Application of Lasers for Sensing & Free Space Communication (LS&C)

Application of Lasers for Sensing & Free Space Communication (LS&C)

The latest developments in laser based sensing and free space laser communication.

Sophisticated laser systems are increasingly being used for information gathering and sharing since they can satisfy many critical needs in sensing and high bandwidth free space optical (FSO) communications.  We are coming into the age where laser systems are a viable competitor to RF systems for many applications.  This meeting reports on the latest use of lasers in diverse fields such as environmental sensing, remote imaging, close-in inspection and medical diagnostics.  Common challenges to both systems, such as atmospheric effects, are also considered.  In addition to applications and systems, this meeting also covers the enabling technologies that are often common in both sensing and communication.  Advances in sources and waveform/wavefront modulation techniques, receivers, optical apertures, and post-detection processing schemes are all required and are subjects of this meeting.



 

Sophisticated laser systems are increasingly being used for information gathering and sharing since they can satisfy many critical needs in sensing and high bandwidth free space optical (FSO) communications.  We are coming into the age where laser systems are a viable competitor to RF systems for many applications.  This meeting reports on the latest use of lasers in diverse fields such as environmental sensing, remote imaging, close-in inspection and medical diagnostics.  Common challenges to both systems, such as atmospheric effects, are also considered.  In addition to applications and systems, this meeting also covers the enabling technologies that are often common in both sensing and communication.  Advances in sources and waveform/wavefront modulation techniques, receivers, optical apertures, and post-detection processing schemes are all required and are subjects of this meeting.
 
Laser Sensing
  • 1-D, 2-D and 3-D imaging lidars, including through foliage and canopies
  • Synthetic aperture lidars
  • Compressed sensing lidars
  • Tomographic lidar
  • Laser systems for remotely piloted and autonomous systems
  • Laser vibration sensing
  • Polarization or multispectral sensing using lasers
  • Atmospheric effects and mitigation for lidar systems
  • Wind sensing with lasers
  • Chemical or biological sensing using lasers
  • Laser diagnostics of combustion
Free Space Optical (FSO) Laser Communication
  • Laboratory FSO demonstrations
  • Space, terrestrial and airborne link demonstrations
  • Atmospheric characterization and mitigation for FSO Systems
  • Laser beam acquisition/Tracking/Pointing
  • FSO quantum cryptography
  • Application of orbital angular momentum states to FSO communications and sensing
  • Underwater optical communications
  • Wavelength-division multiplexing for FSO systems
  • Analysis, modeling simulations
  • Cubesat optical links
  • Optical communication ground stations
Components for Sensing and Communication
  • Optical receivers, including linear and Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes
  • Photon counting receivers (semiconductor and superconducting)
  • Laser sources, including sources for coherent and direct detection approaches
  • Agile waveform generation, including high speed optical modulation techniques
  • Optical wavefront control, including optical beam steering
  • Post-detection processing and exploitation techniques for information gathering and sharing
Qassim Abdullah, WoolpertUnited StatesAdvanced  Sensors Technologies and Platforms to support Today’s Geospatial Mapping Activities , Invited

Jaime Anguita, Universidad de los Andes - ChileChileTowards High-density Orbital-angular-momentum Modulation for Turbulent Channels , Invited

Zeb Barber, Montana State University - Spectrum LabUnited StatesHigh Resolution FMCW Ladar for Imaging and Metrology , Invited

Esther Baumann, National Inst of Standards & TechnologyUnited StatesComb-calibrated FMCW ladar for Ranging and Imaging , Invited

Joe Buck, Lockheed MartinUnited StatesOptical Aperture Synthesis and Compressive Sensing , Invited

Gerald Buller, Heriot-Watt UniversityUnited KingdomSingle-photon Depth Imaging in Free-space and Underwater , Invited

Jean-Daniel Deschênes, Université LavalCanadaOptical Two-way time Synchronization at the Femtosecond Level over a 4-km Free Space Link , Invited

Daniele Faccio, Heriot-Watt UniversityUnited KingdomSPAD Array Imaging and Applications: From Laser Plasma Diagnostics to Tracking Objects Behind a Wall , Invited

Philip Gatt, Lockheed Martin Coherent TechnologiesUnited StatesWindTracer® Evolution and Recent Measurement Results , Invited

Floyd Hovis, Fibertek Inc.United StatesDesign and Flight Qualification of the ICESat-2 Laser Transmitters , Invited

Shoken Ishii, National Inst of Information & Comm TechJapan2-um Coherent Lidar Technology Developed at NICT: Past, Current, and Future , Invited

Shibin Jiang, AdValue Photonics, Inc.United StatesHigh Pulse Energy Single Frequency Fiber Lasers , Invited

George Komar, NASAUnited StatesOverview of NASA Technology Developments for Laser Remote Sensing Missions , Invited

Brian Krause, Lockheed Martin Coherent TechnologiesUnited StatesMotion Compensated Multi-wavelength Digital Holography , Invited

William Lotshaw, The Aerospace CorporationUnited StatesHigh-power Fiber Lasers for Long-range Remote Sensing and Communication Applications , Invited

Joseph Marron, Raytheon CompanyUnited StatesAsynchrounous Geiger Mode Arrays , Invited

Linda Mullen, Naval Air Warfare CtrApplication of Radar Technology to Underwater Detection, Ranging and Imaging , Invited

William Rabinovich, US Naval Research LaboratoryUnited StatesModulating Retro-Reflectors Links In High Turbulence: Challenges And Solutions , Invited

Stojan Radic, University of California, San DiegoUnited StatesScalable Frequency Comb Emitters: Fundamental and Practical Performance Limits , Invited

Derryck Reid, Heriot-Watt UniversityUnited KingdomChemical Sensing Using Broadband Mid-IR Femtosecond OPOs , Invited

Haris Riris, NASA Goddard Space Flight CenterUnited StatesTrace Gas Detection with Lidar from Space , Invited

Todd Rose, The Aerospace CorporationUnited StatesSmall Satellite Platforms for Lasercom and LIDAR Demonstrations and Applications , Invited

Jeffrey Shapiro, Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyUnited StatesPhoton-Efficient 3D Imaging , Invited

Gary Spiers, United StatesThe Remote Measurement of Column Integrated Carbon Dioxide using Differential Optical Absorption Lidar , Invited

Marie-Thérèse Velluet, ONERAFranceOptical links between ground to space : propagation channel study , Invited

Vince Velten, Air Force Research LabUnited States, Invited

Alan Willner, University of Southern CaliforniaUnited StatesOrbital-Angular-Momentum Multiplexing for High-Capacity Free-Space Optical Communications , Invited

Jirong Yu, NASA Langley Research CenterUnited StatesA Novel Triple-Pulsed 2-µm Lidar for Simultaneous and Independent CO2 and H2O Column Measurement , Invited

Chair

Edward WatsonUniversity of Dayton, United States

Member

Claudine BessonONERA, France
Walter BuellThe Aerospace Corporation, United States
Timothy CarrigLockheed Martin, United States
Richard HeinrichsMassachusetts Institute of Technology, United States
Hamid HemmatiFacebook Inc., United States
Sammy HendersonBeyond Photonics
Thomas KarrDARPA/STO, United States
Robert LambSELEX Galileo Ltd, United Kingdom
Eduard LuzhanskiyNASA, United States
Paul McManamonExciting Technology LLC, United States
David RabbUS Air Force Research Laboratory, United States
Larry StottsStotts Consulting, United States
Abbie WatnikUS Naval Research Laboratory, United States
Jie WeiCity University of New York, United States
Keith WilsonJet Propulsion Laboratory, United States
Conference Plenary Sessions

Tuesday, 9 June, 08:00 - 09:30
John Mather,  NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, USA
Shree Nayar, Columbia University, USA

Wednesday, 10 June, 09:00 – 10:00
W.E. Moerner, Stanford University, USA

Conference Reception

Monday, 8 June, 19:00 – 20:30
Join your fellow attendees for the Congress Reception. Enjoy delectable fare while networking. The reception is open to committee/presenting author/student and full conference attendees. Conference attendees may purchase extra tickets for their guest.

Joint Poster Session

Tuesday, 9 June, 19:00 – 20:30
Posters are an integral part of the technical program and offer a unique networking opportunity, where presenters can discuss their results one-to-one with interested parties. Each author is provided with a board on which to display the summary and results of his or her paper.

International Year of Light Panel on Freeform Optics
Wednesday, 10 June, 19:30 – 21:30, Salon 4
 
Leads
Jannick Rolland, University of Rochester, USA
Julius Muschaweck, ARRI, Germany
 
Panelists
Angela Davies, UNC at Charlotte, USA
Thomas Dresel, Ametek Zygo, USA
Christoph Menke, Carl Zeiss, Germany
Joseph Owen, UNC at Charlotte, USA
Kevin Thompson, Synopsys, USA

John Mather

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, USA
Nobel Prize in Physics 2006
The James Webb Space Telescope 

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), planned for launch in October 2018, utilizes high performance imaging optics to see beyond what the great Hubble Space Telescope can see, farther away and farther back in time.   It will be the workhorse telescope for a generation of space astronomers, opening the infrared (0.6-28 µm) window with a 6.6 m aperture cold telescope. To test it end-to-end, we have developed remarkable laser interferometer technologies, with computer-generated holograms to test the primary mirror, and it must all be done cold and in a vacuum tank.  I will outline the mission design, the scientific objectives, and the current status.

John Mather is a Senior Astrophysicist and is the Senior Project Scientist for the James Webb Space Telescope at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) where his research centers on infrared astronomy and cosmology.  He led proposal efforts for the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), which ultimately enabled the COBE team to show that the cosmic microwave background radiation has a blackbody spectrum within 50 parts per million, confirming the expanding universe model (the Big Bang Theory) and initiating the study of cosmology as a precision science. The COBE team also first mapped the hot and cold spots in the background radiation (anisotropy), now attributed to quantum fluctuations in an inflationary period in the first 10-36 sec of the universe; Stephen Hawking called their discovery “the most important scientific discovery of the century, if not of all time.”

W.E. Moerner

Stanford University, USA
Nobel Prize Winner in Chemistry 2014

W. E. Moerner, the Harry S. Mosher Professor of Chemistry and Professor, by courtesy, of Applied Physics at Stanford University, conducts research in physical chemistry and chemical physics of single molecules, single-molecule biophysics, super-resolution imaging and tracking in cells, and trapping of single molecules in solution. His interests span methods of precise quantitation of single-molecule properties, to strategies for three-dimensional imaging and tracking of single molecules, to applications of single-molecule measurements to understand biological processes in cells, to observations of the photodynamics of single photosynthetic proteins and enzymes. He has been elected Fellow/Member of the NAS, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, AAAS, ACS, APS, and The Optical Society. Major awards include the Earle K. Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy, the Irving Langmuir Prize in Chemical Physics, the Pittsburgh Spectroscopy Award, the Peter Debye Award in Physical Chemistry, the Wolf Prize in Chemistry, and the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.


Shree Nayar

Columbia University, USA

Advances in Computational Imaging
Computational imaging uses new optics to capture a coded image, and an appropriate algorithm to decode the captured image. This approach of manipulating images before there are recorded and processing recorded images before they are presented has three key benefits. First, it enables us to implement imaging functionalities that would be difficult, if not impossible, to achieve using traditional imaging. Second, it can be used to significantly reduce the hardware complexity of an imaging system. Lastly, under appropriate imaging conditions, it allows us to break the limits of traditional imaging. In this talk, I'll show recent examples of cameras that demonstrate these benefits.

Shree K. Nayar is the T. C. Chang Professor of Computer Science at Columbia University. He heads the Columbia Vision Laboratory (CAVE), which develops advanced computer vision systems. His research is focused on three areas - the creation of novel cameras that provide new forms of visual information, the design of physics based models for vision and graphics, and the development of algorithms for understanding scenes from images. His work is motivated by applications in the fields of digital imaging, computer graphics, robotics and human-computer interfaces.

Nayar received his PhD degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. For his research and teaching he has received several honors including the David Marr Prize (1990 and 1995), the David and Lucile Packard Fellowship (1992), the National Young Investigator Award (1993), the NTT Distinguished Scientific Achievement Award (1994), the Keck Foundation Award for Excellence in Teaching (1995), the Columbia Great Teacher Award (2006), and the Carnegie Mellon Alumni Achievement Award (2009). For his contributions to computer vision and computational imaging, he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2008, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2011, and the National Academy of Inventors in 2014.