2014 Fellows

Recent Fellows


2014 OSA Fellows

OSA is pleased to announce the 2014 class of Fellows. This distinction was awarded to 71 OSA members for their significant contributions to the advancement of optics and photonics. The selection of these candidates was confirmed by the Board of Directors at its meeting in October 2013.

The Society appreciates the efforts of the nominators and of the members of the 2013 Fellow Members Committee who reviewed the 149 nominations eligible for consideration. This year’s committee included Ann Catrina Coleman (chair), Timothy J. Carrig, Kishan Dholakia, Qihuang Gong, Hiromasa Ito, Mary A. Johnson, Walter Margulis, Lenore McMackin, Nirmala Ramanujam, Kevin P. Thompson, Narsingh Bahadur Singh and Xiaocong Larry Yuan.

Nominations for next year are due by 15 June 2014. For more information, contact the OSA Awards Office (awards@osa.org; +1 202.416.1960) or go to www.osa.org.

Our congratulations to these new Fellows, many of whom will be honored at OSA conferences throughout the year.

Andrea Alù
University of Texas at Austin, U.S.A.
For outstanding contributions to the fields of photonic metamaterials, plasmonic phenomena and devices, cloaking, and scattering suppression.


Richard D. Averitt
Boston University, U.S.A.
For groundbreaking achievement and pioneering research in fundamental physics and applied optics of terahertz metamaterials and correlated electron materials.


John H. Belk
Boeing Research & Technology, U.S.A.
For outstanding technical and program leadership in optics and photonics for industrial R&D including innovative applications of interferometry, spectroscopy, ellipsometry and nano-calorimetry.


Timothy J. Bunning
U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, U.S.A.
For development of novel softmatter dynamic optical material systems, including holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal gratings and photo- and electrooptical cholesteric liquid crystals.


Zenghu Chang
University of Central Florida, U.S.A.
For the development of novel means for generating and characterizing broadband single isolated attosecond pulses and for the invention of methods for stabilizing carrierenvelope phase of chirped-pulse amplified lasers.


Scott A. Crooker
Los Alamos National Laboratory, U.S.A.
For the development and application of magneto-optical spectroscopies to colloidal quantum dots and to electron spin transport and noise in semiconductors.


Brian T. Cunningham
University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign, U.S.A.
For the invention, development and commercialization of biosensors and detection instrumentation based upon nanostructured surfaces and for the development of biological applications.


Milorad Cvijetic
University of Arizona, U.S.A.
For sustained pioneering contributions to the coherent optical transmission technology and commercial development of high-speed wavelength-multiplexed optical communications systems.


Marcos Dantus
Michigan State University, U.S.A.
For the development of the multiphoton intrapulse interference phase scan for automated femtosecond pulse compression and shaping and for applications ranging from materials processing to bioimaging.


Chen Yuan Dong
National Taiwan University, Taiwan
For important contributions in biomedical imaging based on nonlinear excitation.


Charles G. Durfee
Colorado School of Mines, U.S.A.
For the development of the hollow-core waveguide technology for high harmonic generation that has led to engineered XUV light sources for attosecond science.


Xudong (Sherman) Fan
University of Michigan, U.S.A.
For seminal work in optical biochemical sensors and optofluidic devices, in particular optical ring resonator label-free biosensors, optofluidic lasers and optical vapor sensors.


Alessandra Gatti
Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnologies of CNR (National Research Council), Italy
For pioneering contributions to the field of quantum imaging.


Ornan (Ori) Gerstel
Cisco, Israel
For seminal contributions to high-capacity optical networking that have enhanced efficiency, reconfigurability and flexibility of different types of architectures.


Bo Gu
BOS Photonics, U.S.A.
For outstanding and sustained contributions in development of lasers, laser systems and applications, in particular laser micro- and nano-machining in industrial fabrication and high-power fiber laser applications in industrial metal processing.


Chunlei Guo
University of Rochester, U.S.A.
For pioneering contributions in laser-matter interactions and applications, including the discoveries of the black and colored metals and exploring their wide range of applications.


Mool C. Gupta
University of Virginia, U.S.A.
For contributions to high-power laser-material interactions and their applications in optical data storage, photovoltaics, optical devices and ferroelectric materials.


Ingmar Hartl
DESY, Germany
For outstanding contributions to femtosecond fiber lasers and frequency combs across the optical spectrum, and to OSA.


Ahmed Hassanein
Purdue University, U.S.A.
For pioneering modeling and experimental work in laser and particle beam interaction with materials in extreme environments for advanced lithography and fusion applications.


János Hebling
University of Pécs, Hungary
For seminal contributions to strong-field terahertz science via developing terahertz pulse sources based on tilted-pulse-front pumping and for increasing the single-cycle terahertz pulse energy by seven orders of magnitude.


Hamid Hemmati
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, U.S.A.
For pioneering and sustained achievements and contributions to the field of satellite and interplanetary laser communications.


Ortwin Hess
Imperial College London, United Kingdom
For work on active nanoplasmonic metamaterials, semiconductor optics and laser dynamics and for pioneering spatiotemporal dynamics of semiconductor lasers and “stopped light” in metamaterials.


Craig A. Hoffman
U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, U.S.A.
For substantial contributions to the understanding of infrared focal plane arrays and the optoelectronic properties of narrow-gap semiconductors.


Simon Martin Hooker
University of Oxford, United Kingdom
For research into short-pulse laser interactions with matter and, in particular, the development and applications of plasma waveguides for high-intensity laser pulses.


Janice A. Hudgings
Pomona College, U.S.A.
For studies of performance and dynamics in semiconductor devices, such as VCSELS and LEDs, including novel high-precision diagnostics through thermoreflectance tomography, and for exemplary contributions in science education and volunteer/professional service.


Diana Huffaker
University of California Los Angeles, U.S.A.
For contributions to new nanostructured semiconductor materials and devices for photonic applications.


Hongxing Jiang
Texas Tech University, U.S.A.
For outstanding research contributions to the synthesis, characterization and applications of optoelectronic devices based on III-nitride semiconductor materials.


Maria Kafesaki
Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas and University of Crete, Greece
For the ground-breaking numerical demonstration of large gaps for optical and acoustic materials and for seminal contributions to photonic crystals, metamaterials science and nanophotonics.


Kafai Lai
IBM, U.S.A.
For seminal and influential contributions to extend optical lithography and pioneering work on source mask optimization in the semiconductor industry.


Anders G. Larsson
Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden
For contributions to semiconductor laser diodes, particularly digital high-modulation-speed vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers.


Laura M. Lechuga
Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia CSIC and CIBER-BBN, Spain
For significant research leadership and pioneering development of novel and compact biomedical sensors based on advanced integrated photonic techniques and plasmonic devices, combining science with real-life applications and technology transfer.


Uriel Levy
Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel
For outstanding contributions to the development of novel CMOS-compatible nano-photonic and nano-plasmonic devices.


Gong-Ru Lin
National Taiwan University, Taiwan
For significant contributions to fundamental and application studies of silicon quantum dots in photonic devices.


José Miguel López-Higuera
Universidad de Cantabria, Spain
For noticeable technical contributions to optical sensing and contributions to promoting photonics in Spain.


Alan A. Madej
National Research Council, Canada
For pioneering work on the strontium ion system, developing it as an optical frequency standard, and for advancing precision optical frequency metrology.


Laura Marcu
University of California Davis, U.S.A.
For the development and clinical translation of fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy and imaging techniques.


Nergis Mavalvala
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, U.S.A.
For leadership in applying squeezed light to improve the sensitivity of the LIGO gravitational wave detectors.


David E. McClelland
Australian National University, Australia
For leadership in developing squeezed light for improving the sensitivity of the LIGO gravitational wave detectors.


Andrea Melloni
Politecnico di Milano, Italy
For significant contributions to the development of high-index-contrast, waveguide-based, integrated-optical circuits with application in advanced optical communications.


Jerome Mertz
Boston University, U.S.A.
For outstanding contributions to optical microscopy applied to biological imaging.


Donald T. Miller
Indiana University, U.S.A.
For pioneering research in high-resolution imaging and adaptive optics in the eye.


Kathy T. Mullen
McGill University, Canada
For many distinguished contributions to the understanding of color vision and service to OSA as chair of the Vision and Color Division.


Mikhail A. Noginov
Norfolk State University, U.S.A.
For pioneering scientific contributions to the fields of random lasers, plasmonics and metamaterials, and for demonstrating the spaser-based nanolaser.


Vasilis Ntziachristos
Helmholtz Zentrum München, Germany
For pioneering contributions to the fields of optical molecular imaging in vivo, fluorescence molecular tomography, optoacoustic imaging and surgical fluorescence systems.


Kyunghwan Oh
Yonsei University, South Korea
For outstanding contributions in novel fiber optic waveguide design and fabrication and its applications in active and passive photonic devices.


Wolfgang Osten
University of Stuttgart, Germany
For numerous significant contributions to optical metrology and information processing including areas such digital holography, phase retrieval and display, and micro-and nano-optics.


Aydogan Ozcan
University of California Los Angeles, U.S.A.
For contributions to computational imaging, sensing and holography technologies, and instrumentation impacting bio-photonics and its applications to telemedicine and global health.


Peter E. Powers
University of Dayton, U.S.A.
For fundamental studies of nonlinear parametric interactions and for practical applications to the development of optical parametric devices operating from infrared to terahertz regimes.


Min Qiu
Zhejiang University, China, and KTH, Sweden
For significant contributions in nanophotonics, including photonics crystals, plasmonics and metamaterials.


Rebecca Richards-Kortum
Rice University, U.S.A.
For pioneering diagnostic technologies based on optical sensing and imaging of disease and for developments that enable these technologies to impact the delivery of health care in resource-limited environments.


Jennifer C. Ricklin
U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, U.S.A.
For technical innovation and leadership in high-technology aerospace and defense systems.


Werner Rosenkranz
University of Kiel, Germany
For sustained contributions to the field of optical communications for more than 20 years, most recently in equalization and compensation of impairments in fiber optic systems.


Mark Saffman
University of Wisconsin, U.S.A.
For groundbreaking contributions to neutral atom quantum computing with Rydberg state interactions.


Holger Schmidt
University of California Santa Cruz, U.S.A.
For pioneering contributions to the development and integration of hollow-core waveguides and their applications in optofluidics, biophotonics and atom photonics.


Alphan Sennaroğlu
Koç University, Turkey
For contributions to the understanding of emerging infrared laser materials and the development of femtosecond laser sources.


Yan-Kuin Su
Kun Shan University, Taiwan
For achievement in preparation of compound semiconductor materials and in fabrication of and education in optoelectronic devices.


Misha Sumetsky
Aston University, United Kingdom
For seminal work in the theory and experimental demonstration of optical microresonators.


Masatoshi Suzuki
KDDI R&D Laboratories, Japan
For seminal contributions to electro-absorption modulators, dispersion-managed solitons and large-capacity WDM undersea cable systems.


Dacheng Tao
University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
For achievements in image and video processing, optical pattern recognition and electronic imaging.


Yasuo Tomita
University of Electro- Communications, Japan
For significant contributions to the development and applications of photopolymerizable nanocomposite materials in light/neutron optics and near- infrared/ultraviolet-light-sensitive photorefractive materials.


Alessandro Tredicucci
NEST, Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, Pisa, Italy
For demonstrating a terahertz quantum cascade device, the first compact injection laser in the far infrared.


Bruce Warren Wessels
Northwestern University, U.S.A.
For pioneering research in epitaxial materials and devices, especially wide-gap semiconductors and ferroelectric oxides for optoelectronic and electro-optic applications.


Brian C. Wilson
University of Toronto, Canada
For sustained contributions to the field of biophotonics, spanning over 30 years and encompassing outstanding research, technology development, clinical translation, and training and education in the areas of light dosimetry, photodynamic therapy fluorescence, and Raman endoscopy, microscopy and nanophotonics.


Chee Wei Wong
Columbia University, U.S.A.
For controlling photons in chip-scale systems, including photonic crystals, and for measurements of their nonlinear, ultrafast and quantum optic response.


Franco N.C. Wong
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, U.S.A.
For pioneering development and applications of spontaneous parametric downconverter sources of entangled light, including the Sagnac source, single-photon two-qubit quantum logic, and secure communication using quantum illumination.


Xiaoliang Sunney Xie
Harvard University, U.S.A.
For pioneering contributions to the development of nonlinear vibrational imaging, including coherent anti-Stokes Raman and stimulated Raman scattering microscopy, and its applications to chemistry, biology and medicine.


Dan-Xia Xu
National Research Council, Canada
For outstanding contributions to the science, technology and application of integrated optics.


Rui Qing Yang
University of Oklahoma, U.S.A.
For invention and development of the mid-infrared interband cascade laser and related optoelectronic devices.


Qiwen Zhan
University of Dayton, U.S.A.
For seminal contributions to the development of new optical polarization engineering techniques for controlling light-matter interactions on the nanometer scale.


Zhiping (James) Zhou
Peking University, China
For seminal contributions to the field of nano-optoelectronics devices for communication, computing and sensing, and for leadership in developing nano-optoelectronics in China.


Jonathan D. Zuegel
University of Rochester, U.S.A.
For sustained and significant technical contributions and leadership in inertial confinement fusion and ultra-high-intensity laser technology and for professional service to OSA.