OSA Wraps Up its 95th Annual Meeting, Frontiers in Optics 2011, in San Jose


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Contact:
Angela Stark
The Optical Society
202.416.1443
astark@osa.org

OSA Wraps Up its 95th Annual Meeting, Frontiers in Optics 2011, in San Jose

WASHINGTON, Oct. 21—For 95 years, the optical science community has been gathering to discuss the latest advances in all areas of the field of optics and photonics at OSA’s Annual Meeting, Frontiers in Optics (FiO). From its start as a local meeting in New York in 1916 to an international conference highlighting hot topics of today such as invisibility cloaking and optical coherence tomography, FiO continues to be the premier venue for staying up-to-date in all aspects of the field. FiO 2011, co-located with Laser Science XXVII, the annual meeting of the American Physical Society (APS) Division of Laser Science (DLS), wrapped up in San Jose, Calif., this week after five days of cutting-edge research presentations, powerful networking opportunities, and engaging educational programs.

Headlining the Plenary and Awards Session on Monday were four optics luminaries speaking on a range of hot topics in the field. Ferenc Krausz of Ludwig-Maximilian’s University in Germany spoke on the latest developments in attosecond science, which he says is entering the next decade of innovation.  Sir John Pendry of Imperial College London spoke on sub-wavelength optics and the idea of a “perfect lens.”  The winner of OSA’s Frederic Ives Medal/Jarus W. Quinn Endowment, Ivan Kaminow, gave an interesting look at the early days of lightwave communications, while APS’s Arthur L. Schawlow Prize Winner Jorge Rocca discussed current efforts in compact soft x-ray laser research.

Attendees could choose from more than 850 technical presentations this year, on topics as diverse as digital holography and optical microfabrication to optical signal processing and metamaterials. FiO research generated plenty of buzz including coverage in the New York Times, MSNBC.com, Yahoo! News, NPR, and GizMag, among others. World-renowned researchers spoke on the world’s first temporal cloak, a novel way to tag brain tumors with gold nanoparticles, using the nanostructures of bird feathers to develop lasers, and transforming an iPhone into a high-quality medical imaging device.

New this year, approximately 40 percent of all of the FiO/LS content was recorded and made available within 24 hours of the presentation. Full technical attendees can access the content for free, while those who were unable to attend can access it on a pay-per-view basis.

In addition to the acclaimed research, attendees benefited from a wealth of special events and programming.  To name a few, technical division chairs gave an overview of the hot topics in optics today in virtually every sub-field of optics, five special symposia were held on topics ranging from ultrashort pulses to optofluidics, and women leaders in the field came together for a panel discussion on current issues  and trends facing women and minorities in science. 

Business programming offered attendees perspectives on topics such as patent reform and starting a business in today’s marketplace, while a packed exhibit hall showcased the latest innovations on the market today.
Attendees also paused from technical and industry programming to network with colleagues and make new connections, including at the OSA Member Reception Masquerade Party.

FiO/LS 2011 provided attendees from around the world with the opportunity to network, present, learn, and connect. Join us next year as we head back to Rochester, N.Y., for FiO/LS 2012, Oct. 14-18 at the Rochester Riverside Convention Center.

About OSA
Uniting more than 130,000 professionals from 175 countries, the Optical Society (OSA) brings together the global optics community through its programs and initiatives. Since 1916 OSA has worked to advance the common interests of the field, providing educational resources to the scientists, engineers and business leaders who work in the field by promoting the science of light and the advanced technologies made possible by optics and photonics. OSA publications, events, technical groups and programs foster optics knowledge and scientific collaboration among all those with an interest in optics and photonics. For more information, visit www.osa.org.