedi serves regularly as a consultant to industry and government agencies in the USA and abroad.



Gold Sponsor

Lockheed Martin


Silver Sponsor

FotoNation
 

Corporate Sponsors

American Elements


FISBA


OSA Publishing

Exhibitors

ALPAO
Santec