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OSA News Releases

Welcome to the OSA News Releases page. This page contains news from The Optical Society, including research highlights from OSA's journals, conference news, award announcements and more. Sort releases by category below to see all the news releases in a particular area.

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The OSA BioPhotonics Congress: Optics in the Life Sciences concluded in San Diego with over 300 attendees and a robust technical program covering the ever increasing role of optics in biology and medicine. Today’s optical technologies can be used for imaging and sensing everything from molecules to man. The OSA BioPhotonics Congress was comprised of five topical meetings highlighting the role of optics in the study and treatment of various challenges in the life sciences ranging from molecular level investigations to clinical treatment of patients. ​

The Optical Society (OSA), the leading professional association in optics and photonics, will host a variety of special events during the 2017 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO) at the San Jose Convention Center in San Jose, California, from 14-19 May 2017. The events feature unique networking and professional development programs, a reception with OSA Publishing editors and special opportunities for OSA members and their families.

For the first time, researchers have followed the development of blood vessels in zebrafish embryos without using any labels or contrast agents, which may disturb the biological processes under study.

To eradicate any cancer cells that may potentially remain after surgery or chemotherapy, many breast cancer patients also undergo radiation therapy. All patients experience unfortunate side effects including skin irritation, and sometimes peeling and blistering. Patients can also develop permanent discoloration of the skin and thickening of the breast tissue months, or even years, after treatment.

Using a tiny device known as an optical antenna, researchers have created an X-ray sensor that is integrated onto the end of an optical fiber just a few tens of microns in diameter. By detecting X-rays at an extremely small spatial scale, the sensor could be combined with X-ray delivering technologies to enable high-precision medical imaging and therapeutic applications.

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