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OSA News Releases

Welcome to the OSA News Releases page. This page contains news from the Optical Society, including research highlights from OSA's journals, conference news, award announcements and more. Sort releases by category below to see all the news releases in a particular area.

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  • George Bayz Named Treasurer of OSA
    George Bayz Named Treasurer of OSA
    09 October 2013
    The Optical Society (OSA) Board of Directors voted to confirm the appointment of George Bayz as Treasurer, an officer role of the Society, starting Jan. 1, 2014.

  • OSA Names Distinguished Service Award in Honor of Stephen D. Fantone
    OSA Names Distinguished Service Award in Honor of Stephen D. Fantone
    08 October 2013
    The Optical Society (OSA) Board of Directors voted today to rename the OSA Distinguished Service Award to the Stephen D. Fantone Distinguished Service Award.

  • OSA Elects Alan E. Willner as 2014 Vice President
    OSA Elects Alan E. Willner as 2014 Vice President
    08 October 2013
    The Optical Society (OSA) is pleased to announce that its members have elected Alan E. Willner of the University of Southern California, USA as its 2014 vice president. Three directors at large were also chosen during this year's election: Anne Tropper of the University of Southampton, UK; Adam Wax of Duke University, USA; and Xi-Cheng Zhang of the Institute of Optics at the University of Rochester, USA.

  • A Better Breathalyzer
    A Better Breathalyzer
    08 October 2013
    Italian researchers have developed a novel idea for an inexpensive, portable breathalyzer whose color would change from green to red with higher alcohol concentrations. But unlike current color change-based devices, this sensor would be reusable and could also provide a precise digital readout.

  • Naked Jets of Water Make a Better Pollutant Detector
    Naked Jets of Water Make a Better Pollutant Detector
    03 October 2013
    When you shine ultraviolet light (UV) through water polluted with certain organic chemicals and bacteria, the contaminants measurably absorb the UV light and then re-emit it as visible light. Many of today’s more advanced devices for testing water are built to make use of this fluorescent property of pollutants; but the walls of the channels through which the water travels in these devices can produce background noise that makes it difficult to get a clear reading.

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