News Releases

OSA News Releases

Welcome to the OSA News Releases page. This page contains news from The Optical Society, including research highlights from OSA's journals, conference news, award announcements and more. Sort releases by category below to see all the news releases in a particular area.

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  • You can learn a lot about the state of someone's immune system just by examining their blood under the microscope. An abnormally high or low white blood count, for instance, might indicate a bone marrow pathology or AIDS. The rupturing of white blood cells might be the sign of an underlying microbial or viral infection. Strangely shaped cells often indicate cancer.

  • The Optical Society (OSA) announced today that it has implemented a technology solution that effectively supports U.S. federal agency public access requirements and helps authors comply with governmental mandates to make their federally funded articles publicly available after a 12-month embargo. By partnering with CHORUS (Clearinghouse for the Open Research of the United States), OSA enables an option for readers and agencies to easily discover federally funded articles published by OSA and to then access the full-text of these articles directly on OSA's platform, OSA Publishing.

  • Modern digital cameras are equipped with an impressive array of functions – from autofocus and image stabilization to panoramas and high-definition video. Recently a team of engineers from Duke University has unlocked a previously unrecognized 3D imaging capability of modern cameras by simply repurposing its existing components.

  • Nanowires are a relatively new technology and their full potential is still being explored. When the tiny wires are made from a semiconductor like silicon, light striking the wire will dislodge electrons from the crystal lattice, leaving positively charged "holes" behind. Both the electrons and the holes move through the material to generate electricity.

  • Optica, The Optical Society’s newest journal, dedicated to rapidly disseminating the highest impact peer-reviewed research across the entire spectrum of optics and photonics, has celebrated its one-year anniversary

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